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Old 03-22-2013, 07:08 AM
 
1,130 posts, read 2,025,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
Also there was no forum to vent back then as they do now on the internet.

Incase you want to look up stats. http://news.cincinnati.com/interacti...20409502581066
I still don't get your point. These numbers bear out exactly what I am saying. Overall crime is up 39%, serious crime is up nearly 7%. I don't believe for a moment that 15 years ago people chose not to report crime, and now suddenly do because "they" have moved into the neighborhood. That's ridiculous.
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:50 AM
 
111 posts, read 148,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohiogirl81 View Post
of all the things there are to worry about in the world .... Anderson township declining is not one of them.
+1000
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:41 PM
 
528 posts, read 577,801 times
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It's no coincidence the city centers are actually starting to make a comeback and adding residents while the suburbs closest to the city centers are declining. For the most part Section 8 housing has taken that burden off the city centers and dumped it on the burbs. Section 8 is actually a much better solution to low income housing than the old HUD projects of the 50's and 60's. The problem is trying to find the perfect balance, some communities have a high percentage while others have close to nothing.
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Old 04-11-2013, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xjken View Post
It's no coincidence the city centers are actually starting to make a comeback and adding residents while the suburbs closest to the city centers are declining. For the most part Section 8 housing has taken that burden off the city centers and dumped it on the burbs. Section 8 is actually a much better solution to low income housing than the old HUD projects of the 50's and 60's. The problem is trying to find the perfect balance, some communities have a high percentage while others have close to nothing.
What specific city centers are you referencing? OTR is a prime example of a rejuvenation within the City of Cincinnati. But look at the actual numbers, take them as a percentage of the City population. Yes they are positive and good. At the same time they have yet to equal to the numbers leaving the City.

What I consider suburbs, such as Hyde Park, Oakley, Mt Lookout, have been doing well. But I get a kick out of developments such as Oakley Station which are importing the suburban big box stores, the suburban apartment complex scales, and the rest into the middle of the City. I see the suburban lifestyle being imported into the City. How can you call it anything else?
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
At the same time they have yet to equal to the numbers leaving the City.
What would those numbers be?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
What I consider suburbs, such as Hyde Park, Oakley, Mt Lookout, have been doing well. But I get a kick out of developments such as Oakley Station which are importing the suburban big box stores, the suburban apartment complex scales, and the rest into the middle of the City. I see the suburban lifestyle being imported into the City. How can you call it anything else?
It's anything but a suburban lifestyle. Those areas are inner city Cincinnati - neighborhoods. Same goes with U Spuare at the Loop in Clifton Heights. Several chains are moving in. Does that make the neighborhood and the development any less urban? I'm of the opinion that it doesn't, but you can call it whatever makes you happy.

I can't really say that I am a fan of the architecture, or of the developments we are talking about. Especially if the push Mom and Pop businesses out. I guess it is what it is.

BTW - good to see you active on the forums again. Hope all is well.
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:54 AM
 
5,318 posts, read 6,622,488 times
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Originally Posted by bertwrench View Post
Of course I'm biased because I live in Anderson Twp, but I don't see any decline.

Take a ride thru Summit Estates (Beechmont & 8 Mile road area) if you want to see decline. I lived there in the 1980s and could not believe some of the run down homes there now when I recently went back to visit. The house at Hilltree and Shenstone is falling apart.
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Old 04-11-2013, 12:20 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,521,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
What specific city centers are you referencing? OTR is a prime example of a rejuvenation within the City of Cincinnati. But look at the actual numbers, take them as a percentage of the City population. Yes they are positive and good. At the same time they have yet to equal to the numbers leaving the City.

What I consider suburbs, such as Hyde Park, Oakley, Mt Lookout, have been doing well. But I get a kick out of developments such as Oakley Station which are importing the suburban big box stores, the suburban apartment complex scales, and the rest into the middle of the City. I see the suburban lifestyle being imported into the City. How can you call it anything else?
I agree with most of this, but I don't know what the point is. I guess you're trying to say the suburbs are so awesome and successful that the city is trying to emulate them? The city has been trying to import the suburbs for 70ish years now. Finally, it has slowed down, which is a large part of why OTR, Downtown, and CUF are booming. They are tucking away parking and ceasing use of suburban design standards, and it's increasing their competitiveness on the residential and commercial real estate markets.

