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Old 03-07-2013, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,845,896 times
Reputation: 924

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Links to what, some self-proclaimed expert telling me what it going to happen?
I thought not. It's just more of the world according to kjbrill.

BTW - I have posted numerous links showing shifting trends back into the inner cities. It's reality, you can face it or not. Does that mean the suburbs will dry up and blow away? Nope. It does mean there is a growing trend in this country where American cities are coming back from decline and are in demand again. That Cincinnati is catching the trend is great for everyone in the metro.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,420,983 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
I thought not. It's just more of the world according to kjbrill.

BTW - I have posted numerous links showing shifting trends back into the inner cities. It's reality, you can face it or not. Does that mean the suburbs will dry up and blow away? Nope. It does mean there is a growing trend in this country where American cities are coming back from decline and are in demand again. That Cincinnati is catching the trend is great for everyone in the metro.
I don't disagree with that. A strong innner city also makes for a strong Metro. I just disagree when some suggests the sububs are just going to dry up and go away. There is just no way that is going to happen. Too many people have their financial future pegged on the suburbs to permit that to happen. And by the way those same people control most of the personal income in the Metro area. They will be known with their biggest voice - their vote.

We can square off and that is OK. But please acknowledge there are reasons why the surbubanites make the decisions they do. I was born in the suburbs, Deer Park, grew up in the suburbs, Madeira, lived there for several years, and then moved to Mason. I am a dyed in the wool confirmed suburbanite, and at my age, 73, (hopefuly) have little doubt I will live out my life in suburbia. From what I see happening, I have little reason to believe I will not live out my suburban lifestyle in Mason. Things are always subject to change, but I believe I can survive this.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,845,896 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I just disagree when some suggests the sububs are just going to dry up and go away.
To be sure, I never made that suggestion, I do think that perhaps others have. But I don't think the suburbs are going anywhere. Suburbs can fall into decline, the same as cities can, but I see that more as a cyclical reality influenced by many factors, and not due to cities becoming desirable again.

As I've stated before, I have no animosity towards people living anywhere they see fit. I've personally lived in the two largest cities in America, various small towns, suburbs, and in the country. I understand the merits of places I've lived. Where I am now is simply what I prefer, same as you.

We are on the same page. I am surprised we argue so much, but it seems to be what we enjoy. Just know there is nothing personal from me in our debates. Perhaps, that gets lost across the internet from time to time. That and I am a direct person.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:26 PM
 
291 posts, read 298,313 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
We are getting closer and close to the release of the new metro and Consolidated statistical area's.(June 6th)

Cincinnati and Dayton looks closer and closer to being official a CSA.
What are the commuting percentages between Hamilton County and Montgomery County, and vice versa?
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,029,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pontiac51 View Post
What are the commuting percentages between Hamilton County and Montgomery County, and vice versa?
Hi pontiac51--

Low to none, I would venture. However, commuting between the other counties in either metro area - say, living in Warren County and commuting north to Montgomery County - happens a lot more, especially as the suburbs continue to grow.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Low to none, I would venture.
Source.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:34 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,526,216 times
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I think the argument people make is not that suburbs will dry up, but that suburbs will begin to face the same problems as cities: aging infrastructure, decreasing property values, poverty, and crime. The main effect this will have on current suburbanites is a new wave of white/wealth flight to more subdivided farmland. I don't know how this can continue indefinitely, though. I think the suburbs will either have to morph into something resembling the New Urbanist vision, or the greater and greater ratio of infrastructure to population and its economic demands will thoroughly bankrupt the country.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,578 posts, read 2,312,763 times
Reputation: 651
Quote:
Originally Posted by pontiac51 View Post
What are the commuting percentages between Hamilton County and Montgomery County, and vice versa?
Since you seem to know, show us and a link. I already pointed out several sources in other threads.
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Old 03-07-2013, 06:01 PM
 
291 posts, read 298,313 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Source.
The source should be census.gov, but for some reason I can't pull up the county-to-county commuting information.
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Old 03-07-2013, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,845,896 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by pontiac51 View Post
The source should be census.gov, but for some reason I can't pull up the county-to-county commuting information.
No worries and I appreciate your effort.

I found hensleya's assumption baseless and devoid of reality. I had really hoped he would provide verification.
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