U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-23-2013, 11:39 PM
 
Location: NKY's Campbell Co.
1,821 posts, read 3,909,002 times
Reputation: 853

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by OHKID View Post
To the OP, the closest comparison is Wyoming. Mariemont is more like Upper Arlington or Grandview Heights. Amberley Village may be more like Bexley though, or even Oakley within the city (although Oakley's demographic is more similar to German Village).
Of course, no one place translates exactly into another locale. I think the Mariemont and Grandview Heights comparison is accurate. I would not consider Bexley, which is rather old compared to "newer" Wyoming, which has good portions of its housing stock post-WWII.

I thought Mariemont because of its historical central town area. If you lump Terrace Park, which is also in Mariemont schools, it becomes clearer. Of course, Terrace Park lacks the access that much of Bexley has in terms of walkability. I cannot think of a good UA comparison in Cincinnati. Oakley and Hyde Park are close to Bexley, though they are not separate from the main metro city like Bexley is. They are also part of CPS, which can be hit or miss (plus the unusual stress of trying to get your kid into the better schools in the 9-12 grade levels, at least that seems to be the case in my mind). Which begs a quick question, is CPS still in zoned high schools like their elementary and K-8 buildings, or are all high schools based on admission by selection process? Just curious.

Amberly is nothing like Bexley. Not one piece of commercial in Amberly. Most lots are easily 1/2 acre+, most 1 acre+.

Part of the comparison problems here lie with Cincinnati's terrain. The river and its tributary valleys can make it hard to design flat, open plats which most of Columbus, new and historic, is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-24-2013, 12:22 AM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,527,360 times
Reputation: 687
No schools in Ohio are zoned (within a municipality); that has been ruled unconstitutional. It is easier to get into a good high school than grade school. Grade schools can require camping out in front of the school to get an enrollment slot. High schools, I only really know about Walnut Hills, but Walnut has a not-very-difficult-at-all admissions test (if you test at grade level, you pass), and accepts anyone who passes it. It's ranked the best public high school in the state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,847,425 times
Reputation: 5488
Quote:
Originally Posted by maplelady View Post
the inter-city rivalry in the big 3 C cities in Ohio. Would one not want to visit the state capital..or the lakefront coast ? Just sayin'.
I wouldn't worry about it so much. There are only a few people who have some kind of issue and are threatened by any comparison. All the cities have their own strengths and weaknesses, so I would just visit and see what attracts you more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,847,425 times
Reputation: 5488
Quote:
Originally Posted by natininja View Post
There was a planned and funded rail line connecting the 3C's, which the current governor ran against and killed when he was elected. One large part of public sentiment against it was due to people downplaying the other cities in the state as worthy destinations. It's very silly. I like all the 3C's, but I definitely do have an idea of which I think is the best.

Cincinnati is seen by the others as provincial and conservative. Columbus is seen as a boring, bland town propped up by state government and the university. Cleveland is seen as a has-been industrial town turned complete ghetto (i.e. Ohio's Detroit).
Those all seem to be undeserved reputations from my pov, but it's pretty clear that there are people within these cities that are fully willing to spread them at every opportunity. It neither helps the city or state.

And I also seem to remember that the 3-C criticism mostly came from the fact that it was not actually high-speed. Proposals in the 1980s and 1990s were both far superior. I still think Kasich was wrong to have passed on the money, but it's nothing new for him. He's made it his personal mission to kill mass transit in Ohio.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 01:11 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,847,425 times
Reputation: 5488
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHKID View Post
To the OP, the closest comparison is Wyoming. Mariemont is more like Upper Arlington or Grandview Heights. Amberley Village may be more like Bexley though, or even Oakley within the city (although Oakley's demographic is more similar to German Village).

As far as this 3C's battle royale tangent which was started earlier, I believe Columbus knocks Cincinnati for a loop culturally in more traditional phrasing of the word "cultural". Columbus has two clear cultural districts - the Short North (artistic/creative) and German Village (German). Cincinnati has numerous more neighborhoods which can be considered artistic, yes, but none are quite to the par of Short North as a pure arts district. Additionally, Cincinnati lacks a true ethnic neighborhood.

However, in volume of affluent individuals which live in an urban neighborhood, Cincinnati has more. Cincinnati also has more demand for urban housing and downtown living per capita, probably due to the more creative nature of its workforce.
Not sure how you figure this, exactly. If you got just by population growth, downtown Columbus is growing faster. There is strong demand in both cities, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 01:15 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,847,425 times
Reputation: 5488
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Yes, and read some other articles as to how California now regrets ever having taking the money. They now are so far in debt as to considering abandoning the entire venture without anything actually working. BTW the bill for the high speed rail system in California is now up to $69 Billion and so far nothing has really happened.
Vastly different situation. First, Califonia was in deep debt long before the HSR project. Second, their terrain is significantly different than Ohio's and costs much more to build anything, let alone a rail line. They also have to build for seismic activity, another concern Ohio doesn't have and which raises costs. Third, they have complex building and development codes, high taxes and labor costs.

And why does no one ever bat an eye when highway construction costs soar?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,847,425 times
Reputation: 5488
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
But the existing tracks for the planned OHIO line are not high speed, but medium speed. I just don't think people are going to rush for a train to Cleveland which takes more time than a car up I-71. The only reason I can see is a free ticket paid for by public money. But that seems to be the direction we are heading.
A true high-speed line would've not produced longer trips than a car.

And rail is far less subsidized with public money than road construction, and it's not close.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top