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Old 04-27-2015, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,369,950 times
Reputation: 1920

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Nope, Nope ,Nope, please tell me why this is necessary? Just see no reason for why it is! Of course we see very little about necessary infrastrastructure. Cuure, guess, guess why, because we are too plain stupid.
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Old 04-28-2015, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (P Ridge)
573 posts, read 440,714 times
Reputation: 460
It's not necessary, its more of a debate on how ugly the building is. At least that's how I see it.
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Old 04-28-2015, 06:15 AM
 
5,653 posts, read 8,758,092 times
Reputation: 2357
If Kroger owns the building then ultimately it is up to their corporate Hierarchy and any shareholders to decide if changes to the headquarters need to be made.
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Old 04-28-2015, 06:28 AM
 
5,653 posts, read 8,758,092 times
Reputation: 2357
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWOH View Post
*more cowbell*



I don't know. Downtown Cincinnati doesn't have an overwhelming office space demand, at least not that I've seen. Residential, sure, but '60's and '70's era office towers aren't exactly considered great for residential conversions. Plus that would be an overwhelming number of units.

It's really in everyone's best interest if Kroger and Macy's stay exactly the way they are when it comes to their HQ's. Unless Cranley wants to give up that Hopple Street Tax Wasting Viaduct....
The old Hartford National Bank Building which is a 26 story building is being converted over to apartments and/or condo's. Built in 1967 if I recall. Surely some buildings from that era can easily convert to usable living spaces. But this is a side note.

Agree completely that it is up to Kroger to decide what it should do with its building, not the general public.
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Old 04-28-2015, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,383 posts, read 3,699,603 times
Reputation: 1746
Sadly to say, Cincinnati's three most prestigious companies are all underrepresented by their headquarter buildings. Even though these companies are clustered only blocks apart (Kroger, the nation's largest supermarket chain; Procter & Gamble, the world's largest consumer-products company; and Macy's, the nation's largest department-store chain) their combined presence on the city skyline is negligible.

The "P&G Plaza" (completed around 1985) does serve as a sort of anchor for the SE corner of the CBD, but that's it. The twin-towers are massive enough, but in the wrong way. Both are stubby and compact and even together they don't point skyward enough to symbolize the power of P&G.

Macy's headquarters is even less impressive. Sure, the well-known name looks good atop the structure, but that's only what it is--a name; after all, it was Federated Department Stores that acquired Macy's, not the other way around. Some pundits continue to dismiss Macy's Cincinnati location as nothing more some "backroom operation" for NYC, but they're probably the same people who continually refer to Cincinnati as some "backwater town." The truth is that Macy's, Kroger and P&G are all in Cincinnati for the long term, enabling the city to be a combined marketing/retail hub and a Midwestern cultural center. Maybe, then nothing's needed of Macy's, other than to adapt to the "Age of Amazon"--no easy task, no matter where a headquarters is located.

Kroger's nondescript headquarters does beg for both bigness and boldness, but (as pointed out by other posters), such a transformation isn't easily done--at least not w/o spending millions of $$--and Kroger's too frugal for that. Rather than erect some grandiose downtown skyscraper, Kroger will probably incorporate its financial resources in mano-a-mano combat with Wal-Mart, acquisition of competitors, and national expansion (especially in the NE). And, like both Macy's and P&G, it's evolving to enter the "Age of Amazon." As such, a centralized eye-popping skyscraper may not be the answer--and, for downtown Cincinnati, that's too bad. (Meanwhile, Western & Southern is hinting that it's soon to build a new headquarters of its own near a reconstructed Lytle Tunnel and revamped Anna Louise Inn.)
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Old 04-28-2015, 01:27 PM
 
1,556 posts, read 1,463,687 times
Reputation: 1626
I'm fiscally conservative, but I believe an argument could be made that the Kroger HQ building is ugly enough that it could effect recruiting. The ugliness of the building could have an effect on the company's ability to attract top talent outside of Kroger. Recruiting a top Safeway/Albertson's merchandiser from Pleasonton, CA who's accustomed to pleasant working facilities, might be less inclined to accept a KR job offer if they think KR's HQ is hideous.

Additionally, Kroger has employees sprawled all over the city---at a minimum in separate facilities in Blue Ash and Montgomery. It probably makes sense to consolidate these people into one building.

Framing arguments in dollars and cents works with corp types....don't try to appeal to the sense of "architectural importance." Corporate people have P&L's they're accountable to.....that's what moves them.
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Old 04-28-2015, 09:30 PM
 
13,714 posts, read 22,848,304 times
Reputation: 18526
Quote:
Originally Posted by flashes1 View Post
I'm fiscally conservative, but I believe an argument could be made that the Kroger HQ building is ugly enough that it could effect recruiting. The ugliness of the building could have an effect on the company's ability to attract top talent outside of Kroger. Recruiting a top Safeway/Albertson's merchandiser from Pleasonton, CA who's accustomed to pleasant working facilities, might be less inclined to accept a KR job offer if they think KR's HQ is hideous..

