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Old 02-24-2013, 12:55 PM
 
Location: canada
294 posts, read 408,597 times
Reputation: 61

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Yes, i have looked at the realtor's sheets on that one.

I just found another cute area. Happines, Frolic and Merrymaker in Deer Park, behind Jewish Hospital, the streeets are mid century and pristine, look as if they were built yesterday.The yards are immaculate. A nicely preserved and intact area.

Any house on Fair Oaks I love. It is amzing how it is insulated from the Reading road issue. I love these classic house, with large lots , mature trees, and level lots. The one on the corner of Section and fair oaks looks like it might be a new build or a really well done re-model. I can see how this would be prime re bulid area.
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Old 02-24-2013, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,991,260 times
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WASP families have always been few and far between in Amberley Village. Housing covenants and "unwritten laws" meant that not many Jewish people high up the economic ladder found themselves in Indian Hill or Glendale. They therefore treated Amberley as the pinnacle of their residential aspirations. And why not? Besides the manor-like dwellings along Section Rd and some side streets, most of the houses were sprawling ranch-style abodes on sweeping lawns. (McMansions came to town only when the Rollman Estates development gobbled up one of the last large open tracts in town. This was during the late '90s.) Not that that mattered much after WWII, since Tudor houses and real mansions were seen by many as "old" when "new" was what was cool. With Amberley Village the higher-echelon Jews of Cincinnati had it all. Its ties to the city schools meant that their children could still take the Walnut Hills High admission test and go to the same school they attended. The old synagogues of Avondale (Adath Israel and Rockdale foremost among them) had mostly relocated into that very village. Many other community institutions - Weil Funeral Home, Bilker's delicatessen - were still not far away on Reading Rd. The JCC was right over in Roselawn, which quite a few of the families had moved from (or "escaped," depending on point of view.) Jew-friendly and Jew-only country clubs were close at hand. So a cool reception from the old-money Glendaleans and the newer-money WASP's of Indian Hill didn't mean too much. Even now, with Jewish Hospital transplanted to Kenwood and Bilker's gone forever after a short stint in Blue Ash and Weil Funeral Home also in "Jew Ash" and so on, Amberley Village continues to be one of the hubs of Jewish life in the area. How can it not be, with so many temples within the village boundaries and the JCC now there too?
Point being, after all that: In Cincinnati code, saying you're from Amberley automatically signals "I'm Jewish." No small number of Catholic families with sufficient income has also always made their homes there as well. And who's to say that some Protestants or "none of the above" have been in the mix too? But that's why Amberley hasn't shown up on a list of communities where a WASP would've grown up during the '60s and '70s.

No matter what the city, it's far from unusual to have noticeably differing communities bump up against each other, when they date back before WWII. Amberley's sharing boundaries with middle-class Roselawn and blue-collar Golf Manor is no anomaly. You see this also in Hempstead, New York and Oak Park, Illinois, among other places. Come to think of it, even in Greater Cincinnati it's in effect in more than one area.
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Old 02-24-2013, 01:53 PM
 
Location: canada
294 posts, read 408,597 times
Reputation: 61
Default Enlighten me

Yup, I did my research about the history of enclaves off Reading Road. I knew why Amberley wasn'r mentioned, but I do love those houses so much. it seems not to have suffered one bit from the sad story of Reading Road.Yes, I see all the huge temple complexes off E. Galbraith. How I wish the magnificent temple on Reading was still a Jewish museum or something. It just took my breath away when I came across it.

I do have questions about the written and unwritten laws you mentioned. Holy cow ! This must be tradition. Really, country clubs can exclude people based on religion? That shocks me.

It really amazes me that entire communities continue to be bastions of race, religion, etc. I understand while people want to live with others they share culture with . I mean in Chicago there are large Irish founding communities and large Polish communities and white and black, but really there are also many newer groups such as South American , etc. I understand that people want to live near their houses of worship, cultural norms, tradtional foods, etc. But today, in Cincy would I have trouble if I wanted to buy a house in Amberley and I were a Hindu ? Or would that be considered some form of 21 centruy block busting ?
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Old 02-24-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: canada
294 posts, read 408,597 times
Reputation: 61
How long has it been since there have been race and religion clauses in written covenants ?


