U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-11-2008, 01:35 PM
 
34 posts, read 149,699 times
Reputation: 25
Hi all-

There is a very good likelihood that I will be relocating to Cinci relatively soon for a job at P&G. What is life like at P&G? Are they a secure employer? I'm a single, 28 year old, male wondering what life would be like to live in cinci and work for P&G. It would be a great opportunity for me, so I hope I get it.

I'm "all ears" if you have anything positive or negative to say about P&G, or cinci in general.

Thanks
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-11-2008, 01:41 PM
 
710 posts, read 2,648,357 times
Reputation: 149
the strongest cincinnati supporters I have ever met are either from the city who returned after a few years away or P&G transplants.

My best advice is to live downtown, in mt. adams, or Over the Rhine

the single transplants I know all live in that area
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2008, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
2,868 posts, read 8,443,210 times
Reputation: 1500
My SIL is currently working for P&G. She has done nothing but climb the corperate ladder and has made a bunch of money in doing so. She loves her job and all the perks. And boy they have a ton of perks. They are a very secure employer. My SIL participates in all kind of sample promos. She gets to try new products before they are marketed and gives her opinion..and makes a ton of side cash doing so... They have a gym and a store that "proctoids" (that is what we call my SIL ) can buy stuff at discounts...

She loves her job...

About 5 years ago she got a 5 piece luggage set for a Christmas gift...A really nice set...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2008, 08:25 PM
 
3,750 posts, read 10,201,548 times
Reputation: 6560
P&G is still one of the more secure employers. If the job is something intersting in your career path, definitely go for it. I'm fairly new to the Cincy area myself (living in the burbs, working in the burbs) having relocated last year from SE Michigan. So far, I like it very much. Good luck to you!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2008, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
Reputation: 6449
My dad was a careerlong P & G'er, loved it there, and only took early retirement because - being the engineer he was trained to be - he did the math and figured out that he stood to profit by accepting the "golden parachute." There's a lesson in that. A genuinely "secure employer" doesn't try to show long-term associates the door before their time, however lucratively. And P & G is on the bandwagon of doing what all too many large American companies are up to now. Service and technical occupations are outsourced, often to other countries. Contractors are brought in from temp agencies to tackle projects. If profits don't outpace those of the previous year, heads roll so that the big kahunas can keep their outrageous bonus payments. Dad said that by the time the '90s were upon us, "It wasn't a fun place to work any more." Watching and waiting for quarterly reports so that you know whether you'll get paid in a month's time can do that to people. He told of a colleague's once reporting to a higher-up that he (the colleague) would soon need to resign, having been diagnosed with inoperable brain cancer. The man was told, "Clean out your desk and be gone within the hour. HR will call you."

The product trial I remember most fondly was when P & G was looking to market a new potato chip that would be sold in, of all things, a CAN. At the time you could only buy canned potato chips if you purchased a huge quantity. There'd never been chips in a can at our house. It goes without saying that once America started poppin', there was no stoppin' (LOL!) I'm glad to hear that at-home try-outs still go on. Ditto for all the free products for employees. Much missed are the annual Dividend Days (free admission to Coney, later Kings, Island for all P & G'ers and their families, for whom the park was reserved on a summer Saturday) and the overloaded picnic hampers that were given out at Christmas.

MSLR, having said that I still can say that your call was spot-on. Few are chosen to sign on with Uncle Procter. That speaks volumes for what you must've achieved academically, for starters. The negatives I outlined above are how the working world is no matter where you look. People are stunned when I talk of my father's having remained at the same company from straight out of college into his sixties. Hardly anyone drawing a paycheck today is going to be able to say that when they retire. I personally won't be, and neither will my sibs. So take the realities with a grain of salt, because it's the same all over. You've indeed been tendered an excellent opportunity.

