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Old 04-07-2015, 05:16 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,949,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johddavi View Post
Don't listen to the naysayers. People in Ohio love to complain about Ohio. I lived in Cincy for 10 years just before the riots, from 89-99. Lived in Seattle in 03-04, lived in Portland from 02-03 and 04-12, and now I live in Cleveland. I'm as liberal as they come, generally speaking. I fit right in politically in Portland. I enjoyed living in Cincy much more than in Seattle, and at least as much as living in Portland. Is it less liberal, conservative politically? Yes. Is that sometimes totally annoying? Most definitely. Is public transit as good as Seattle's? No, but I didn't find Seattle's public transit all that great either when I was there (although I understand it has improved quite a bit). Like Seattle, Cincy is not a large metro area geographically, and I love driving around that city. It is a joy, IMO. The highways can be a pain, but not like Seattle's or Portland's, and the city streets are easy to get from place to place with traffic that pales in comparison to either Seattle's or Portland's. Northside is a great neighborhood I think you would enjoy, as is the Clifton Gaslight District, and now Over-the-Rhine, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in the US when I lived there, is a pretty amazing neighborhood, very close to downtown. These are all walkable neighborhoods. There are others: Hyde Park, and a couple of others whose names escape me at the minute. Plus the cost of living there is ridiculously low compared to SEA. I wouldn't hesitate to move to Cincy from Seattle. I'd be on a plane yesterday. West Coasters I know agree. I know a woman who moved there from San Fran, and another from Orange County and both love it. Hope this helps.
Thank you. Several of us are attempting to share our impressions with the OP without the perspective of having lived in all those places. As best as I can tell, there's a lot of good commentary in your post.
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Old 04-07-2015, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
Thank you. Several of us are attempting to share our impressions with the OP without the perspective of having lived in all those places. As best as I can tell, there's a lot of good commentary in your post.
I agree. I have been to Seattle many times, but it is some years now, and was always on business. You just don't get the same feeling for an area when you only go there for business. Obviously I met other people who lived there but can't claim to have gained much insight about the actual living environment. A couple of beers and dinner in a local grubbery is about the same anywhere in the country.

I have about the same perspective about Cincinnati. At one time I had a huge family on the west side of the city, among them the Schottelkottes. As the years have rolled on and many have either died or moved away, I am now hard pressed to name a single relative on the west side other than my son who lives in Mt Airy. But I will still stand by my position that College Hill was a great place in my youth but not a place I would steer someone today. Places do not change all that quickly, but do change.

MY DIL is a school teacher and has taught at Mt Healthy since she graduated from UC. She has been put in the hospital more than once by a student. They started out in a small house in Forest Park. My father was alive then, we rebuilt the kitchen, and he repainted the entire house, exterior and interior. Have to admit I have not been by there for a very long time, but am willing to gamble it has not changed much. My first house in Madeira which my wife will call a dump when I bought it, is another example. After Dad applied his magic we suddenly had a house which stood up to any on the street. Drove by it recently and they have not even changed the exterior color scheme, and that is over 40 years. Frankly I am not sure they have even repainted it.
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Old 04-07-2015, 06:45 PM
 
Location: NKY's Campbell Co.
1,818 posts, read 3,888,080 times
Reputation: 849
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johddavi View Post
Don't listen to the naysayers. People in Ohio love to complain about Ohio. I lived in Cincy for 10 years just before the riots, from 89-99. Lived in Seattle in 03-04, lived in Portland from 02-03 and 04-12, and now I live in Cleveland. I'm as liberal as they come, generally speaking. I fit right in politically in Portland. I enjoyed living in Cincy much more than in Seattle, and at least as much as living in Portland. Is it less liberal, conservative politically? Yes. Is that sometimes totally annoying? Most definitely. Is public transit as good as Seattle's? No, but I didn't find Seattle's public transit all that great either when I was there (although I understand it has improved quite a bit). Like Seattle, Cincy is not a large metro area geographically, and I love driving around that city. It is a joy, IMO. The highways can be a pain, but not like Seattle's or Portland's, and the city streets are easy to get from place to place with traffic that pales in comparison to either Seattle's or Portland's. Northside is a great neighborhood I think you would enjoy, as is the Clifton Gaslight District, and now Over-the-Rhine, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in the US when I lived there, is a pretty amazing neighborhood, very close to downtown. These are all walkable neighborhoods. There are others: Hyde Park, and a couple of others whose names escape me at the minute. Plus the cost of living there is ridiculously low compared to SEA. I wouldn't hesitate to move to Cincy from Seattle. I'd be on a plane yesterday. West Coasters I know agree. I know a woman who moved there from San Fran, and another from Orange County and both love it. Hope this helps.
Thank you! It's nice to know there are positive people on the Cincinnati forum. It seems Southwest Ohio complains a lot about what it is and is not. I never understand why, probably because I and my immediate family are not from here. The rest of the fam is scattered up and down the east coast.

