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Old 02-11-2013, 10:17 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,794 times
Reputation: 1385

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
You are looking at a different 2010 census than I did, the numbers I got were 841,502 and 2,130,151 which equal 2,971,653. Admittedly close to 3,000,000 but not quite there. Certainly population figures vary year to year and we are in 2013 not 2010. If you have a magical source of accurate numbers please let us all know.

Why is my comment off topic? My emphasis is cities like Cincinnati and Dayton need to use terms like MSA and CSA to cover up their loses in population. I happened to lived here in 1950 and remember how all aspects of life, including the inner-ring suburbs revolved around the City of Cincinnati. I just do not happen to believe that is any longer the case. Come to the suburbs some time and see just how many successful businesses are located here, the good working environments they have for their employees, and how they value the importance of the home to the success of their business. They have located in the suburbs because they believe their best employees want to live in the suburbs.

I have no problem with businesses who want to attract ambitious young people locating downtown. They will hire 3 times more than they intend to keep and then weed them out. What I do not buy into is the concept they all are some sort of tech-savy geniuses. Most of them, if they come into the office and their desk computer comes up with a blue screen have no idea what to do other than call the IT department.
Then why is Interstate 71 an absolute parking lot at 5 p.m. heading south from Fields Ertel toward the city? See how long it takes you to get from Western Row to, say, Kenwood at about 5:15 on a weekday afternoon.

Where in the world could all those Mason workers be heading?

The reason they located in the suburbs is because its cheaper, and nothing else. It's a lot cheaper to pave over some woods or a field and build a generic shoebox office park surrounded by acres of free asphalt parking than it is to develop downtown.
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:20 AM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,707 posts, read 6,564,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Whatever are you going on about.

Here, read this for some added perspective.

https://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/26/o...burb.html?_r=0
Quote:
For too long, we over-invested in the wrong places. Those retail centers and subdivisions will never be worth what they cost to build. We have to stop throwing good money after bad. It is time to instead build what the market wants: mixed-income, walkable cities and suburbs that will support the knowledge economy, promote environmental sustainability and create jobs.
Is this implying that the current housing stock was NOT what the market wanted when it was built? The pendulum is swinging, as it has done before. To those who want the lifestyle of the urban centers, I say more power to you. As for me, the only way you will get me there is if I have absolutely no say in my circumstances.
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Then why is Interstate 71 an absolute parking lot at 5 p.m. heading south from Fields Ertel toward the city? See how long it takes you to get from Fields Ertel to, say, Kenwood at about 5:15 on a weekday afternoon.

Where in the world could all those Mason workers be heading?


Quote:
Mason went from being a sleepy farm town of less than 5,000 residents in the 1960s to a large bustling community of Cincinnati commuters in the 1990s.
Right. Those Cincinnati commuters moved to Mason to commute to Mason.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrtechno View Post
Is this implying that the current housing stock was NOT what the market wanted when it was built? The pendulum is swinging, as it has done before. To those who want the lifestyle of the urban centers, I say more power to you. As for me, the only way you will get me there is if I have absolutely no say in my circumstances.
True, trends are changing. To me those trends do not spell doom for suburbia, or new life for cities. To each their own. Really, for whatever reason, I am usually classed as an "ubanist," and therefore must be anti-suburb. Nothing is further from the truth. People should be able to live where they are happy. I prefer to live in larger cities. You like where you are. I really don't see any conflict.

Cities, suburbs, neighborhoods, etc, seem somewhat cyclical in nature. I think the NYT article shows that and lays out circumstances that have caused some suburbs to become slums.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,360,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post

Right. Those Cincinnati commuters moved to Mason to commute to Mason.
Parhaps you need to evaluate what percentage of people who live in Mason actually work in Mason. At least what percentage do not work inside the Cincinnati city limits.

You want to say I-71 southbound out of Mason is a parking lot in the PM? Don't know where they are all going? How about to Madeira, Blue Ash, Deer Park, Montgomery and all the rest of the nearby suburbs they all live in.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Parhaps you need to evaluate what percentage of people who live in Mason actually work in Mason. At least what percentage do not work inside the Cincinnati city limits.

