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Old 06-02-2014, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,197 posts, read 57,331,348 times
Reputation: 52054

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OHKID View Post
NCR under Bill Nutti is a half step above Foxconn, maybe...
I hope he's enjoying all those big bugs in Georgia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
Consolidation is everywhere. I can see the 2 metro's as one media market. The affiliates will eventually merge.
I don't see that at all, at least not for a long time. The two markets are still very distinct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thgencincy View Post
And I mean no offense, but she was obviously from the smaller part of Miamisburg and just did not fit in to this urban conversation, yet she put up a front like she fit in here more than anybody else.


Quote:
So no, Miamisburg is not a neighborhood in Cincinnati, at least not yet.
No doubt everyone in Miamisburg just breathed a sigh of relief.
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Old 06-03-2014, 02:54 AM
Yac
 
5,875 posts, read 6,294,617 times
As the thread continues, remember that the best way to fight ignorance is educating the ignorant, not attacking them for their ignorance.
Yac.
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Old 06-03-2014, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,367,556 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yac View Post
As the thread continues, remember that the best way to fight ignorance is educating the ignorant, not attacking them for their ignorance.
Yac.
Especially when your definition of ignorance may differ considerably from theirs.

Any subject with as broad an implication as the merging of two metros is going to get a wide range of responses.

No, No, I am a Daytonian and I do not want to be sucked up into Cincinnati.

Yes, Yes, make it happen now, it is great for the area. Why, I don't know, just everyone says it is.

We just have to evaluate each response and act accordingly. There is no reason to get excited or abusive. What transpires on this forum is not likely to have any significant impact, it is just dialogue.
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Old 06-03-2014, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati, OH
148 posts, read 168,428 times
Reputation: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
. . . CIN-DAY (or, more specifically, the "CIN-DAY corridor, now designated the "AERO-SPACE corridor" by the U.S, Commerce Dept.) . . .
Thanks motorman for mentioning the Aerospace Corridor. It certainly feels good just seeing that formality and infrastructure coming into place regardless how large the eventual payoff becomes (hopefully huge).
As I understand it (as a layman), here are the accomplishments so far, and others feel free to add info. or correct my mistakes:
1. Somebody had the foresight to create the 'Aerospace Corridor' name or designation a few years ago.
2. GE invested $65 million to build the new R&D building at Univ. Dayton for unmanned flight research, leveraging UD's rich history of research partnership with Wright Patterson AFB.
3. Initiative to create an unmanned flight testing hub sponsored by (and benefiting) the tri-partnership of GE, UD, and WPAFB.
4. Dayton Aerospace Corridor concept expanded to become Cincinnati-Dayton Aerospace Corridor or Southwestern Ohio Aerospace Region (not sure which), accompanied by numerous public and private entities jumping on board including the Cincinnati and Dayton city governments, regional development groups and the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, and maybe Jobs Ohio (not sure about them).
5. Awarded one of twelve Manufacturing Community designation for participation in $1.2 billion grant money, as C-D member unusualfire brought to our attention a few days ago.

So it's a great coming together of area entities, and thanks to GE for investing some cash.
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Old 06-03-2014, 12:59 PM
 
268 posts, read 290,820 times
Reputation: 184
I just can't envision Cincinnati and Dayton as one metro area. They quite a distance apart, for one thing (regardless of how much sprawl exists between them). There's still quite a few pockets of no-man's-land when driving up 75.

Dayton and Cincy just feel different to me, though. I grew up in Butler County, outside of Oxford (rural), and it's nothing I can put my finger on or articulate very well (probably since I didn't identify with either city as a kid/young adult), but I do know when I go to downtown Cincy versus downtown Dayton, it's a different vibe.

For the record, I live in Wilmington, but I work in Cincy, so I down there quite a bit for work and events. A lot of my weekend stuff does happen around Centerville/Kettering/Miamisburg/south Dayton.
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Old 06-03-2014, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,367,556 times
Reputation: 1920
^^^ I hope you don't work in downtown Cincinnati, as that is quite a commute.

