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Old 02-24-2013, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati, OH
148 posts, read 168,428 times
Reputation: 67

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Attracting the best and brightest professionals to Cincinnati increases productivity and profits of Cincy's corporate HQ's, in turn creating more jobs and strengthening the economic engine both short and long term. What could be more important than that?

Cincinnati is like a "mini Chicago" in all the good ways- by a significant margin over all other midwestern cities. I lived on the mag mile / gold coast for 15 years and commuted to NYC, Calif., TX, FL, so I know. Best and brightest want a world-class urban setting first and foremost. Cincy has that (barely, but could explode, I'll explain later). Cols. no, Cleve. no, Pburg isolated and no future, Indy no, Lex/Lou no.

Ok the mini-chgo list- masterfully developed waterfront to live/work/play. Fortune-500 professional ambition desiring upward mobility. 2 years ago I moved here and was pleasantly surprised that women stay current with haircuts and fashion. I remember Cols. being frumpy, and Cleve. negative and selfish. In a sentence- Cincy professionals, like Chgo., work extremely hard on their appearance and their career, and expect to be rewarded for that, or they will move on because they know it's available in NYC, DC, Chgo, LA, SF.

For years the best and brightest from the Big-10 have been moving to Chgo, get excellent corporate careers, and live in Lincoln Park. Later they raise families out in the burbs, but the seminal growth years are in Lincoln Park.

Walnut Hills (and/or East Walnut Hills) and Evanston should be Cincy's Lincoln Park, but it's not, and that is a serious handicap to Cincinnati. Why Walnut Hills- same reasons as Lincoln Park. Location, location, and direction. Closest residential neighborhood to downtown in the direction of money. And on the main line. Hyde Park (the nicest part) and Mt. Lookout are forbiddingly difficult to get in/out, a logistical nightmare. Demographically that's my fit, but I hesitate to move there, because I do not want to be off the beaten path and boxed in to boot.

Walnut Hills/Evanston have the perfect physical barrier (I-71) to keep out the property-destroying druggies, hustlers, thugs, hangers-outers, whatever you call them they are a problem, and they are impeding Cincinnati's progress. Cincinnati needs to stop *****-footing around, stop allowing the squatters (or whatever they are) hold the area hostage, and let the free market reclaim this valuable territory.

Something abnormal is going on there. On election day, I was driving around researching neighborhoods to move to. Hyde park looked as expected- mostly professionals, mostly at work, quiet and orderly as you would want that time of day. As I approached Evanston I started getting excited realizing its location value- straight shot downtown, proximity to amenities of Hyde Park, literally on I-71 for business drives to Mason, Cols., Dayton, CVG. Then disappointment and disbelief seeing the yard clutter/trash, the porch hangers-outers, the thugs blocking traffic, car doors open swilling 40's, and every single lawn (100's of them) had that blue Obama sign, and I mean every lawn. That's not organic. That's organized and unnatural. Finally I was sad and angry, "cannot believe the previous owners of this valuable location let themselves get pushed out." In Chicago the police protect strategic locations like that with a vengeance, because they know who butters their bread. Not so around here, for some reason.

Last edited by 5thgencincy; 02-24-2013 at 12:34 PM..
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Old 02-24-2013, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,729,880 times
Reputation: 2058
interesting post. i have often said that someday walnut hills will be the most expensive zip code in the city. i have no idea when though.

on evanston, i have always found it to be a solid lower middle-class area. it is full of hard-working people and its residents are able to live close to where they work. sure it has some problems with crime, but why would we want to kill off an affordable neighborhood near to the city to have another sterile upper-middle class area?
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Old 02-24-2013, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati, OH
148 posts, read 168,428 times
Reputation: 67
progmac- thanks for educating me re: Evanston, I did not know that, although it does not match my visual recollection.
Was my writing so violent as to indicate I would advocate a "killing off"? If so, I need to invest in even more written communication skills.
My bottom line is- as long as the playing field is level, with no unnatural barriers to free market dynamics, I have no problem.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,729,880 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thgencincy View Post
progmac- thanks for educating me re: Evanston, I did not know that, although it does not match my visual recollection.
Was my writing so violent as to indicate I would advocate a "killing off"? If so, I need to invest in even more written communication skills.
My bottom line is- as long as the playing field is level, with no unnatural barriers to free market dynamics, I have no problem.
"Killing off" - a funny phrase. Literally, it sounds so violent. I didn't mean it like that. I was just intending the usual colloquialism for dramatic change.

I didn't find your description to be outside of my experience with the place. But it only captured part of it. Like describing robust indian food as 'smelly.' Well, it is smelly, but it is also other things.

At this point, I fear I've dragged us off topic in any case.