I hate to sound so naive but thet actually stated "No Jews ( or blacks )" for Indian Hill and other areas. I don't like section 8 or bussing or other attempts like scattered sight housing , but i can't get my head around exclusionary covenants.

I guess what you are gently trying to tell me Goyboy is that Doris day would never make lemonade on Fair Oaks Drive.

I know Cleveland is west side mostly white and many Irish and Eastern European and that the east side was historically Jewish enclaves and more black in areas plus the large tracts of WASP but I think Shaker was know for diversity. ( for those who could pay ) but I did not get the impression it was so defined as I am learning Cincy is/was.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:11 AM
 
Location: canada
294 posts, read 408,597 times
Reputation: 61
Default Wyoming

I am changing my mind about Wyoming.The area around Poplar and Burns is exactly the time of place my grandparents and parents would have settled. Love it. Must explore this more. Now I see why people had me pinned as a Wyoming girl. One must never discount the expertise of this group. I do also love the Milford location.

I was looking further west before, at the cul de sacs with the 1960 yellowish brink ranches and some mid century mod attempts.

I also like some Dayton areas( Bellbrook) but my family are all baseball fanatics ( except me ) so Cincy would have been better.
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Old 02-25-2013, 07:59 PM
 
181 posts, read 232,189 times
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Since you've mentioned Dayton and Bellbrook, what are your thoughts concerning Centerville or Oakwood? Both are very nice areas, with Centerville being more suburban. Oakwood is fairly "upscale" and has some very nice houses. I'm not up on architectural styles but I guess you'd call some of the homes in Oakwood of the Tudor style.
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Old 02-25-2013, 09:16 PM
 
Location: canada
294 posts, read 408,597 times
Reputation: 61
Oakwood blew my mind when i first looked at it. I was looking for Brown Street where Martin Sheen grew up. I don't think he grew up on the wealthy end. Don't know.

I love Centreville. Someone just posted a like to the 1950's era developments by Zengler, Huber etc. I love the ads for them. Love me my 1950 ranch like in Pleasant Hill. I think Phil Donahue's old house on Cushwa may be my fav model of Zengler. I remember him boasting about the fireplace in the middle betweeen living room and dining. Look at that Catholic Church he and neighbour Erma Bombebeck helped build. it is so fururistic that it really evokes a bygone era.

I gotta get overe to the Dayton board soon.

Ohio amazes me.. The famous people born there. I think I read somewhere that 1 in 7 Americans was born in Ohio. And most of them were raised in those little Capes and WW 2 era bungalows by parents who built the nation.
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Old 02-26-2013, 12:24 AM
 
181 posts, read 232,189 times
Reputation: 218
I lived in Centerville years ago. Brown Street, from the University of Dayton area heading south is fairly nice. Dayton's famous old school steak place, The Pine Club, is in the area. As you head south on Brown, it becomes Oakwood Ave. and takes you through the heart of Oakwood. Very nice, older homes with lots of trees. Oakwood has a little upscale shopping area with another famous Dayton institution, The Oakwood Club. The Oakwood Club is a little nicer and more updated than The Pine Club with a more varied menu but The Pine Club has been around for a long time and is known across the U.S. for it's prime beef. An interesting hometown market is also in the area, The Dorothy Lane Market. Oakwood Ave. becomes Far Hills Ave. and takes you through Kettering and eventually into Centerville. At this point, you're not far from Bellbrook.

I miss the area from time to time. The rolling hills, hardwood treed areas, and older houses are very appealing. It's really too bad parts of Dayton are not doing well economically, with the downturn in the economy, including the closing of the large GM operation. I've traveled throughout the U.S. over the years and lived in different parts of the country. My personal opinion is that Ohio, in general, is under appreciated for it's natural beauty and down-to-earth culture. It's not as dramatic as some areas you'll see elsewhere, such as in California, but Ohio, and especially the southwestern area, including Cincinnati, has a subtle charm and beauty all it's own.
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