Even though Ohioans complain constantly (and possibly SW Ohioans more so), the place isn't all bad. Cleveland may be a better location overall for the OP, but Cincinnati has its offerings. Culture shock? Yes, if the OP and spouse have never been outside Seattle or other west coast urban limits. But a complete write off, compared with the money the OP would save (HEY, people can pay complete cash for a house in SW Ohio when they come from the coasts! Can't do that unless you are a high-powered doctor, lawyer, business-person, entertainer out west!).

With my job, I'll have the pleasure of seeing much more of the country now. Even more than what I currently have seen (which is quite a lot compared to some SW Ohio locals!). Therefore, I can really compare the whineiness of SW Ohio with places large and small.

I'll be in Denver in less then two weeks for about 4-5 months of back and forth. It'll be interesting to compare with the three Ohio cities I am most familiar with, Dayton, Columbus and Cincinnati. I hope that I find even more a desire to say, move to the O'Bryonville area, or rent in Hyde Park.

Oh, and while biased (I know a zoo employee), the Cincinnati zoo rocks! It is certainly a nationally top 10 zoo, IMO.
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Old 04-07-2015, 07:07 PM
 
3,514 posts, read 3,780,583 times
Reputation: 1808
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrightflyer View Post
Thank you! It's nice to know there are positive people on the Cincinnati forum. It seems Southwest Ohio complains a lot about what it is and is not. I never understand why, probably because I and my immediate family are not from here. The rest of the fam is scattered up and down the east coast.

Even though Ohioans complain constantly (and possibly SW Ohioans more so), the place isn't all bad. Cleveland may be a better location overall for the OP, but Cincinnati has its offerings. Culture shock? Yes, if the OP and spouse have never been outside Seattle or other west coast urban limits. But a complete write off, compared with the money the OP would save (HEY, people can pay complete cash for a house in SW Ohio when they come from the coasts! Can't do that unless you are a high-powered doctor, lawyer, business-person, entertainer out west!).

With my job, I'll have the pleasure of seeing much more of the country now. Even more than what I currently have seen (which is quite a lot compared to some SW Ohio locals!). Therefore, I can really compare the whineiness of SW Ohio with places large and small.

I'll be in Denver in less then two weeks for about 4-5 months of back and forth. It'll be interesting to compare with the three Ohio cities I am most familiar with, Dayton, Columbus and Cincinnati. I hope that I find even more a desire to say, move to the O'Bryonville area, or rent in Hyde Park.

Oh, and while biased (I know a zoo employee), the Cincinnati zoo rocks! It is certainly a nationally top 10 zoo, IMO.
We will have to agree to disagree on the Zoo. Once they torch that Cat House they have then I'll be a little bit happier haha.

But yeah, count me in as a fourth Thank You! for the post following mine. A lot of what I wrote earlier was thinly veiled frustration with the "Golden Girls" bringing Cincy down, in my opinion at least. Or at least their effectiveness in shouting down the kind of dialogue that is happening right now.

That being said, this city does have a "conservative mystique" unmatched by any other city I can readily think of offhand. A non-idea is a good idea, and things, for the most part, don't happen. From demolishing every historic rowhouse on Glencoe Ave. to utilizing support for a bike trail for the sole purpose of blocking a rail project and nearly putting its two most treasured public buildings into a state of irreversible decay by making a levy of it, Cincinnati is a city that will happily answer NO to [fill in the blank] if it saves a buck or doesn't have extremely explicit value.

