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Old 02-11-2013, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I expect that is based on estimated population figures since the 2010 census.
Quit going off topic. I pulled the numbers from the 2010 census.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Quit going off topic. I pulled the numbers from the 2010 census.
You are looking at a different 2010 census than I did, the numbers I got were 841,502 and 2,130,151 which equal 2,971,653. Admittedly close to 3,000,000 but not quite there. Certainly population figures vary year to year and we are in 2013 not 2010. If you have a magical source of accurate numbers please let us all know.

Why is my comment off topic? My emphasis is cities like Cincinnati and Dayton need to use terms like MSA and CSA to cover up their loses in population. I happened to lived here in 1950 and remember how all aspects of life, including the inner-ring suburbs revolved around the City of Cincinnati. I just do not happen to believe that is any longer the case. Come to the suburbs some time and see just how many successful businesses are located here, the good working environments they have for their employees, and how they value the importance of the home to the success of their business. They have located in the suburbs because they believe their best employees want to live in the suburbs.

I have no problem with businesses who want to attract ambitious young people locating downtown. They will hire 3 times more than they intend to keep and then weed them out. What I do not buy into is the concept they all are some sort of tech-savy geniuses. Most of them, if they come into the office and their desk computer comes up with a blue screen have no idea what to do other than call the IT department.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati near
2,507 posts, read 3,350,911 times
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I think it's funny that the most pro-urbanity people want the MSAs to merge and the more suburban leaning people are arguing against it. The mechanism that causes the economic regions to overlap is suburban sprawl. It is strip malls, subdivisions, and useless interstate exits. The more old farmers sell their farms to Walmart and subdivisions pop up in the middle of nowhere the closer to reality Cin-Day becomes.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,011,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chemistry_Guy View Post
I think it's funny that the most pro-urbanity people want the MSAs to merge and the more suburban leaning people are arguing against it. The mechanism that causes the economic regions to overlap is suburban sprawl. It is strip malls, subdivisions, and useless interstate exits. The more old farmers sell their farms to Walmart and subdivisions pop up in the middle of nowhere the closer to reality Cin-Day becomes.
Hi Chemistry_Guy--

I consider Cin-Day to be a greater region for all intents and purposes. You can be damned sure I searched the whole area from Walton to Tipp City when doing a market research report.

That said, it helps some people's e-peen status if "Cincinnati" was part of a 3-million metro area, which would be the largest in Ohio. They're hoping it would move Cincinnati up the priority list for federal dollars (probably true).
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:30 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,747,512 times
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Quote:
I was surprised to learn Dayton's population is close to half of Cincinnati's. I thought it was a much smaller city. Same goes for the MSA population.
Yes, this is a bit of a suprise..for whats inside the city limits?

Quote:
So is that the reason to argue for a combined Day-Cin MSA, to make Cincinnati appear larger than it really is?
Yes, of course, this is a bragging reights (& maybe a marketing) thing...the way Louisville started to claim this big move up the size rankings after their city/county merger.


Quote:
1950 Cincinnati 503,998, today 296,233, difference = -207,765 or -41.2%
1950 Dayton 243,872, today 142,148, differenence = -101,724 or -41.7%


I would call this a dead heat as to who can lose population the fastest.

Yes...and this is quite a suprise since, within the city limits, Dayton seems by far the bleaker and emptier place.
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Yes...and this is quite a suprise since, within the city limits, Dayton seems by far the bleaker and emptier place.
I think the fact the city limits of Dayton are smaller influences this. Many people simply do not get out to the further Cincinnati limits, when was the last time you were in Westwood or Madisonville? Downtown Cincinnati is quite compact and I believe what many people consider the City. In reality it is a small percentage of the City's population. The downtown and CBD are enjoying a resurgence, which is good, actually great. But look at that population loss since 1950, how many see that coming back soon?
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
But look at that population loss since 1950, how many see that coming back soon?
Brill, this is the same argument you have repeated, ad nauseum. Here, read up on the topic.

What’s the full story behind Cincinnati’s 50-year population decline? — UrbanCincy

And again, Cincinnati will never return to the city it was, but will have to continue to change to grow into a healthy city again. It's off to a great start, because it begins in the urban core.
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
And again, Cincinnati will never return to the city it was, but will have to continue to change to grow into a healthy city again. It's off to a great start, because it begins in the urban core.
So keep contending the urban core is the anthesis of everything. It is a vibrant contributor, but it does not control eveerything which happens in the Metro area. That is what I object to, the urbanists want to be in total control. That day has come, went, and gone. The suburbs also control their own destiny, and is is very much tied to Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,725,886 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chemistry_Guy View Post
I think it's funny that the most pro-urbanity people want the MSAs to merge and the more suburban leaning people are arguing against it. The mechanism that causes the economic regions to overlap is suburban sprawl. It is strip malls, subdivisions, and useless interstate exits. The more old farmers sell their farms to Walmart and subdivisions pop up in the middle of nowhere the closer to reality Cin-Day becomes.
this is exactly what i was getting at with my earlier posts, but i didn't communicate it quite that well.

people like the idea of cin-day because on its face the creation of such a region would infer that we are a relevant and prosperous area. but the reality is that the only way that cin-day would be built would be through more sprawl, the kind that hurts both urban and existing suburban areas.
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,124 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
So keep contending the urban core is the anthesis of everything. It is a vibrant contributor, but it does not control eveerything which happens in the Metro area. That is what I object to, the urbanists want to be in total control. That day has come, went, and gone. The suburbs also control their own destiny, and is is very much tied to Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.
Whatever are you going on about.

Here, read this for some added perspective.

https://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/26/o...burb.html?_r=0
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