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Old 05-25-2013, 09:44 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,707 posts, read 6,575,440 times
Reputation: 7332

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It seams to me that nearly every thread in this forum, no matter what the topic, turns into a debate about the superiority/inferiority of various chosen living locations. Some prefer urban living, some prefer suburban living, and some want nothing to do with either one of those.

Although many people understand that there is not just one ideal location for everyone, there are people who post here who apparently cannot accept the fact that another living location might appeal to some people. Before long it becomes a "shouting" match about where is the only good place to live. It doesn't matter if the topic is development, schools, streetcars, interchanges, shopping, or guidance for someone moving to the area, the blind eyes soon start arguing about city/suburb superiority.

Perhaps the reason for this is that there is not a thread dedicated to that discussion. Maybe if all that discussion can take place here, the other threads can stay more on topic and remain interesting and informative for the original intended participants.

Shall we give it a try?

By the way, I fully understand that some people like city life and all that goes with it. Some prefer the generally larger open areas of the suburbs. I grew up on a 4 acre "farm" among mostly 80-240 acre farms. That is still my love, although I have been living in a small town since 1977. 8 Miles to work. Usually 10-15 minutes on the road, depending on the weather.
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Old 05-25-2013, 10:05 PM
 
307 posts, read 441,338 times
Reputation: 98
But then all other threads would cease to exist and what would be the fun in that?!?
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Old 05-26-2013, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
I seriously doubt whether this thread can remain on a truely debate level long enough for any meaningful discussion to occur. The human nature to claim superiority about one's life decisions rises to the top too quickly.
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Old 05-26-2013, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,946,405 times
Reputation: 6455
There's really no debate when there's merit to both sides. Accept that it's almost a given for people to stray from the topic at hand to expound on why their (sub)urban preference is superior. I see it going on here all the time. Even a discussion about Cincinnati gaslights devolved into bickering when somebody brought up that a few had been installed in a sprawl development. More importantly, if such an exchange were to occur what good would come from one faction's prevailing?
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Old 05-26-2013, 09:04 AM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,707 posts, read 6,575,440 times
Reputation: 7332
My thought was that if there was a place for such "discussion", everyone would be respectful enough to put that discussion here, rather than dropping every other interesting thread to the level of an "Everyone should live in a(n) ___________ environment and those that live in _____________ are simply ____________ (Place derogatory description of choice here).

Hopefully then the original discussion on the other topic can continue on a civil level, and those of us who are truly interested in that topic can continue to follow it rather than simply ignoring that entire thread.

I really don't care or desire for one faction to prevail, and I have no expectations of anyone "seeing the light" and becoming tolerant of opposing views.
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Old 05-26-2013, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
goyguy and rrtechno...

I agree with most of what you say. But all I see coming are nasty comments concerning whatever area someone comments on and a rapid deterioration in tone to where Yac shuts the thread down quickly. If Yac will permit nasties in this thread individually then bring it on. I think most people can see who is making valid comments about a given area or situation and who isn't. Let people form their opinions based on the attitude and tone of the respondents.

Cincinnati has some great urban and suburban areas. It also has some terrible and rapidly approaching terrible ones.

It would be nice if there could be a discussion concerning how to turn some areas of the City around and some areas which are not in the City but close to it. So I will attempt to kick off a discussion I hope can bring some useful dialogue. My topic is the West Side in general. It interests me since so many members of my father's family resided there when I was a youth, in places like College Hill, Delhi, etc. Excuse me if I don't always get names for connected areas. When I was young we just traveled there and I did not necessarily pay attention to what the area was called. I admit to having lost contact with much of the area, as most of my family members fled the area years ago. We also had a concentration of family in St Bernard, most of whom worked at P&G. They fled also. Their kids, closer to my age, in particular departed for further out suburbs. Once the older members passed on, I suddenly had no reason to visit most of the West Side or St Bernard.

My son lives on the West Side, in a subdivision off Kipling Ave. across from Mercy Hospital. He actually lives in the City since at the time they bought the new house his job required him to be a resident of Cincinnati. Both he and my DIL are approaching the point where they can retire in their jobs. Their kids are near the age of leaving the nest. I will admit I have told my son the first decent offer you get on your house take it and run for the hills. The degradation in their local neighborhood and along Colerain Ave is sickening. My son is the only one left I know who lives on the West Side, and our visits there become fewer and fewer as we age.

So my point is I remember when the West Side was a bulwark of life in Cincinnati, good solid families with good solid incomes. Don't claim to have all the answers, but I do recogize the age of a lot of the property makes it a target for low-cost landlords. That in itself is not bad unless they just milk the property and put nothing back into it.

If any of you have an idea as to how to resurrect the West Side, chime in here. This is not specifically urban versus suburban, but how to prevent a section of the Cincinnati area from totally collapsing. It is both inside the City and out, so should concern all.
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Old 05-26-2013, 12:39 PM
 
864 posts, read 1,197,974 times
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I think what really hurts the West side is that there seems to be a real lack of unique attractions. I can't think of any real West side business districts that can attract people the way Ludlow Ave., Hyde Park Square and Mt. Lookout Square do. People certainly aren't flocking to the big box stores along Glenway Avenue.
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Old 05-26-2013, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinciFan View Post
I think what really hurts the West side is that there seems to be a real lack of unique attractions. I can't think of any real West side business districts that can attract people the way Ludlow Ave., Hyde Park Square and Mt. Lookout Square do. People certainly aren't flocking to the big box stores along Glenway Avenue.
Well, we will se how that all equals out when the big box stores in Oakley all get built out. Pardon me, but I fail to see how the contention the lack of attractions is a major factor in the decline of living standards in the West Side. People base their choice of where to live on a lot more than whether there is a Nordstrom close by.
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Old 05-26-2013, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
Look at some of the other threads. This one will not live past June.
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Old 05-26-2013, 05:34 PM
 
7,696 posts, read 5,424,227 times
Reputation: 14415
Mikey plays Taps
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