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Old 02-01-2016, 07:43 PM
 
196 posts, read 179,613 times
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Cincinnati has been getting some national recognition. Saw something the other day where Emilio Estevez is singing the praises of Cincinnati, and specifically Over-the-Rhine. The All-Star Game helped. The Bengals-Steelers playoff game, not so much.

 
Old 02-03-2016, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Kennedy Heights, Ohio. USA
1,633 posts, read 1,285,888 times
Reputation: 1295
For Cincinnati to get national recognition is has to start at the top. You have to have forward thinking civic leaders with the ability to mode consensus, able to see which characteristic trends are making cities highly sought after and be able to adjust civic policies accordingly. Instead we have the opposite: reactionary opportunistic careerists in the likes of Mayor Cranley and Gov John Kasich, proudly regressive, catering to unhealthy biases of a highly motivated electorate, ignorant and highly hostile to implementing civic policies that makes 1st rate urban regions possible. These guys like to tout themselves as innovative forward thinkers but in actual reality they are all about maintaining the status quo and their power base by all means necessary. If Ohio urban areas instituted proven successful urban policies migrating national population growth to Ohio city's urban areas would be bad politically for ideological conservative politicians like Gov Kasich and their power base because most of the out of state migrants would most likely be young and ideologically progressive. He and his ilk has not only an ideological bias but an in-group/out-group bias against implementing civic policies benefiting urban areas but also blacks - a disliked out-group. As it had been said "a nation divided cannot stand" can also be said about a region or state regarding the potential it can achieve. What makes urban regions successful and highly sought after places to live in: urbanity - the ability to live an urban experience in an urban area. Our civic leaders are stuck in the past thinking that interjecting suburbanity - expansion of highways, big box strip mall development - in urban regions is the right path forward for growth and success. That is why despite all the advantages Cincinnati has in architecture and housing stock and improving on that such as expanding mass transit infrastructure, it is held back in the potential it could achieve in overall urbanity by civic leaders of this region. You need forward thinking leadership in Ohio and its cities to experience the same levels of growth in the future like other highly sought after cities in other regions are now experiencing avoiding stagnation.
 
Old 02-03-2016, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,232 posts, read 57,405,335 times
Reputation: 52099
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Pittsburgh is a city in the Northeast since it is in PA, not the Midwest. Conneaut, OH is only about 40 minutes from the NY border! One could even argue the real Midwest does not begin until you hit Indiana as OH seems to be a transition state due to its proximity to the East, Midwest and South.
Not exactly sure what Conneaut has to do with anything ...

Why even argue where the Midwest begins and ends? Are you embarrassed to be living in a Midwestern city?
 
Old 02-03-2016, 06:57 PM
 
1,337 posts, read 1,159,145 times
Reputation: 1169
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTheWayToMemphis View Post
When I have free time, I often google street view places that I've never been, and Cincinnati looks like one of the coolest cities that I've never visited. Lots of dive bars, great housing stock, decent downtown/skyline, plenty of restaurants...how come you never really hear about it among cities its size around here and in the national spotlight?
A lot of cities look great, but that doesn't mean they are great places to be. Just take a look at all the cities in PA with great built environments.

As to why you never hear much about it I'd say:

The people mainly.
Conservatives.
Reputation (deserved or not).
Other Ohio & nearby cities outshining it.

I'm sure there are other things as well.
 
Old 02-04-2016, 03:02 AM
 
5,658 posts, read 8,767,561 times
Reputation: 2365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Not exactly sure what Conneaut has to do with anything ...

Why even argue where the Midwest begins and ends? Are you embarrassed to be living in a Midwestern city?
Only embarrassed to live in some of them. And I agree there is no point in arguing about where the Midwest starts or ends. I'm merely trying to straighten out a point that is factually incorrect in Briola's post.

To call Pittsburgh a Midwest city is absurd. It's located in PA and that is an eastern State. Utilizing that logic one might was well call Burlington, VT a part of Quebec since many signs in northern New England are in French in addition to English and also a good percentage of the population traces its roots to French Canada. The same can be said for Hartford. Lots of people trace their roots back to Quebec.

Cincinnati is a Midwest city despite the fact that many area residents trace their roots to the South. Perhaps if enough people from KY and TN move into Cincinnati it will be then be considered a southern city?

Hope this clears up my point.
 
Old 02-04-2016, 02:46 PM
 
196 posts, read 179,613 times
Reputation: 123
The whole Midwest - South - NE thing is beside the point...


I pretty much agree with everything Coseau said above. People here, both the powers-that-be and your average Cincinnati area native, are highly resistant to change. They may give lip service to attracting outsiders to the region but don't always seem quite sure how to absorb people who aren't from here. Heck, I grew up within a 45 min. drive of downtown and as far as your average Cincy native is concerned, I might as well be from Mars. The region tends to be kind of introverted and surprisingly not very good at self-promotion (surprising because our flagship corporation, P&G, lives and dies by marketing).
 