I like Wilmington, but only if I could both live and work there. CIN-DAY isn't going to do much for Wilmington. Why are you still in Wilmington? Did you just happen to move there and never got the energy to leave? What? I understand if you grew up in Oxford having an affinity for rural areas, but golly gee whiz.
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Old 06-03-2014, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,123,049 times
Reputation: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarryOn View Post
I just can't envision Cincinnati and Dayton as one metro area. They quite a distance apart, for one thing (regardless of how much sprawl exists between them). There's still quite a few pockets of no-man's-land when driving up 75.

Dayton and Cincy just feel different to me, though. I grew up in Butler County, outside of Oxford (rural), and it's nothing I can put my finger on or articulate very well (probably since I didn't identify with either city as a kid/young adult), but I do know when I go to downtown Cincy versus downtown Dayton, it's a different vibe.

For the record, I live in Wilmington, but I work in Cincy, so I down there quite a bit for work and events. A lot of my weekend stuff does happen around Centerville/Kettering/Miamisburg/south Dayton.

There's a religious difference and Dayton casually spans rivers.
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Old 06-04-2014, 06:45 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 10,211,776 times
Reputation: 6560
I guess I just can't understand the inability to process Cin/Day as a "METRO" area. Its not saying the two cities are one city. Its not saying the cities don't have some different things going on. Its saying that the development and urbanization around the two cities is basically indistinguishable and that therefore there is 1 metropolitan area with two major components.


When I was a kid the Detroit metropolitan area was distinct from the Ann Arbor area, to the point that Washtenaw County (where AA sits) was not mentioned in news/weather forecasts on the TV channels, because it (45 miles away from Detroit) was soooooooooooo far away.

By the time I was grown and living in AA/Ypsi - the infill development between the outskirts of the Detroit Metro along the I-75 and I-96 corridors had filled in substatially to the point that there was really no separation between AA and Detroit metro, as such, it de-facto became part of the detroit metro area, included in Detroit television channel news/weather, etc reports, though from a governmental perspective it is in the Detroit-Flint-AA CSA (combined statistical area).

No one would say that AA is exactly the same as Detroit (for one - there is a huge population difference, among other large differences), but few who live there would pretend that they are separated in any significant way.


I would assume, given another 20-30 years of development along I-75 (and to a lesser extent I-71 to Columbus) that the Dayton/Cinci corridor will become just that, indistinguishable to most. However, given the attitudes of many of the locals (my 10 square miles is different than the 10 square miles 30 miles north of me) - maybe you will defy the odds and manage to prevent that from happening (You could have a check point defined on I-75 / Rt 48 / Rt 42 to remind people that the areas are NOT THE SAME!).
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Old 06-04-2014, 01:48 PM
 
3,515 posts, read 3,784,740 times
Reputation: 1813
^I can explain why there are big cultural shifts in the area.

In the course of about 80 miles from north to south in the region, one goes from the borderline between bluegrass KY and Appalachian KY to traditional midwestern / great lakes Ohio. Almost no one would ever describe any city north of Dayton as "Appalachian" or any city south of Walton KY as "Midwestern". Nor would anyone call anywhere north of Cincinnati, honestly, part of Horse country or Bourbon country, just as no one would ever consider anything south of Cincinnati to be part of the Rust belt.

The region, essentially, spans the divide between the traditional north and the traditional south. For instance, the hills end after I-275 by Springdale if you are driving north on I-75. The characteristic of points south of that are decidedly different than points north. Just as the sprawl in KY is decidedly different than the sprawl between the two bypasses.

If you placed an average residential Dayton street in Cincinnati, you would know it was out of place. The housing styles, topography type, character, etc. wouldn't match. Put the same Dayton street in Chicago or Cleveland, for the most part you couldn't tell a difference. Take a Cincy street and put it in Pittsburgh or St. Louis (or even Philadelphia or Baltimore if you were considering residential architecture alone) and you would have the same phenomena.


Detroit and Ann Arbor are far more similar. They have similar topography, similar architecture, and almost no cultural differences.
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Old 06-04-2014, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,367,556 times
Reputation: 1920
OHKID ^ pretty good analysis.

Helps explain to me why Cin/Day are not one metro as they have not merged. They will merge when the cultural differences are not distinguishable. That has a while to come.
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