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Old 02-04-2013, 01:42 PM
 
874 posts, read 1,031,825 times
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I don't really care one way or the other, but if anyone has actually been to Franklin, Carlisle, or Miamisburg lately, you see a bunch of lots that were prepared for development in 2007 or so in anticipation for having a greater connection between the two cities that are now overgrown and void of development. You also see lots of things that were built but are vacant for this reason. I would think that if the interconnection was increasing, that those residential and commercial lots/developments would've been built/used.
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Old 02-04-2013, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,386 posts, read 3,707,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
^ Yeah most of the urban area is west of I-75
You nailed it, unusualfire. Like I just mentioned, only the blind cannot see--and, as for the naysayers, they will always be with us... (What more can I say w/o offending our "usual suspects," huh?)
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Old 02-04-2013, 01:47 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,658,918 times
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Originally Posted by dxdtdemon View Post
I don't really care one way or the other, but if anyone has actually been to Franklin, Carlisle, or Miamisburg lately, you see a bunch of lots that were prepared for development in 2007 or so in anticipation for having a greater connection between the two cities that are now overgrown and void of development. You also see lots of things that were built but are vacant for this reason. I would think that if the interconnection was increasing, that those residential and commercial lots/developments would've been built/used.
Perhaps you're aware of the economic crisis that impacted housing development nationwide the past five years? Cincinnati-Dayton wasn't immune to this. If anything, we fared better than most areas. Go to Denver or Las Vegas and look at some of the suburban residential development voids there.
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Old 02-04-2013, 01:47 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Are you sure you're driving on Interstate 75 between Cincinnati and Dayton?
...don't get off the freeway much?
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Old 02-04-2013, 01:50 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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You nailed it, unusualfire.
He nailed nothing.
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Old 02-04-2013, 01:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
...don't get off the freeway much?
You name it I'm probably there - Lebanon, Waynesville, Red Lion, Springboro, Franklin, Trenton, Monroe. I know every which way to avoid the 75 super slab when I can. I even watched part of the SB pregame show at the Lebanon Buffalo Wild Wings yesterday with my uncle.

Also, my parents live in Centerville and, from Cincinnati, I routinely take 71 to 48 to get there.
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,386 posts, read 3,707,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dxdtdemon View Post
I don't really care one way or the other, but if anyone has actually been to Franklin, Carlisle, or Miamisburg lately, you see a bunch of lots that were prepared for development in 2007 or so in anticipation for having a greater connection between the two cities that are now overgrown and void of development. You also see lots of things that were built but are vacant for this reason. I would think that if the interconnection was increasing, that those residential and commercial lots/developments would've been built/used.
Hey, bruh, nice try--but that doesn't wash. After living in Carlisle three years and then Franklin for thirteen years before returning to our hometown of Cincinnati in September, 2011, I can personally attest to the dynamic growth between the two major metros. Carlisle, then and now, is nothing more than a harmless hilljack community, but Franklin (as benign and boring as it was to my wife and I) was inexorably being connected to and absorbed by the CIN-DAY communities surrounding it, i.e., Middletown and Springboro...all becoming one. (And this, itself, was only a part of a much larger picture extending from Walton, KY. to Tipp City, OH.) Believe me, I was there and and I DID take a "look/see."
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:07 PM
 
874 posts, read 1,031,825 times
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Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Perhaps you're aware of the economic crisis that impacted housing development nationwide the past five years? Cincinnati-Dayton wasn't immune to this. If anything, we fared better than most areas. Go to Denver or Las Vegas and look at some of the suburban residential development voids there.
I am aware of it. I guess I should've pointed out that even the houses and commercial areas that look like they've been around since at least the 1970's seem to have an abandonment rate that makes neighborhoods around Salem Ave. in Dayton look occupied.
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,389,645 times
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IF Cincinnati were smart it would concentrate more on being a unique destination like Charleston, or Savannah, or a Galveston and less about being some grand "metro-conglomerate" that dilutes the unique qualities Cincinnati has.

Otherwise we are just another BLAND metroplex.
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,835,758 times
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Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
IF Cincinnati were smart it would concentrate more on being a unique destination like Charleston, or Savannah, or a Galveston and less about being some grand "metro-conglomerate" that dilutes the unique qualities Cincinnati has.

Otherwise we are just another BLAND metroplex.
I don't think the city is pushing for the designation so much as the census is likely to designate. It's been speculated for some time, as you are aware.

Off topic, I don't think Cincinnati has done very good at marketing itself.
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