I think in terms of attracting the well-educated, upward-mobile individuals that you are referring to, it is absolutely critical to have an urban, chic, and frankly, gentrified city. Hyde park alone doesn't cut it, not by any stretch. The big fish downtown invested big in a development group (3 CDC) that would dedicate itself to gentrifying Over-the-Rhine. A primary rationale was to provide the sort of place to live that "top talent" would find appealing.
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,576 posts, read 2,303,702 times
Reputation: 651
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thgencincy View Post

Something abnormal is going on there. On election day, I was driving around researching neighborhoods to move to. Hyde park looked as expected- mostly professionals, mostly at work, quiet and orderly as you would want that time of day. As I approached Evanston I started getting excited realizing its location value- straight shot downtown, proximity to amenities of Hyde Park, literally on I-71 for business drives to Mason, Cols., Dayton, CVG. Then disappointment and disbelief seeing the yard clutter/trash, the porch hangers-outers, the thugs blocking traffic, car doors open swilling 40's, and every single lawn (100's of them) had that blue Obama sign, and I mean every lawn. That's not organic. That's organized and unnatural.
I see nothing wrong with that. I drive through Amberley village and seen mostly Romney signs. I don't come on a forum and say that it was a disappointment.
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Old 02-25-2013, 06:51 AM
 
5,648 posts, read 8,756,498 times
Reputation: 2357
5thgencincy.

Kansas City seems to attract lazy people with soft dull minds and also the lowest common denominator in our society. The trashy behavior of a significant number of the people that I see here regardless of their income level and education is proof of this. I am thankful that Cincinnati appears to have a bright future and is now attracting educated i.e. more open minded people. This is precisely why I am hoping to increase my own investment in the area. It does not seem to have the same kind of culture or mindset that you find in the Kansas City region.

Side note. Pittsburgh is actually starting to take off just like Cincinnati. It is not that isolated at all with Cleveland being two hours away and Columbus about three hours. And a drive to Philly is about five hours if I recall correctly.
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:57 PM
 
130 posts, read 270,400 times
Reputation: 148
If we are comparing Cincinnati with just Cleveland, Columbus, Pittsburgh (questionable), Louisville, and Lexington, I agree with the OP's main point. However, I believe that Cincinnati falls short compared to larger, more dynamic metro areas such as Atlanta, Dallas, Denver, Minneapolis and Seattle. Also, Chicago is light years ahead of Cincinnati -- a comparison between the two is laughable.

Do I think Cincinnati has much untapped potential? Having lived here for two years (but moving on soon), I believe that to be the case. Will she realize her potential long-term? Time will tell, but I am not convinced.

To WILWRadio, I lived in Kansas City for two years prior to moving to Cincinnati, and as a native east-coaster, I believe that the two metro areas are actually very similar.
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Old 02-25-2013, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati, OH
148 posts, read 168,428 times
Reputation: 67
IMO Cincinnati's best (and only) hope for significant advancement, or even to prevent a slow demise, is to leverage the bejeezus out of P&G's branding leadership position, while we still can. That is the only truly unique advantage this city has over others. And the potential is unlimited, if it takes hold.

Here's my plan: Make Cincinnati a destination city by building a huge convention center, ala McCormick center in Chicago. This convention center will become ground-zero of the "Branding Capital of the World", hosting an annual summit anchored by the inventor and still reigning champion of branding, P&G.

Branding is hotter than ever (eg. "personal branding"), and has even more potential than I will disclose in this public forum.

Chicago, LA, and NYC had their large bodies of water to help then become destinations. We don't have that, but we have just enough of one to accompany the branding summit.

Cincinnati needs a big idea like this to hang its hat on, not a bunch of tiny ideas like the current plan (most of which are just "redistribution" plans).

Last edited by 5thgencincy; 02-25-2013 at 07:05 PM..
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Old 02-25-2013, 09:36 PM
 
5,648 posts, read 8,756,498 times
Reputation: 2357
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonToKC View Post
If we are comparing Cincinnati with just Cleveland, Columbus, Pittsburgh (questionable), Louisville, and Lexington, I agree with the OP's main point. However, I believe that Cincinnati falls short compared to larger, more dynamic metro areas such as Atlanta, Dallas, Denver, Minneapolis and Seattle. Also, Chicago is light years ahead of Cincinnati -- a comparison between the two is laughable.

Do I think Cincinnati has much untapped potential? Having lived here for two years (but moving on soon), I believe that to be the case. Will she realize her potential long-term? Time will tell, but I am not convinced.

To WILWRadio, I lived in Kansas City for two years prior to moving to Cincinnati, and as a native east-coaster, I believe that the two metro areas are actually very similar.
***The German heritage of both areas is evidently the biggest similarity that I see. But aside from that I see few similarities between Cincy and KC. KC is more influenced by west coast and southwest culture. Cincy is more Midwestern and Southern with some eastern influences in its culture. KC is not at all Conservative contrary to popular opinion. Cincy OTOH is a fairly Conservative city with some pockets of liberalism mixed into some neighborhoods and suburbs. People in Cincy are better educated as a recent study that I read pointed out Cincy is one of the most literate cities in the country. KC is not.

In any event, if I find I have a lot of the same bad experiences in Cincy that I had in KC, I will not hesitate to relocate to an area that friends have recommended where I know that the problems will cease. I have spent a fair amount of time in the Cincy area over the years and overall my experiences there have been far better than in KC. Time will tell...
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Old 02-26-2013, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 530,004 times
Reputation: 275
Quote:
(100's of them) had that blue Obama sign, and I mean every lawn. That's not organic. That's organized and unnatural.
OH NO! Someone actually believes something different than you, the horror the HORROR!


...And people wonder why Cincy has a hard time attracting the best and brightest in spite of all of its assets

Last edited by neilworms2; 02-26-2013 at 09:12 AM..
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