Most certainly this is not always the case. Mallory, Qualls, Seelbach, and other political leaders in Cincinnati emulate a new, fresh perspective that is open to divergent ideas and thinking, and willing to take a few risks for the benefit of the city. I can think of few better examples than Mayor Mallory agreeing to do Undercover Boss, making him the fist public figure to do the show. 3CDC has been an amazing effort to clean up one of America's most dangerous neighborhoods with its most derelict historic buildings into what is now the highly desirable OTR. New towers are being built downtown to satisfy amazing demand for housing and office space. In a lot of ways, the city has never done better.


But don't forget, this city was Tea Party before it ever became popular and will be long after its time has passed. I know a number of people from my own generation in the city who will make sure that is the case. In the meantime, I'll be enjoying the Banks, the Streetcar, the OTR, and everything else the amazing progressive movement within Cincinnati has brought, and leave the Golden Girls to bicker among themselves.
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Old 04-08-2015, 06:06 AM
 
172 posts, read 183,411 times
Reputation: 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWOH View Post
We will have to agree to disagree on the Zoo. Once they torch that Cat House they have then I'll be a little bit happier haha.

But yeah, count me in as a fourth Thank You! for the post following mine. A lot of what I wrote earlier was thinly veiled frustration with the "Golden Girls" bringing Cincy down, in my opinion at least. Or at least their effectiveness in shouting down the kind of dialogue that is happening right now.

That being said, this city does have a "conservative mystique" unmatched by any other city I can readily think of offhand. A non-idea is a good idea, and things, for the most part, don't happen. From demolishing every historic rowhouse on Glencoe Ave. to utilizing support for a bike trail for the sole purpose of blocking a rail project and nearly putting its two most treasured public buildings into a state of irreversible decay by making a levy of it, Cincinnati is a city that will happily answer NO to [fill in the blank] if it saves a buck or doesn't have extremely explicit value.

Most certainly this is not always the case. Mallory, Qualls, Seelbach, and other political leaders in Cincinnati emulate a new, fresh perspective that is open to divergent ideas and thinking, and willing to take a few risks for the benefit of the city. I can think of few better examples than Mayor Mallory agreeing to do Undercover Boss, making him the fist public figure to do the show. 3CDC has been an amazing effort to clean up one of America's most dangerous neighborhoods with its most derelict historic buildings into what is now the highly desirable OTR. New towers are being built downtown to satisfy amazing demand for housing and office space. In a lot of ways, the city has never done better.


But don't forget, this city was Tea Party before it ever became popular and will be long after its time has passed. I know a number of people from my own generation in the city who will make sure that is the case. In the meantime, I'll be enjoying the Banks, the Streetcar, the OTR, and everything else the amazing progressive movement within Cincinnati has brought, and leave the Golden Girls to bicker among themselves.
SWOH ....... I was glad to read this post...... I thought you'd gone off the deep end or something as you have always seemed pro-Cincinnati on other threads. Cincinnati/SW Ohio has always been a conservative area. The urban area now much more liberal than in the past and the "suburbs" maintaining their conservative ways. I've lived in the northern suburbs all of my life and the "tea party" types aren't any different now than they were in the '60s - 70s. Being a pretty liberal minded person it has on many occasions led me to question my sanity for not moving somewhere else. But I long ago took the attitude that this is my home as much as it is "theirs" so eff-em. My wife I and are thrilled by the progress we see in the downtown area and spend most of our free time (and money) there. For all the "problems" the Cincinnati area has, I'm very optimistic about its future.
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Old 04-08-2015, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (P Ridge)
573 posts, read 439,630 times
Reputation: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Señor Slick View Post
SWOH ....... I was glad to read this post...... I thought you'd gone off the deep end or something as you have always seemed pro-Cincinnati on other threads. Cincinnati/SW Ohio has always been a conservative area. The urban area now much more liberal than in the past and the "suburbs" maintaining their conservative ways. I've lived in the northern suburbs all of my life and the "tea party" types aren't any different now than they were in the '60s - 70s. Being a pretty liberal minded person it has on many occasions led me to question my sanity for not moving somewhere else. But I long ago took the attitude that this is my home as much as it is "theirs" so eff-em. My wife I and are thrilled by the progress we see in the downtown area and spend most of our free time (and money) there. For all the "problems" the Cincinnati area has, I'm very optimistic about its future.
Yup, this is what I was trying to say in my previous posts. The city is slowly but surely becoming more progressive and forward thinking. We're seeing it in the massive turn around in the urban core, which has led to great articles and reviews from Nat Geo Magazine to the NY Times. Cincinnati is becoming hip. We've had a minor set back with election of Cry Baby Cranley and there is always the constant negativity from the Enquirer and 700 but overall great things are happening in Cincinnati.
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Old 04-08-2015, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by cincydave8 View Post
Yup, this is what I was trying to say in my previous posts. The city is slowly but surely becoming more progressive and forward thinking. We're seeing it in the massive turn around in the urban core, which has led to great articles and reviews from Nat Geo Magazine to the NY Times. Cincinnati is becoming hip. We've had a minor set back with election of Cry Baby Cranley and there is always the constant negativity from the Enquirer and 700 but overall great things are happening in Cincinnati.
Yes great things are happening in Cincinnati, mainly driven by the great businesses located here. It is refreshing to see the downtown core receiving such attention. But as to progressive thinking, my opinion not so much. Revitalization of a downtown core and places like OTR is not progressive, it is an absolute necessity. But there is still a huge amount of work required in the inner-city neighborhoods which have been decaying for years.

