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Old 02-23-2013, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natininja View Post
Yeah, because they would feel like they are forced into the environment. Why go faux-historic in an area that is anything but historic? I'd rather see a thoughtful contemporary design in such a context.
Well to be fair, Mason has it's charm. I think because it was a town before development swallowed it up. Obviously, there are newly developed areas that are homogeneous.
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Old 02-23-2013, 11:44 AM
 
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It does, but only in the older parts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Mason has some imitation gaslights along the portion of Tylersville Rd they built.
Sounds to me like this is not one of the older parts.
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Old 02-23-2013, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natininja View Post
It does, but only in the older parts.


Sounds to me like this is not one of the older parts.
They would be out of place to me, but then I am out of place in Mason.
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Old 02-23-2013, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natininja View Post
Yeah, because they would feel like they are forced into the environment. Why go faux-historic in an area that is anything but historic? I'd rather see a thoughtful contemporary design in such a context.
Sorrey, but it just appeals to me. Just drive down the road one time and then tell me they forced it into a non-historic neighborhood. Just what do you consider a contemporary design? I feel what they did fits very well. They wanted to elevate the main entrance into the city and I feel they succeeded.
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Old 02-23-2013, 01:47 PM
 
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http://goo.gl/maps/odHZU
Mason, OH - Google Maps

Very quaint! The ambiance really takes me back in time.

I don't know how to describe contemporary design. I guess more IKEA-like.

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...mg.hDazmu8LC_M

After poking around the area on Streetview, I think they look okay in the park-like area (without driveways, overpasses, and set-back buildings). The buried utility lines would help tremendously (many aren't buried on Streetview). Still, it's lipstick on a pig. A 5-lane highway with vast parking lots and stripmalls doesn't suddenly feel cozy when you put up anachronistic, old-timey streetlights. Same with the landscaped median and intersections.

Those sidewalks make me chuckle. I would rather them be there than not, but who in their right mind is walking around this area? Certainly they aren't doing it for commuting, running errands, or visiting friends. Not surprisingly, I can't find anyone using them on Streetview.
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Old 02-23-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natininja View Post
Those sidewalks make me chuckle. I would rather them be there than not, but who in their right mind is walking around this area? Certainly they aren't doing it for commuting, running errands, or visiting friends. Not surprisingly, I can't find anyone using them on Streetview.
They are not sidewalks, they are bike paths. And while you will not see people on them every hour of the day, they are well used. And Mason keeps building more.

Mostly, it is the early morning and later evening walkers, joggers, and runners who use them the most. And of course a few bikers as they are officially called bike paths. Chuckle all you want, but see all of those side streets, you will be surprised how many people from those neighborhoods use the bike paths for exercise. So much for the image of the fat slob suburbian who just waddles to their car every day.

And take some views of how often the Mason HS cross country team places well in the Ohio State track team competitions. I see them frequently doing their training down those same bike paths you are poopooing. They are a safe place to run, you are not going to get run over by cars, and we now have enough you can transverse a large percentage of the city.
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Old 02-23-2013, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
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Gaslights in Mason, concrete/brick cubes by the river and UC with national-chain outlets on the ground floor, same thing only different.
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Old 02-23-2013, 07:38 PM
 
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kjbrill, I saw some of what I figured were "shared-use paths", but what I see in the second Streetview link I provided look to me like sidewalks. Notice I listed a few things I figured they were not used for, and exercise didn't make the list. That's what is funny to me, is they are more toys or exercise equipment than transportation infrastructure.
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Old 02-23-2013, 07:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goyguy View Post
Gaslights in Mason, concrete/brick cubes by the river and UC with national-chain outlets on the ground floor, same thing only different.
They are quite different, since you can live and shop in one but not the other.

If you mean the stripmalls are the same, they also are not. Because you can live and shop in one, but only shop in the other. Additionally, many people can get to one of them by foot, bike, automobile, bus, or (soon) streetcar, and the other many people can realistically only get to by automobile.

If you mean those concrete & brick boxes share aesthetic qualities with the faux gaslights in Mason, I agree. And that's what's wrong with them.
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Old 02-23-2013, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,222 posts, read 57,353,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natininja View Post
Yeah, because they would feel like they are forced into the environment. Why go faux-historic in an area that is anything but historic? I'd rather see a thoughtful contemporary design in such a context.
Why do anything aesthetic at all, right?

Why shouldn't Mason have attractive street lighting? And who are you to decide?
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