You want to say I-71 southbound out of Mason is a parking lot in the PM? Don't know where they are all going? How about to Madeira, Blue Ash, Deer Park, Montgomery and all the rest of the nearby suburbs they all live in.
Brill, you are just wrong. I reverse commuted to Mason for a short stint when I took on a trim carpentry project. Traffic was definately worse going into Cincinnati in the mornings and away from Cincinnati in the evenings. And I took 71.

You are denying the simple truth. Mason was a small farm town that was overtaken by commuter sprawl from Cincinnati. To argue otherwise is ridiculous. If it weren't for Cincinnati, Mason would still be a small farm town out in the sticks.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:57 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,794 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Parhaps you need to evaluate what percentage of people who live in Mason actually work in Mason. At least what percentage do not work inside the Cincinnati city limits.

You want to say I-71 southbound out of Mason is a parking lot in the PM? Don't know where they are all going? How about to Madeira, Blue Ash, Deer Park, Montgomery and all the rest of the nearby suburbs they all live in.
How about to Hyde Park, Oakley, Pleasant Ridge, Mount Lookout, Mount Washington, downtown, OTR, Clifton, Mount Adams?

See, I can play your game too.

And it's funny that all those Montgomery and Blue Ash residents that you reference aren't getting off at Montgomery or Blue Ash. They're continuing down the hill into the city, which is why SB traffic is snarled well past Ridge. I guess they're just headed for dinner at one of our fine city restaurants before going back to the burbs, huh?
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Old 02-11-2013, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,360,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Brill, you are just wrong. I reverse commuted to Mason for a short stint when I took on a trim carpentry project. Traffic was definately worse going into Cincinnati in the mornings and away from Cincinnati in the evenings. And I took 71.

You are denying the simple truth. Mason was a small farm town that was overtaken by commuter sprawl from Cincinnati. To argue otherwise is ridiculous. If it weren't for Cincinnati, Mason would still be a small farm town out in the sticks.
I was not the one who said traffic south from Mason in the evening was conjested. Look at response #151 by abr7rmj. Where is he coming from?

You may have come out to do some carpentry work here, but you obviously did not pay much attention to where people who live here actually work. It doesn't take all that many people commuting from Lebanon, Mason, Landen, Symmes Twp, Blue Ash & Montgomerry to cause a pileup on I-71. That does not mean everyone works in Cincinnati. It only takes a small percentage to backup I-71.

Yes, Mason was a sleepy farm town when I moved here, but no more. When It comes to technology rich companies with high paying jobs, Mason and the rest of the suburbs do not have to take a back seat to anyone. As I have said, companies have located here due to the fact they realize their employees also like to live here. Live where you work and work where you live, it is a great combination.

Champion your urban environment all you want. I find nothing wrong with that. But when you say the suburbs would not exist without Cincinnati, Wrong, Wrong, Wrong! How else could the City lose 50% of its population and the suburbs are still going strong?
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Old 02-11-2013, 12:21 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,794 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I was not the one who said traffic south from Mason in the evening was conjested. Look at response #151 by abr7rmj. Where is he coming from?

You may have come out to do some carpentry work here, but you obviously did not pay much attention to where people who live here actually work. It doesn't take all that many people commuting from Lebanon, Mason, Landen, Symmes Twp, Blue Ash & Montgomerry to cause a pileup on I-71. That does not mean everyone works in Cincinnati. It only takes a small percentage to backup I-71.

Yes, Mason was a sleepy farm town when I moved here, but no more. When It comes to technology rich companies with high paying jobs, Mason and the rest of the suburbs do not have to take a back seat to anyone. As I have said, companies have located here due to the fact they realize their employees also like to live here. Live where you work and work where you live, it is a great combination.

Champion your urban environment all you want. I find nothing wrong with that. But when you say the suburbs would not exist without Cincinnati, Wrong, Wrong, Wrong! How else could the City lose 50% of its population and the suburbs are still going strong?
Centerville. I go there at least once or twice a week, and often more, to check on my parents.
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Old 02-11-2013, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,918 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I was not the one who said traffic south from Mason in the evening was conjested. Look at response #151 by abr7rmj. Where is he coming from?
It's congested both ways, but more congested the way I said.

Uhh...how would I be able to "pay attention" to where people actually work? And how do you know? Source please? Or are you just stating opinion?

And Mason is still very sleepy. It will always be in Cincinnati's shadow, which why it's in the Cincinnati Metro. Cincinnati is not in the Mason metro. Sorry.
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