I am very cautious in recommending anyone move from Seattle to Cincy, due to an absolute blinding difference in cultures. But if you have an equivalent job opportunity, just the difference in cost of living, particularly housing, you can elevate considerably and find you have money to spend on what you really enjoy. Be careful in the decision, but it is obvious that after being retired for 12 years I am in no hurry to leave Cincinnati for anywhere.
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Old 04-08-2015, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Heights, OH
36 posts, read 39,401 times
Reputation: 58
The tea party and the stifling local politics are a problem for the liberal minded, definitely, and that factor contributed to my decision to move to Cleveland and not back to Cincy. Having been here for coming up on 3 years, I'm not always sure I made the right choice. I've realized that Cincy, in many ways IS more functional civically than NE Ohio, and that matters, regardless of the tea party insanity you hear on the radio. On a day to day basis, though, I don't think the political culture was all that important to my happiness. As a Green Party lefty type, I can say I had no problem finding like-minded individuals with whom to befriend in Cincy. There were not nearly as many as in Portland or Seattle, but how many friends do you need? I had more than I could handle in Cincy and that was a great thing. Great friendships. The people I know from the West Coast had the same experience. There are social conservatives there, but I found that most of the political disagreements I had with people were economic in nature rather than values. Close-minded people are easy enough to ignore. Just don't listen to 700 am. If I were moving from the West Coast to Cincy, I a) wouldn't hesitate; and b) would focus my housing search on Clifton, Northside and OTR to find like-minded people.

What Cincy has going for it IMO is the large presence of college students. People from outside Cincy don't realize how large the student population of UC really is. It is probably similar to UW in size, if not a little larger. That young energy is one of Cincy's best assets, IMO. It is something I think Cleveland lacks which really sucks for CLE. That population is one of the reasons I don't think the culture shock would be too bad coming from Seattle. Everything else would be ok for the most part. The food scene in Cincy is every bit as good as in Seattle from what I can recall, and more reasonably priced, the exceptions being seafood and sushi. I don't recall sushi being all that available in Cincy, but that was 15 years ago. The weather isn't too bad in Cincy, although it can't compare with Seattle summers which are the best.

The OP's significant other, I guess, could suffer some culture shock as the Asian population in Cincy is small, as I recall. Seattle's on the other hand, is huge in comparison. That, I suppose would be my biggest concern.
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Old 04-08-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
60 posts, read 63,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZereKeita View Post
Hello,

I have a job opportunity in the Cincinnati area and I have a few questions because I'm sold on the job but not quite sure how I feel about moving there.

1. My wife and I are a mixed couple, I'm African American and my wife is Asian American. Seattle is considered one of the most inclusive cities with the highest number of interracial couples in the country. Our concern is that we've read about Cincinnati's past racial tensions and we're wondering if the city is progressive enough for us. We would like to hear everyone's thoughts and opinions around this.

