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Old 02-23-2013, 03:53 PM
 
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I've seen the sign for Bexley on U.S. 33 as I return from our Lancaster store. But, somehow, I don't think they'd appreciate me sighteeeing in Bexley with a big rig...
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Old 02-23-2013, 04:14 PM
 
Location: canada
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Default No big rigs for Bexley

I think the cyclists would drive you crazy.
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Old 02-23-2013, 07:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maplelady View Post
Well, i am just learning about Cincy but I don't see Cleveland as anywhere near as bad off as Detroit.
I have been to Pittsburg and the hills and river remind me of Cincy. But Pittsburg has flat parts.

Columbus seems nice, I hope to visit them all.

Was it to be a high speed rail ? can't beat high speed rail.

I have read a book about the proposed subway and why it did not happen.
It was just a bare-bones start-up service, with the idea that improvements would be made to speed things up later on. Columbus is currently the largest American city with zero passenger rail service. Columbus and Dayton would both have gained connections to the national rail network (Amtrak) via Cleveland and Cincinnati. A low-ball quote was given for the speed of the service, which is another thing opponents grabbed onto. In the end, we returned the $400mil granted by the federal government to start the service, and instead that money went to the planned California high speed rail line and a couple other projects around the country.
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Old 02-23-2013, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Originally Posted by natininja View Post
In the end, we returned the $400mil granted by the federal government to start the service, and instead that money went to the planned California high speed rail line and a couple other projects around the country.
Yes, and read some other articles as to how California now regrets ever having taking the money. They now are so far in debt as to considering abandoning the entire venture without anything actually working. BTW the bill for the high speed rail system in California is now up to $69 Billion and so far nothing has really happened.
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Old 02-23-2013, 08:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by OHKID View Post
To the OP, the closest comparison is Wyoming. Mariemont is more like Upper Arlington or Grandview Heights. Amberley Village may be more like Bexley though, or even Oakley within the city (although Oakley's demographic is more similar to German Village).

As far as this 3C's battle royale tangent which was started earlier, I believe Columbus knocks Cincinnati for a loop culturally in more traditional phrasing of the word "cultural". Columbus has two clear cultural districts - the Short North (artistic/creative) and German Village (German). Cincinnati has numerous more neighborhoods which can be considered artistic, yes, but none are quite to the par of Short North as a pure arts district. Additionally, Cincinnati lacks a true ethnic neighborhood.

However, in volume of affluent individuals which live in an urban neighborhood, Cincinnati has more. Cincinnati also has more demand for urban housing and downtown living per capita, probably due to the more creative nature of its workforce.
Cincinnati has a cultural heritage on a much higher level than Columbus. For example, Cincinnati Pops is second only to Boston in the country, and the Symphony Orchestra has a great reputation (though not as good as Cleveland's). I guess you are thinking of "culture" as in having a strong community of contemporary artists, which given the youth of Columbus might be true. But the old money in Cincinnati (older than Columbus's existence) has long supported a rich cultural tradition in the city, which in its heyday was the 5th largest city in the country, and the cultural center west of the eastern seaboard. This also has given Cincinnati a much higher caliber collection of art museums than Columbus. (Cincinnati Art Museum (one of the oldest in the US), Contemporary Arts Center, Taft Museum)

You are right about Cincinnati lacking any neighborhoods dominated by an immigrant community. Though AFAIK German Village is no more German than several Cincinnati neighborhoods. Over-the-Rhine, obviously (because of the name), used to be proudly German, but then anti-German hysteria struck with WWI, and subsequently various demographic shifts took place.
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Old 02-23-2013, 08:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Yes, and read some other articles as to how California now regrets ever having taking the money. They now are so far in debt as to considering abandoning the entire venture without anything actually working. BTW the bill for the high speed rail system in California is now up to $69 Billion and so far nothing has really happened.
The tracks already exist for the planned Ohio line, in case you were trying to draw parallels, but I know you are too smart for that.
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Old 02-23-2013, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Originally Posted by natininja View Post
The tracks already exist for the planned Ohio line, in case you were trying to draw parallels, but I know you are too smart for that.
But the existing tracks for the planned OHIO line are not high speed, but medium speed. I just don't think people are going to rush for a train to Cleveland which takes more time than a car up I-71. The only reason I can see is a free ticket paid for by public money. But that seems to be the direction we are heading.
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Old 02-23-2013, 09:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
But the existing tracks for the planned OHIO line are not high speed, but medium speed. I just don't think people are going to rush for a train to Cleveland which takes more time than a car up I-71. The only reason I can see is a free ticket paid for by public money. But that seems to be the direction we are heading.
People from Cincinnati would be more likely to travel to Dayton or Columbus than Cleveland, so the point you made is not useful. I would think people from Dayton would be very likely to use it, as it would enable them to go to Columbus or Cincinnati in a reasonable amount of time, while being able to nap, play on their phones, work, or read instead of having to deal with traffic. Ohio State students would also use it a lot to get between their home towns and school. Columbusites (and Daytonians) could use it to go to DC, NYC, Boston, Chicago, etc., on Amtrak, which they currently can't do.

People could park-and-ride in Sharonville to commute downtown. People in Dayton could use it to commute to Wright-Paterson, which was to get a stop.

It would have spurred sustainable development (not the Liberty Town Centre/Austin Landing stuff you hate) around its suburban stops and even in the West End in Cincinnati and the other C's downtowns.

Looking at the end-to-end trips as defining the line is missing the whole point. Over a long distance, you are likely to lose too much time competitiveness (without HSR) for the stress-free freedom-to-multitask that rail travel unlocks. But if you look at the shorter trips, people are willing to give up a little speed in exchange for freedom from the driver's seat. consider a 30-minute commute (variable with traffic) from Sharonville to Downtown versus a 45-minute commute (invariable with traffic) which you can nap for 30 minutes of, or work on your laptop for 35-40 minutes of, etc... It would actually open up the rational possibility of commuting from Dayton to Cincinnati, since you could snooze or work during the long commute.
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Old 02-23-2013, 09:48 PM
 
Location: canada
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I thought OTR would be like German Village but now I know otherwise.

I was wondering about WW 2 and the German heritage. In Canada , a city name was changed from a german one to an English one.

Light and high speed rail is amazing. I used it when I lived in Calgary and have used it in Europe.
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Old 02-23-2013, 10:03 PM
 
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In Over-the-Rhine (and other parts of Cincy), many old German street names were changed to English ones shortly after the US got involved in WWI (or French, in the case of Montreal Street).

Quote:
The United States’ declaration of war on Germany in April 1917 resulted in a tragic display of hysteria directed against everything and anything German. In Cincinnati, German teachers were dismissed from public schools, German Professors were censored, German collections and publications were removed from circulation at the Public Library, businesses with German names were “Americanized” and, by police order, only English language public meetings could be held.
As a result of the anti-German hysteria during World War I, name changing became the rage. The Cincinnati City Council followed the trend by changing German street names on April 1918. Among those changed were:
  • German Street to English Street
  • Bismarck Street to Montreal Street
  • Berlin Street to Woodrow Street
  • Bremen Street to Republic Street
  • Brunswick Street to Edgecliff Point
  • Frankfort Street to Stonewall Street
  • Hanover Street to Merrimac Street
  • Schumann Street to Meredith Street
  • Vienna Street to Panama Street
  • Humboldt Street to Taft Road
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