One of Mark Twain's many quotations, which he may or may not have actually coined, was that he wanted to die in Cincinnati because it's twenty years behind every place else so it'd take him that much longer to kick off. In the first decade of the 21st Century, that sums up the local culture aptly still. Politically speaking, if you tend towards being on the "right" side of issues you'll find plentiful company. Since you haven't announced otherwise, I'm going to assume that you're a Caucasian, Christian, heterosexual guy. People who fall outside of one or more of those categories bear the brunt of Cincy's social backasswardness, and I along with others in this forum will offer the appropriate cautionary words to those who can use them. As you apparently don't, I'll just second the reco's for in-town neighborhoods that others have. There are also large apartment/condo complexes in suburban areas in pretty much every direction from the city. Night life is the most "happening" in Newport, Mt Adams, and downtown. Read Cincinnati Magazine's online edition to get a better feel for that. For a city of its size, Cincinnati has an impressive collection of museums and a lot of artistic and musical offerings, so if you're inclined to "feed your head" in that way you'll do fine too.

Bottom line: Go for it. If a door closes at P & G, a dozen more will swing open when word gets out to headhunters that you put in time there. Best o' luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2008, 08:49 AM
 
34 posts, read 149,699 times
Reputation: 25
thanks to everyone for all the excellent info. i certainly like the sound of "at home product try-outs" and P&G days at King's Island. I'm a huge rollercoaster addict. the job would be a great opportunity for me, so i would certainly accept it and move to cincy if I got the position. i am also in SE michigan, Briolat21, so it sounds like we have a few things in common.

i'm assuming a company the size of p&g has various organization and group events to help employees become acquainted with each other and meet new people - ?

that's troubling that cincy is still so "backwards" in terms of accepting others. fortunately, i do fit goyguy's description, so I won't be feeling the brunt of discrimination. still troubling though, but i do have a tendency to find open minded people wherever I go. guess we'll see...

from your posts and others that i have viewed it appears that mt.adams or downtown are the best areas for me. what about newport/clifton area? is that a young, singles area? is mt. adams really expensive?

thanks again, for all the advice and encouragement. i really appreciate it. and think good thoughts for me

warm regards,
mslr
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2008, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,834,490 times
Reputation: 619
I am not sure about P&G, lol I live in Cleveland. The times I have visited Cincinnati, all I could do was stare at their headquarters though. LOL it is a great looking office complex. Downtown Cincinnati is experiencing rapid growth in downtown living. Look into living downtown.

Great looking complex:
http://www.achievemax.com/blogimages/procter-gamble.jpg

http://www.daap.uc.edu/library/archcinci/images/procterandgamble.jpg (broken link)

http://a.abcnews.com/images/Business/97cd86e8-ed0b-462c-8286-b80cb5bec8d9_ms.jpeg (broken link)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2008, 03:21 PM
 
710 posts, read 2,648,357 times
Reputation: 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by mslr View Post
thanks to everyone for all the excellent info. i certainly like the sound of "at home product try-outs" and P&G days at King's Island. I'm a huge rollercoaster addict. the job would be a great opportunity for me, so i would certainly accept it and move to cincy if I got the position. i am also in SE michigan, Briolat21, so it sounds like we have a few things in common.

i'm assuming a company the size of p&g has various organization and group events to help employees become acquainted with each other and meet new people - ?

that's troubling that cincy is still so "backwards" in terms of accepting others. fortunately, i do fit goyguy's description, so I won't be feeling the brunt of discrimination. still troubling though, but i do have a tendency to find open minded people wherever I go. guess we'll see...

from your posts and others that i have viewed it appears that mt.adams or downtown are the best areas for me. what about newport/clifton area? is that a young, singles area? is mt. adams really expensive?

thanks again, for all the advice and encouragement. i really appreciate it. and think good thoughts for me

warm regards,
mslr
the city isn't backwards, the suburbs contain most of the conservative people. the city, especially the urban core, is rather progressive and accepting for the most part.

mt adams would be cheap for most other cities, but is a little pricier for cincinnati.

your single best bet is downtown
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2008, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
Reputation: 6449
Roller Coaster Nirvana is only about 4-5 hours away - Cedar Point, you know it!

