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Old 02-08-2013, 08:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
ROFLMAO! Very valid point.
And Les Nessman's mother lives there. Need we say more?
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Old 02-08-2013, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
(and adopted locals who have moved to one and decided to continually villify the others) can't seem to understand that to OUTSIDERS they are at most marginally different.
I am an outsider who adopted Dayton because my son was under continuing care at Dayton Children's. I absorbed Dayton, walked and biked it's streets, studied it's history, explored it's neighborhoods, worked on Leitzel's election campaign, got very involved locally - heck I even own property in Linden Heights.

I agree with you, because I ignorantly though Cincinnati was a larger Dayton, that was until I moved to Cincinnati. Having absorbed Cincinnati, I am qualified to a marked degree to point out the differences between the two cities. And when I comment on Dayton it's from an ex-resident who was attempted to become VERY involved in the city of Dayton.

I'm very happy to discuss where Cincinnati could improve. The only problem is that on this forum board some of the detractors haven't been very knowledgeable on what's actually been happening in Cincinnati. So instead of taking on issues that could improve, we have wound up arguing what is and what isn't.

My 2 cents anyway.
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Old 02-08-2013, 08:52 AM
 
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TJ - I know you moved from one to the other and was not specifically talking about you (I think you are from somewhere else (East Coast?) originally...

You are not the norm. Most transplants (generic transplants) do not adopt their new cities with the zeal you have. They are not politically active to the point of working on campaigns as perhaps you did in Dayton. Sure, a small subset of people do (Yay them!) - but most approach living in a metropolitan area much more generically.

They move to an area, find out where the Target/Kroger/Car Repair shop is and then look at "what is there to do in this area"??

From that view - which I will admit is a superficial one - Dayton and Cinci are marginally different at best.

And in talking about Dayton and Cinci coming together - it is at the level of their metropolitan areas. Not the city limits of one stretching to incorporate the other)

At the granular, "My goetta is superior to yours!" level - I'm sure there are all sorts of micro cultures that are apparent.

But in general SW Ohio is a homogenous culture. It is different than Cleveland, sure. It is different than Detroit - sure.

But unless you get to the "someone paid a sociologist to see how many times Cincinnatians use "Please" in the German manner rather than the English manner" level of detail -- they're just not different cities.

A person who moved to Kettering, from Chicago, would not be particularly horrified at Mason or Deerfield, or even Princeton Glendale.

That's not because suburbs are homogenous (though they are), but because the areas are homogenous. Language is the same. Food choices are *essentially* the same. Even politics is essentially the same... because the small cadre of hard core dems in the center of Cinci is not enough to outvote the generally republican nature of cinci-metro area.

Someone moving from Louisianna might suffer culture shock moving to Ohio. They would not suffer additional culture shock moving from Dayton to Cinci.

I understand that Dayton is not turning things around fast enough to satisfy yourself, I would imagine many Dayton residents feel the same -- but that does not deny the demographic reality if the current development/residential trends keep up.

The cities will join.

And people like myself who live in the metropolitan area and are not heavily involved in one downtown vs. the other, will not care - because for a majority of us the cities are already joined.

(seriously - they are separated by like 45/50 miles. No moat, no mountain range, no island effect)
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
TJ - I know you moved from one to the other and was not specifically talking about you
I whole heartedly agree that there is very little difference in the suburbs of either city. I have had little contact with the suburbs of either city and remain silent on them, mostly out of not knowing much about them. So, I suspect there are marginal differences, especially in the towns that were overtaken by commuter sprawl, those differences seem to be over shadowed by the homogeneity you point out.

However, the two cities are quite different, both historically and present day. The differences quickly fade as you move out to the inner ring suburbs.

That's probably the biggest difference in our perspectives. Yours is from the in-between the two cities, and mine is from the urban core of the two cities.
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:52 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Quote:
As a transplant to SW Ohio, I find Dayton and Cinci (culturally) to be indistinguishable -- both have things to offer, if I want to partake.
From where did you relocate, may I ask?