Considering the performance of Safeway/Albertson's in recent years, you might not want to attract all that "talent". Safeway/Albertson's is known through the industry as one that is not "female friendly" which is interesting considering its target market is women ...
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Old 04-29-2015, 05:39 AM
 
1,556 posts, read 1,463,687 times
Reputation: 1626
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Considering the performance of Safeway/Albertson's in recent years, you might not want to attract all that "talent". Safeway/Albertson's is known through the industry as one that is not "female friendly" which is interesting considering its target market is women ...
If it makes you feel better substitute the name "XYZ Corp." for Safeway/ABS. Jeez
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Old 04-29-2015, 05:44 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 10,213,886 times
Reputation: 6560
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
Sadly to say, Cincinnati's three most prestigious companies are all underrepresented by their headquarter buildings. Even though these companies are clustered only blocks apart (Kroger, the nation's largest supermarket chain; Procter & Gamble, the world's largest consumer-products company; and Macy's, the nation's largest department-store chain) their combined presence on the city skyline is negligible.

The "P&G Plaza" (completed around 1985) does serve as a sort of anchor for the SE corner of the CBD, but that's it. The twin-towers are massive enough, but in the wrong way. Both are stubby and compact and even together they don't point skyward enough to symbolize the power of P&G.

Macy's headquarters is even less impressive. Sure, the well-known name looks good atop the structure, but that's only what it is--a name; after all, it was Federated Department Stores that acquired Macy's, not the other way around. Some pundits continue to dismiss Macy's Cincinnati location as nothing more some "backroom operation" for NYC, but they're probably the same people who continually refer to Cincinnati as some "backwater town." The truth is that Macy's, Kroger and P&G are all in Cincinnati for the long term, enabling the city to be a combined marketing/retail hub and a Midwestern cultural center. Maybe, then nothing's needed of Macy's, other than to adapt to the "Age of Amazon"--no easy task, no matter where a headquarters is located.

Kroger's nondescript headquarters does beg for both bigness and boldness, but (as pointed out by other posters), such a transformation isn't easily done--at least not w/o spending millions of $$--and Kroger's too frugal for that. Rather than erect some grandiose downtown skyscraper, Kroger will probably incorporate its financial resources in mano-a-mano combat with Wal-Mart, acquisition of competitors, and national expansion (especially in the NE). And, like both Macy's and P&G, it's evolving to enter the "Age of Amazon." As such, a centralized eye-popping skyscraper may not be the answer--and, for downtown Cincinnati, that's too bad. (Meanwhile, Western & Southern is hinting that it's soon to build a new headquarters of its own near a reconstructed Lytle Tunnel and revamped Anna Louise Inn.)
Having worked in Pharma (which P&G used to be, before they exited and went strictly consumer health products) for basically my life, I have to say the P&G headquarters are one of the most impressive corporate headquarters I've ever seen as far as its presence. Keep in mind, most are on research campuses far outside of "big" cities.

If you're looking for Cinci to compete on world skylines, that's fine, but a silly reason for businesses to spend millions of dollars on their buildings, just to satisfy the aesthetic whims of an ever changing populace.

It ain't NYC (where price per square foot has driven the unrelenting race for the sun) nor even Chicago.

When rents are going for over 1000 sq/ft and the city is landlocked with no additional vacant buildings or lots to tear down and build over, then you will start to see the 100+ story buildings overshadowing all their neighbors. Also, a lot of that open space that makes Cincy a manageable and human-scale city will also disappear.

So I'd be careful on that front what you wish for.
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Old 04-29-2015, 05:47 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 10,213,886 times
Reputation: 6560
Quote:
Originally Posted by flashes1 View Post
I'm fiscally conservative, but I believe an argument could be made that the Kroger HQ building is ugly enough that it could effect recruiting. The ugliness of the building could have an effect on the company's ability to attract top talent outside of Kroger. Recruiting a top Safeway/Albertson's merchandiser from Pleasonton, CA who's accustomed to pleasant working facilities, might be less inclined to accept a KR job offer if they think KR's HQ is hideous.

Additionally, Kroger has employees sprawled all over the city---at a minimum in separate facilities in Blue Ash and Montgomery. It probably makes sense to consolidate these people into one building.

Framing arguments in dollars and cents works with corp types....don't try to appeal to the sense of "architectural importance." Corporate people have P&L's they're accountable to.....that's what moves them.
Most employees look at Pay package, relo benefits, benefits in general (vacation, stock options, health care packages, etc..) and cost of living of the surrounding area (if they're relocating), before they look at whether or not the 1970's building is going to bring them down.

Which isn't to say it might not be a fleeting thought, but its not normally at the top of what candidates are concerned about (the right stock options and benefits can do a lot to mitigate "the building is ugly" in the eyes of new hires)
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