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Old 07-27-2018, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,378 posts, read 3,694,700 times
Reputation: 1746

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dollhouse fanatic View Post
Cincinnati-Dayton are closer than fifty miles
if you consider Centerville to say West Chester
or Mason. I heard heard much about the two
becoming more like Minneapolis-St. Paul someday.
Development is always going on between Dayton
and Cincinnati. It probably won't be in my lifetime
though.
Don't be so sure. This was the headline and front page article of today's Dayton Daily News...

Census might link Dayton, Cincinnati:
feds may declare the 2 cities as a single metro statistical area
__________________________________________________ ______


Could Dayton and Cincinnati be combined into one large metro area?
By Thomas Gnau - Staff Writer
Updated: 12:27 p.m. Thursday, July 26, 2018 | Posted: 10:49 a.m. Thursday, July 26, 2018

Dayton —
This is the year the federal government defines and re-defines metropolitan statistical areas for census purposes — and Steve Stanley, executive director of the Montgomery County Transportation Improvement District, thinks it’s possible the feds will unite Dayton and Cincinnati into a single, newly minted MSA.

The edges of the two cities have been drawing closer and increasingly, people who live in Dayton’s South Suburbs work in Cincinnati or its northern environs.

“Maybe there will be a single MSA in the next Census,” Stanley said Thursday at the Miami Twp. branch library. “If not, it will happen in the near future.”

The idea has been discussed for years and was a driving force in the creation of the Austin Boulevard-Interstate 75 interchange in the past decade, Stanley said. Between Austin Landing and Cincinnati’s northern edges are only about 20 miles.

Such a MSA redefinition would “probably” be a good thing for Dayton, Stanley said. A newly created Dayton-Cincinnati MSA would consist of about 3 million people, slightly larger than the Tampa-St. Petersburg MSA in Florida.

A new Dayton-Cincinnati MSA would get more recognition and would rise on population rankings, Stanley told a Small Business Resource Rally audience at the Miami Twp. library branch.
Today, Dayton and Cincinnati are in separate MSAs.

The Dayton MSA consists of more than 800,000 residents in Montgomery, Greene and Miami Counties while the Cincinnati “Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana” MSA has some 2.16 million residents in Butler, Warren, Hamilton, Clermont and Brown counties, with counties in Northern Kentucky and parts of Southeastern Indiana.

The Dayton MSA has a median household income of $51,427 and a poverty rate of 16.1 percent, according to Data USA, a web site that harnesses Census data.

Meanwhile, Cincinnati’s MSA has a median household income of $60,260 and a poverty rate of 12.6 percent.

Doug Harnish, principal of Dayton market analysis firm Market Metrics LLC, noted that the Cincinnati MSA has more executives and more highly paid professional athletes.

In fact, the Dayton area has lost much of what was once its corporate presence, Harnish said.
“We have become the ‘GEM city’ because our drivers are government, education and medicine,” he said.
What will drive the Census to bring Dayton and Cincinnati together? Employment, Stanley said. He estimated that maybe some 30 percent of Springboro residents are employed in the Queen City or its northern environs.

“We have an extraordinarily large number of people … who commute to Northern Cincinnati and vice versa,” Stanley said.

Harnish said the Cincinnati area’s growth engine is Warren County.
From 2017 to 2022, Warren is projected to see 9,467 new households — much higher than the 2,362 new households projected for Hamilton County and the 3,276 new households projected for Montgomery County, according to Harnish’s data.
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Old 07-27-2018, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,576 posts, read 2,302,691 times
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I doubt it would be an MSA anytime soon, unless they combine the urbanized area's. CSA is what will happen first. The two already meets that criteria.
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Old 07-27-2018, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,576 posts, read 2,302,691 times
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The new Re-defines were done in April. Only one new CSA and that is San Antonio. Using the 2010 standards. Maybe the 2020 standards will have different criteria's.


https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-conten...8-03-Final.pdf


It's possible it's not the big one the media is talking about.

Last edited by unusualfire; 07-27-2018 at 09:26 AM..
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Old 07-27-2018, 12:08 PM
 
Location: OH
361 posts, read 546,227 times
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I wish people would stop reaching for this Cincinnati-Dayton merger. The two cities are over 50 miles apart. Combining the two cities into one MSA will not happen anytime soon, if ever.

Dayton and Cincinnati do not feel all that connected to me, despite what some people claim here on C-D. DC and Baltimore feel more connected IMO, and they’re closer together, yet they are separate metros.

The commuting patterns are not strong enough for Cincinnati and Dayton to be one metro. From my experiences, Daytonians hardly ever give any thought to Cincinnati, and many even distance themselves from Cincinnati.
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Old 07-27-2018, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
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I don't know about that. I know many people where I work at in sharonville that lives in Dayton.
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Old 07-27-2018, 04:11 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 13th Alphabet View Post

The commuting patterns are not strong enough for Cincinnati and Dayton to be one metro. From my experiences, Daytonians hardly ever give any thought to Cincinnati, and many even distance themselves from Cincinnati.
This is completely untrue. Cincinnati and Dayton are almost inseparably intertwined. I live in Centerville and know more people that work south of here than north. Almost everyone here flies out of CVG, which I will do next week. My car radio presets are more Cincinnati stations than Dayton. I have FC Cincinnati season tickets. We go to Riverbend and the zoo and Kings Island all summer long. We have Skylines and LaRosa's and Graeter's, our store shelves have goetta and QC sausage and Klosterman breads. You won't find many bars in Dayton that don't have local Cincy crafts on draft, nor many in Cincinnati that don't carry Warped Wing.