2. We currently live in one of the hottest neighborhoods in Seattle with a lot of amenities. We're in walking distance to multiple grocery stores, amazing restaurants, and a weekend farmers market. Plus we're just a quick 5 minute bus ride to the stadiums. Can anyone recommend any comparable neighborhoods that would appeal to our current life style if we were to move?

3. Finally does Cincinnati have a Chinatown? Or at least an Asian market?

Best!
I just moved back to Seattle last year and honestly missed being home more than I thought. Let me offer my two cents although just be wary of my bias because I won't speak for every Seattleite that's moved.

1. Cincinnati's racism is real. It comes from the upper class country club whites, the rednecks (both of the middle class and working class), and the blacks who will probably rail you for marrying an Asian. A Korean friend of mine told me she's gotten racism mainly from the blacks there, but some of the whites have also called her multiple slurs. It's definitely not progressive at all either. Almost everyone here in the general population was socially conservative and outside a few open-minded people, you won't be finding many of those types you're looking for. They're pretty much the insular types when it comes to race and stick to their own kind. Moving back to Seattle and seeing every race together again was kind of refreshing, lol

2. I think Northside might be your cup of tea if you're looking for something like Seattle. It was one of the few areas in town that I actually felt comfortable in. Has plenty of unique shops and restaurants that are as diverse as it gets and it's clearly a shame, at least to me, that this was all I could find in terms of finding a niche area. It's definitely a bit more dangerous than your average Seattle neighborhood though. So be wary.

3. Cincinnati's Asian market is almost nonexistent. The food options here are very much the same. There are some Chinese restaurants here and there, but the food here is largely American and to me always seemed to have more of that Cincinnati Chili (or food in that league) as opposed to having a variety. Clifton is relatively similar as well. OTR I'd avoid as it still has a lot of problems here and there, especially from its checkered past.

Advice would be to come to Cincy with thick skin and know exactly what you want to do to keep yourself and your wife satisfied. There are not too many open-minded people and areas here as there would be in Seattle. It took me at least 3 years for me to finally get used to the area and learn that I could just simply be my own self and not worry about having a presence there and embrace my anonymity. I was relatively young when I moved from Lexington, Kentucky (freshman year of undergrad there, hated it, hated it, hated it), went to a Catholic school in Cincinnati to finish my undergrad education. Worked a job on the side for 3 years, spent an additional year there before finally deciding to move back to Seattle for grad school and hopefully beyond. If you come in with the right mind to block out mass ignorance, you'll be fine. Focus on your job and your loved ones, make the right friends, and steer clear of the large amounts of ignorance there. Just be wary you'll be alone in a lot of things here. If you can tolerate that, I'm sure you'll be OK.

These are just my experiences, I don't want it to give people the wrong impression, but it's just what I got out of it.

Last edited by risingcalm; 04-08-2015 at 04:04 PM..
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Old 04-08-2015, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,377 posts, read 3,693,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by risingcalm View Post
I just moved back to Seattle last year and honestly missed being home more than I thought. Let me offer my two cents although just be wary of my bias because I won't speak for every Seattleite that's moved...

...Advice would be to come to Cincy with thick skin and know exactly what you want to do to keep yourself and your wife satisfied. There are not too many open-minded people and areas here as there would be in Seattle. It took me at least 3 years for me to finally get used to the area and learn that I could just simply be my own self and not worry about having a presence there and embrace my anonymity. I was relatively young when I moved from Lexington, Kentucky (freshman year of undergrad there, hated it, hated it, hated it), went to a Catholic school in Cincinnati to finish my undergrad education. Worked a job on the side for 3 years, spent an additional year there before finally deciding to move back to Seattle for grad school and hopefully beyond. If you come in with the right mind to block out mass ignorance, you'll be fine. Focus on your job and your loved ones, make the right friends, and steer clear of the large amounts of ignorance there. Just be wary you'll be alone in a lot of things here. If you can tolerate that, I'm sure you'll be OK.

These are just my experiences, I don't want it to give people the wrong impression, but it's just what I got out of it.
Now that you've returned to Seattle and taken a pound of Cincinnati flesh with you, there's naturally going to be repercussions (and why not; basically, you just trashed the city). But, then again, maybe nothing much needs to be said in rebuttal--after all, the OP hasn't responded to anything since his first post (a very bad sign indeed).
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