@@@

For culture vultures, having two cities with a full compliment of SOB, plus two Equity theatre companies, and 'second tier' performing arts orgs (DCDC in Dayton and Contemporary Dance Theatre in Cincy, as an example...since I am a balletomane...). ....is a good thing.

Joint schedules or better coordination btw these scenes could be a boon....
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:54 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,748,743 times
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I think the suburbs of Dayton are actually nicer than the Cincy ones, which seem really poorly developed or planned.

You get that in Dayton too, but these areas are not that extensive. Suburbia here is somehow more humane (maybe due to size and that the country is always close at hand) vis the endless dreary stuff one experiences in Cincy on occasion...
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I think the suburbs of Dayton are actually nicer than the Cincy ones, which seem really poorly developed or planned.

You get that in Dayton too, but these areas are not that extensive. Suburbia here is somehow more humane (maybe due to size and that the country is always close at hand) vis the endless dreary stuff one experiences in Cincy on occasion...
My initial impressions are the same. Dayton's burbs seem a lot more compact than Cincy's.
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:52 AM
 
3,750 posts, read 10,203,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
From where did you relocate, may I ask?


@@@

For culture vultures, having two cities with a full compliment of SOB, plus two Equity theatre companies, and 'second tier' performing arts orgs (DCDC in Dayton and Contemporary Dance Theatre in Cincy, as an example...since I am a balletomane...). ....is a good thing.

Joint schedules or better coordination btw these scenes could be a boon....
From the Detroit Metropolitan area --

grew up in the East Side suburbs of detroit (old-ring suburbs, not far out from the city) - and when I was a kid Ann Arbor was basically the other side of the Earth. No one went there, you had to drive through miles and miles and miles! of farmland once you crossed Detroit to get to Ann Arbor. Ann Arbor was not included in the weather forecasts, and very little news was mentioned of Ann Arbor unless it was something huge and specific to UofM

35+ years later, when I left... (after a couple of out of state stints away at college), I was living in the Ann Arbor area, and the 40 miles between Ann Arbor and Detroit had seamlessly developed. Ann Arbor news was regularly included in the metro-detroit news casts, and for all intents and purposes Ann Arbor was considered PART of the Detroit Metro area, not a far flung college outpost.

That said - Ann Arbor (of course!) has a different feel that a lot of the rest of the Detroit-metro. Its very high tech, and very liberal. But that isn't enough of a differentiation to isolate them from the rest of Metro area.

Which is one of the reasons why I think eventually Dayton/Cinci will grow even more intertwined. They're too close together not to, as individually substantial population centers.
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Old 02-08-2013, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati near
2,507 posts, read 3,351,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
My initial impressions are the same. Dayton's burbs seem a lot more compact than Cincy's.
The city of Dayton is just a lot smaller and more symmetrical than Cincinnati and not constrained by a river on the southern side, so the suburbs start much sooner. The sprawl really kicks in 15 miles from downtown in both metros. Cincinnati has plenty of compact suburbs, like Silverton, Deer Park, Madison Place, Cheviot, Blue Ash, Madeira, Kenwood and the list goes on. The distance from downtown Dayton to Kettering is similar to the distance between downtown and the geographical center of Cincinnati. Go 20 miles north of Dayton and the development is just as sprawly as anything in Cincy's exurbia.
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Old 02-08-2013, 11:11 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,794 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I think the suburbs of Dayton are actually nicer than the Cincy ones, which seem really poorly developed or planned.

You get that in Dayton too, but these areas are not that extensive. Suburbia here is somehow more humane (maybe due to size and that the country is always close at hand) vis the endless dreary stuff one experiences in Cincy on occasion...
I agree with this. Centerville, Bellbrook, Kettering, Miamisburg and Springboro are some of the nicest suburbs in the Cincinnati-Dayton region. Many of Cincinnati's suburbs - particularly the northern ones - are just a character-less mess.
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