I work in Centerville but it's a rare week when I'm not in Cincinnati at least once. You couldn't be more wrong in your assessment, and you certainly don't speak for the majority of people I know here.
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Old 07-27-2018, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Colorado
390 posts, read 206,421 times
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From up here in the northern Cincy burbs, West Chester and Mason, Dayton feels close. No more than 20 minutes to I-675. I can be solidly in the Dayton metro much faster than I can drive across the entire Cincy metro into the South burbs of NKY.
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Old 07-30-2018, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
275 posts, read 224,896 times
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I live up in Columbus but have been hearing about this potential merger for years. In my experience, there's always going to be a gravitational pull from larger cities to the smaller metros nearby (i.e. Dayton with Cincinnati, Toledo with Detroit and Akron with Cleveland, to name a few). Making them one huge metro area is a different story.
For the people in between the two cities, where does one stop identifying more with Cincinnati or Dayton and start identifying with the other? You have somewhere like Kings Island that is almost as close to Dayton as Cincinnati, yet people consistently identify Kings Island as being part of Cincinnati. I always figured the line was somewhere around Lebanon or Hamilton. Warren and Butler counties get both Cincinnati and Dayton TV stations, although far more of the former on cable and/or satellite, and as many have mentioned it's probably easier to get to Dayton from areas closer to Cincinnati than the reverse.
If the two areas do merge, in terms of broadcasting, do the separate media markets remain? I think they would have to. The Dayton stations serve areas far to the north and out of the range of any Cincinnati stations, and I can't see people in Springfield suddenly depending on Columbus media (even though it's close) given that the idea of "Dayton-Springfield" has been ingrained into that area for decades.
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Old 07-31-2018, 04:58 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,651 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by 13th Alphabet View Post
I wish people would stop reaching for this Cincinnati-Dayton merger. The two cities are over 50 miles apart. Combining the two cities into one MSA will not happen anytime soon, if ever.

Dayton and Cincinnati do not feel all that connected to me, despite what some people claim here on C-D. DC and Baltimore feel more connected IMO, and they’re closer together, yet they are separate metros.

The commuting patterns are not strong enough for Cincinnati and Dayton to be one metro. From my experiences, Daytonians hardly ever give any thought to Cincinnati, and many even distance themselves from Cincinnati.

This is completely false. I can affirm that I live near Downtown Dayton and commute to the northern environs of Cincinnati (Sharonville/Blue Ash area) every day for work. My commute times are usually similar (or sometimes shorter, if traffic isn't an issue) with my co-workers that live in Northern Kentucky and commute north. I know I'm not the only one that does this drive, since I see many of the same cars drive south every morning as well.
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Old 08-01-2018, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,378 posts, read 3,694,700 times
Reputation: 1746
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
This is completely untrue. Cincinnati and Dayton are almost inseparably intertwined. I live in Centerville and know more people that work south of here than north. Almost everyone here flies out of CVG, which I will do next week. My car radio presets are more Cincinnati stations than Dayton. I have FC Cincinnati season tickets. We go to Riverbend and the zoo and Kings Island all summer long. We have Skylines and LaRosa's and Graeter's, our store shelves have goetta and QC sausage and Klosterman breads. You won't find many bars in Dayton that don't have local Cincy crafts on draft, nor many in Cincinnati that don't carry Warped Wing.

I work in Centerville but it's a rare week when I'm not in Cincinnati at least once. You couldn't be more wrong in your assessment, and you certainly don't speak for the majority of people I know here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCurry1981 View Post
This is completely false. I can affirm that I live near Downtown Dayton and commute to the northern environs of Cincinnati (Sharonville/Blue Ash area) every day for work. My commute times are usually similar (or sometimes shorter, if traffic isn't an issue) with my co-workers that live in Northern Kentucky and commute north. I know I'm not the only one that does this drive, since I see many of the same cars drive south every morning as well.
In support of the comments above, I'd like to share several personal observations concerning growth along the Cin-Day corridor...

Previous to my 2011 retirement move back to Cincinnati, much of my 20-year employment in Middletown and Franklin involved both product delivery extending as far north as Lima, OH and as far south as Lexington, KY, plus factory work in manufacturing centered in Springboro, OH. Within that time period, which may seem ages ago by today's standards, the combined commercial-residential growth along the corridor was quite noticeable. Call such expansion sprawl if you choose, but from my viewpoint it seemed to accelerate with the introductions of the super Wal-Mart to Franklin and the Austin Landing complex to Springboro.

What may be of interest is how many residents of this concentrated area, both due to their jobs and otherwise, tooled up and down I-75, I-675, Springboro Pike, Rt.63,73 and Rt.4, during those previous years. A Reds game, CVG, Riverbend, Dayton Mall, Middfest International, Kings Island, Miamisburg Hospital, Traders World Flea Market or Dorothy Lane Market, no matter. Even back then, a large number of my supervisors, co-workers and friends commuted anywhere and everywhere within this region midway between the two big anchor cities.
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