Oakley Station is inertia from what has been going on for our entire lives. It's not some sort of new concession that suburban development is awesome; that's been the philosophy the city has followed throughout its decline. Trying to beat the burbs at their own game is a recipe for failure. Especially since the suburbs don't even win that game, once another suburb has newer houses and a newer mall to shop at (and newer (likely state or federally subsidized) infrastructure that requires less tax revenue to maintain).
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Old 04-11-2013, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
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My point is the people behind the money in locations such as Oakley Station go with what they consider a successful formula. They could care less whether it is called urban or suburban, they simply go with what people spend their money at, so it all tends to look alike.

Downtown, OTR and CUF are making the best use of available land. This simply makes common sense. But it is not like they are chucking suburban design standards. From what I can see they are maximizing the return on the investments they have to work with. To tear down old architecture and replace it with new would be stupid. The cost of materials plus the lack of available craftmanship would make this a losing proposition.

But I don't understand the contention the outer suburbs somehow benefit from a heavily subsidized infrastructure. Just what infrastructure are you speaking of? The majority of the access roads are existing roads. Very few new highways are built. Many of the existing roads, especially the two-lane ones, have a requirement for a business to locate along them the business has to pay the cost of an expansion lane. In the 37 years I haved lived here, Mason has done significant improvements to Mason Montgomery, Reading Rd, (Route 42) and Kings Mills Rds, mostly in recent years. Several of these were in conjunction with Deerfield Twp. reconstructing Mason Montgomery and Route 42 through their jurisdiction. In addition to these, the construction of Tylersville Rd through Mason itself, reconstruction of Western Row Rd through Mason, and Snider Rd were basically all Mason. Snider Rd through Mason proper was a brand new subdivision requring the road to be built, with the developers paying the cost, and Mason paying for an extension to connect the new road with the original Snider in Deerfield Twp. When I look at the sewer and water tape in fees for a new house it hardly seems subsidized to me. The cost of a building lot in Mason is heavily influenced by the tap in fees plus the cost of street construction added into the lot price.

I am very proud of the fact Mason has dredged up the money to improve our roads and the appearance of traveling through our city. It has definitely added some class to it. But please cite specific examples of how Mason has profited from state or federal subsidies. We all know that monies paid to the state, specifically Ohio State Income Tax, is returned to the localities by various avenues. If you have knowledge Mason has been receiving more than their fair share, please delineate it.
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Old 04-11-2013, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
To tear down old architecture and replace it with new would be stupid.
I couldn't agree more, but Cincinnati has a bad habit of demolishing anything they can. Addicted to federal money is what I've been told on the forums here. Much of the new construction in Corryville and Clifton Heights is new and has come at the expense of demolishing old buildings and putting up new, ugly, crap in it's place.
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Old 04-11-2013, 09:18 PM
 
912 posts, read 1,191,562 times
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Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
I couldn't agree more, but Cincinnati has a bad habit of demolishing anything they can. Addicted to federal money is what I've been told on the forums here. Much of the new construction in Corryville and Clifton Heights is new and has come at the expense of demolishing old buildings and putting up new, ugly, crap in it's place.
I guess this is one of the ways in which I get confused comparing Cincinnati to Memphis (where I'm from). I've read a few different times the complaints about Cincinnati tearing down old buildings and replacing them with new structures. Memphis has the reverse problem -- old buildings are left vacant for years and years (see: Sears Crosstown, Chisca Hotel, Sterick Building and I could really go on) until they are no longer able to be rehabbed without millions of dollars, if at all. Meanwhile, these enormous structures stay vacant for decades, inviting all kinds of crime and activity.

In my mind, I would prefer these buildings get rehabbed (in so long as it was reasonably cost-effective to do so). But if I had the next choice, I absolutely would want these buildings torn down and new buildings put in their places. I've seen what happens when you let buildings languish in neglect for decades. It's not pretty. Not pretty at all.
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