Old 02-05-2016, 12:18 PM
 
95 posts, read 59,987 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Only embarrassed to live in some of them. And I agree there is no point in arguing about where the Midwest starts or ends. I'm merely trying to straighten out a point that is factually incorrect in Briola's post.

To call Pittsburgh a Midwest city is absurd. It's located in PA and that is an eastern State. Utilizing that logic one might was well call Burlington, VT a part of Quebec since many signs in northern New England are in French in addition to English and also a good percentage of the population traces its roots to French Canada. The same can be said for Hartford. Lots of people trace their roots back to Quebec.

Cincinnati is a Midwest city despite the fact that many area residents trace their roots to the South. Perhaps if enough people from KY and TN move into Cincinnati it will be then be considered a southern city?

Hope this clears up my point.
regionality doesn't make sense if you're going to base it on specific geography. identities are perhaps cultivated by the land. regionalism is an attempt to approximate this great nation. you can be pedantic about it, which i'm inclined to do or you can subscribe to someone else's approved model. the example of pittsbugh and cincinnati is a great one. both are pretty identical. ohio river towns, similar size, blue collar, gentrification kicking in, rust belt, hilly, isolated from the rest of the state, borders (more or less) two other states, we've had sex with each other's wives, etc....

anyways, i used to be pretty involved with the local couchsurfing scene. i met some amazing people and they were mostly transplants. we became such good friends and we still kick it today, in the city. i'd wager there's 20 of us, probably more and only a few of us are from the city. some have bought houses and gotten married and have wee ones. others that have moved have made plans to come back. there's nothing significant about the region, unless if you're a romantic like me who can love just about anywhere, there's no grand canyons or snow capped mountain ranges, but there's a pull, perhaps the 275 loop, that some folk just can't escape.

i don't want this city to become too big for its britches. my friends and i used to talk about how if the subway were completed way back when, we'd be a chicago. i like chicago, it's great. but i don't wanna live there. we're a good sized city and we have an ikea and now a cabela's. you talk ***** about our chili, well that's fine too. i happen to love it
 
Old 02-06-2016, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
671 posts, read 417,973 times
Reputation: 742
Quote:
Originally Posted by kruschev View Post
you talk ***** about our chili, well that's fine too. i happen to love it
I love it too, but in a gross way. Kind of the same way I feel about Little Caesars pizza.
 
Old 02-06-2016, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna.
11,409 posts, read 6,817,046 times
Reputation: 14473
Cincinnati loses some of its prominence due the fact that historic, geographic and economic influences are all (slightly) stacked against it. It benefitted in its earliest days from its location on the nation's major river system; western expansion followed the Ohio River, then spread outward/inland, so the Queen City was well-established long before Indianapolis or Chicago.

But with the passage of time, technology eventually evolved in a manner which favored other cities, and I think the coming of the railroads, which didn't have to follow the course of a river, and could also move large volumes of freight (so long as the terrain was relatively flat) were the most prominent example. Columbus and Dayton's growth expanded, while Cincinnati's slowed.

Not really that much of an issue, since by that time, many social and cultural activities had "anchored" themselves; the city is hardly drying up.
 
Old 02-07-2016, 12:08 PM
 
95 posts, read 59,987 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coseau View Post
For Cincinnati to get national recognition is has to start at the top. You have to have forward thinking civic leaders with the ability to mode consensus, able to see which characteristic trends are making cities highly sought after and be able to adjust civic policies accordingly. Instead we have the opposite: reactionary opportunistic careerists in the likes of Mayor Cranley and Gov John Kasich, proudly regressive, catering to unhealthy biases of a highly motivated electorate, ignorant and highly hostile to implementing civic policies that makes 1st rate urban regions possible. These guys like to tout themselves as innovative forward thinkers but in actual reality they are all about maintaining the status quo and their power base by all means necessary. If Ohio urban areas instituted proven successful urban policies migrating national population growth to Ohio city's urban areas would be bad politically for ideological conservative politicians like Gov Kasich and their power base because most of the out of state migrants would most likely be young and ideologically progressive. He and his ilk has not only an ideological bias but an in-group/out-group bias against implementing civic policies benefiting urban areas but also blacks - a disliked out-group. As it had been said "a nation divided cannot stand" can also be said about a region or state regarding the potential it can achieve. What makes urban regions successful and highly sought after places to live in: urbanity - the ability to live an urban experience in an urban area. Our civic leaders are stuck in the past thinking that interjecting suburbanity - expansion of highways, big box strip mall development - in urban regions is the right path forward for growth and success. That is why despite all the advantages Cincinnati has in architecture and housing stock and improving on that such as expanding mass transit infrastructure, it is held back in the potential it could achieve in overall urbanity by civic leaders of this region. You need forward thinking leadership in Ohio and its cities to experience the same levels of growth in the future like other highly sought after cities in other regions are now experiencing avoiding stagnation.
it's very easy to blame a few people. why don't you blame the majority of people who elected those folks?
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