U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-08-2013, 12:17 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,664,626 times
Reputation: 1385

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
That's what people do when they want to feel superior to other people.


All gone, or mostly so. GM closed its plant, NCR left for Atlanta and sold its property to UD, and even L'Auberge closed about a year ago and all its "stuff" went up for auction recently.
But the Pine Club is still there (bring cash). And Milano's. And Marion's. And Cassano's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-08-2013, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,842,345 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chemistry_Guy View Post
The city of Dayton is just a lot smaller and more symmetrical than Cincinnati and not constrained by a river on the southern side, so the suburbs start much sooner. The sprawl really kicks in 15 miles from downtown in both metros. Cincinnati has plenty of compact suburbs, like Silverton, Deer Park, Madison Place, Cheviot, Blue Ash, Madeira, Kenwood and the list goes on. The distance from downtown Dayton to Kettering is similar to the distance between downtown and the geographical center of Cincinnati. Go 20 miles north of Dayton and the development is just as sprawly as anything in Cincy's exurbia.
Good points. Thanks.

I guess north of Dayton - Englewood, Vandalia, Troy, Tipp City would qualify.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2013, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,410,202 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
I agree with this. Centerville, Bellbrook, Kettering, Miamisburg and Springboro are some of the nicest suburbs in the Cincinnati-Dayton region. Many of Cincinnati's suburbs - particularly the northern ones - are just a character-less mess.
You can call them a character-less mess. But guess what, West Chester Twp in Butler Co. alone has a population of around 65,000 so apparently a lot of people have decided it meets their needs just fine. And that is before you even get to the fast growing Liberty Twp to the north or to Mason to the east across the border in Warren Co. Just amazing how these character-less suburbs have attracted such a large number of people since there is obviously nothing to attract them here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,842,345 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
You can call them a character-less mess. But guess what, West Chester Twp in Butler Co. alone has a population of around 65,000 so apparently a lot of people have decided it meets their needs just fine. And that is before you even get to the fast growing Liberty Twp to the north or to Mason to the east across the border in Warren Co. Just amazing how these character-less suburbs have attracted such a large number of people since there is obviously nothing to attract them here.
Easy Brill. No need to defend your turf here. Just someone's opinion, that they are entitled to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2013, 01:10 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 10,249,005 times
Reputation: 6561
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
I agree with this. Centerville, Bellbrook, Kettering, Miamisburg and Springboro are some of the nicest suburbs in the Cincinnati-Dayton region. Many of Cincinnati's suburbs - particularly the northern ones - are just a character-less mess.
I live in Lebanon, which I neither characterize as a true suburb of Cinci (it had its own identity first), nor as characterless. I'm not saying I find the character to be awesome (too quaint and antique-y emphasis for us), but it definitely has character.

The suburbs you've mentioned of Dayton are fine, but I don't really see anything that special about them (no different than WestChester/Mason as far as more recent growth suburbs goes)..

I've only seen parts of Belbrook, but it is fairly low population density with alot of sprawl. Kettering is nice, as an older suburb (many houses look like ranches from before the '70s - maybe more like the '50s), Springboro is way out and like Lebanon basically had its own original downtown area, Miamisburg is basically the Mall and surrounding areas.

Centerville I do like, but have friends who grew up in the area who deride it as Pretensious and "new Money"..

I think Oakwood is beautiful, but then again Hyde Park is also lovely.


I don't think either city is particularly better than the other in this regard, just that due to the relative flatness, Dayton seems (on a whole) a little more compact in its metro, than Cinci does.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2013, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,842,345 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
Dayton seems (on a whole) a little more compact in its metro, than Cinci does.
I agree with this more so since Clark County was dropped from Dayton's metro area a few years ago.

I suspect a lot of towns like Mason had more character before commuter sprawl encroached. And I'm not calling Mason characterless across the board, but having worked there a little and getting a feel for the area, the old downtown Mason is worlds from the new developments there in terms of character.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2013, 01:33 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,664,626 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
I live in Lebanon, which I neither characterize as a true suburb of Cinci (it had its own identity first), nor as characterless. I'm not saying I find the character to be awesome (too quaint and antique-y emphasis for us), but it definitely has character.

The suburbs you've mentioned of Dayton are fine, but I don't really see anything that special about them (no different than WestChester/Mason as far as more recent growth suburbs goes)..

I've only seen parts of Belbrook, but it is fairly low population density with alot of sprawl. Kettering is nice, as an older suburb (many houses look like ranches from before the '70s - maybe more like the '50s), Springboro is way out and like Lebanon basically had its own original downtown area, Miamisburg is basically the Mall and surrounding areas.

Centerville I do like, but have friends who grew up in the area who deride it as Pretensious and "new Money"..

I think Oakwood is beautiful, but then again Hyde Park is also lovely.


I don't think either city is particularly better than the other in this regard, just that due to the relative flatness, Dayton seems (on a whole) a little more compact in its metro, than Cinci does.
Lebanon is as charming as it gets - I love the downtown area and the surrounding landscape. I forgot to mention it earlier.

Don't assume Miamisburg is just the mall area. It has a beautiful downtown area set against the river, with century-old brownstones, quaint restaurants and pubs and a nice town center. Of course, a lot of people don't know it's there because they think of Miamisburg as a bunch of chain stores when actually that's Miami Township. Check it out next time you're there. Downtown Miamisburg is several miles west of the 75.

Oakwood is gorgeous; Hyde Park isn't a suburb it's part of the city.

Centerville is my favorite (I'm biased of course). It retains its historic stone buildings, some dating to the late 1700s, in the preservation district. It has a priceless parks district with many old-growth forest parks. It's just minutes from Lebanon, Waynesville, Springboro and the quaint areas to the south while still being close enough to the amenities of the Dayton Mall area, the Greene, etc. It has a great school system that excels in academics and athletics. And C'ville has the comfortable gathering spots (Graeter's, MacDiggers, Flavors, O'Leary's, Beefs, etc.). If I had to live in an outer suburb again, I wouldn't think twice in picking Centerville. Like your view of Lebanon as not being a true suburb, I get a similar vibe from Centerville. It has its own history pre-dating Dayton and thrived for decades as little more than a stage stop between Cincinnati and Dayton.

Mason has its nice downtown area, but the Fields Ertel/MM Road debacle negates its positives for me. West Chester is the worst, in my opinion. It doesn't retain any charm of the other places mentioned. It's sprawled new plastic construction and chain heaven. No thanks. I'd live in Mason before West Chester.

Last edited by abr7rmj; 02-08-2013 at 01:58 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2013, 01:53 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,773,921 times
Reputation: 2959
Actually Dayton suburbia extends more along a north-south axis. There is an entire "empty quater" west of the city, and Greene County is only recently developing a big way.

I don't really want to put-down Cincy suburbia. The older towns are really neat (thlinking Wyoming and Norwood and Glendale) as well as the older parts of the new suburbs (like Mason or Sharonville). And there are those two model communities on how to 'do suburbia' (at least in terms of site planning and greenspace): Greenhills and Mariemont

It's just the stuff in-between (cue mental image of, say, Colerain Rd by that shopping mall, SR 4 to Hamilton, Red Bank Highway, that road north of Sharonville into Westchester, etc) that is so visually chaotic and scruffy.

I think its because Cincy is so big. Dayton has stretches like that to on certain highways (north Dixie Drive would be the best worst example, and parts of Salem Ave), but since its a smaller city with smaller suburbs these stretches go by fast.

I also think the civil engineerrs doing traffic planning are pretty agressive in doing access control and limiting curb cuts (in fact I was told this by a guy working planning for that OKI regional planning agency) and sign controls and such, so the way things where developed starting in the 1970s and maybe even in the late 1960s (with the advent of the PUD concept) means there was less laissez faire and more planning and control on how things were built-out....in suburbia. Its still suburbia, but maybe more thought-out....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2013, 01:56 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 10,249,005 times
Reputation: 6561
I like Centerville too.

Sorry, I forget that HP isn't an actual suburb (silly Cinci with all the neighborhoodiness) - so you're right.

So Oakwood would be more Mariemont in that case.

I didn't know about Miamisburg downtown area, I'll look for it when I'm back in that area with time on my hands (admittedly, not often).

WestChester (old WestChester) has a small original city center (its very small), just as there is old Mason. Of course, like Miamisburg, what people think of is all the new sprawling development (stores/big box/malls) around that original center.

Though WestChester is quite small, even compared to Old Mason.

Techincally the Field'sErtl/MM exchange is Deerfield Twp. I used to kind of blow that difference off, but I eventually have realized its a real difference. Mason is really much less sprawl-y than one would think, it is really DeerField Twp that is the major sprawl that people typically seem to associate with Mason.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2013, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,578 posts, read 2,310,511 times
Reputation: 651
The state knows the 2 are merging. It was one reason I-75 was widened to 8 lanes between the two metro's. They know development will accelerate between the two.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top