If you go to the Cincinnati Magazine Web site (or pick up a copy next time you're in town), you'll find a lot of space given over to "home and garden" types of articles. Skip over all the ads for the new McMansion and "Dreesville" developments going up all over suburbia and focus in on those for downtown and the Kentucky riverfront. Many of the former office buildings and even department stores which were intended to be loft condos are now also offering rentals to reflect the downturn in the housing market. There are also apartments and "townhomes" galore in the Betts-Longworth redevelopment area as well as in a large complex called City West. This sector is immediately northwest of downtown (and due west of Over-the-Rhine, more on that in a sec.) Reviews are mixed on these new neighborhoods. As did a lot of northern US cities, Cincinnati put up vast ugly collections of public housing projects and concentrated them in certain parts of town. City West is the "mixed income" successor to some of that, and Betts-Longworth - abutting it - is an effort to reclaim some of the classic 1800's row houses and mix them in with new imitations. Some people swear by those attempts at new communities, others at them. Displacement of project residents is burdening nearby sections of the city, many of them already struggling with poverty and crime issues, and those issues haven't left the City West/Betts-Longworth precincts by any stretch of the imagination.

Over-the-Rhine elicits a similar reaction as far as either swearing by or at. Considered "ripe for renewal" for some fifty years or more, with its bordering blocks "turning around" and million$ being invested it may well come to pass in the near future. The city is talking about constructing an old-fashioned streetcar (not diesel-powered "trolley") line from the riverfront area to the northern end of OTR. The Cincinnati Art Academy has relocated from the grounds of the Art Museum to a newly converted warehouse. The nationally renowned School for the Creative and Performing Arts will also be be moving in to new digs thereabouts. Condos and trendy stores are making tentative inroads north of Central Parkway, the historic dividing line from downtown. And Music Hall hasn't budged since about 1870, ditto for the open-air Findlay Market. The eastern part, straddling Main and Sycamore Sts, has seen some success (and failure) as a nightlife area. A lot of the century-old rowhouses are being rehabbed by artists, high-tech entrepeneurs, and "urban pioneers," even as others remain left to rot or to exist as subsidized housing. Here again, though, any real upswing in safety and stability is still in the future.

As the host to UC, Clifton is and always will be a student haven. College days tend to be fondly remembered, but speaking for myself I don't need nightly reminders in the form of screaming adolescents - or bars where the most prominent signs are reminders of the legal drinking age. Once you've crossed Ludlow Ave heading north, though, or gotten 2-3 blocks west of Clifton Ave, the apartment buildings are inhabited mainly by full-fledged adults. UC's eastern neighbor, Corryville, has some nightspots along "Short Vine" and lots of affordable rentals but can't seem to counteract a decade-long increase in street crime. For me it's still a shock to see sidewalks once thronged with collegians out for a good time now largely deserted after dark, but there it is. On the southern outskirts of Corryville, a large new condo/apartment complex called Stetson Village has been open for a couple of years and appears to be developing into a "good address."

A lot's said about the uberhip Newport and Covington riverfronts, but beyond the pricy high-rise condos the in-town areas retain a sketchiness about them. You can walk past a row of popular restaurants and rehabbed office/residential buildings only to reach a corner ringed by pawn shops and convenience stores. Still, the walk would be at an easier pace than would be true in Corryville or City West or OTR.

Wherever there are hilly narrow streets, expensive townhouses and apartments with phenomenal views, hip jazz clubs, and "happening" bars and restaurants, the comparison with San Francisco is made. Mt Adams is no exception. It perches, if not teeters, on a steep slope seemingly directly above the river. I could easily picture MSLR hanging his hat and distributing his disposable income there. Cincinnati's vagabonds and vagrants are mostly in and around OTR, the hippie wannabe's gravitate to Clifton, the gay men are situated elsewhere in town (but with some presence in that "tolerant" community), and there's not anything resembling a cable car to be found since the hill-climbing "incline" cars were abandoned. Fog doesn't happen much, either. But you could still buy some Rice-a-Roni for supper, then hit the Blind Lemon, and get some of that San Fran feel.

The East End lies to the, yes, east of downtown along the river. (Re)developers are starting in on that historically poor White neighborhood, putting up new buildings and small complexes and doing house makeovers. Eastern Ave has been rechristened "Riverside Drive." I can't help but project my anti-gentrification mindset on this section of town, though. By 2010 or so, there'll probably be some "New American cuisine" eateries, and at least one watering hole with an Irish name and German-American owners (lol.) But for now it's at the stage of long-term residents' evictions and mutual resentment between old-timers and newcomers. That's not my cuppa Sobe.

Mt Lookout, O'Bryonville, Hyde Park, and East Walnut Hills are a bit farther from downtown but still within easy driving distance. (Cincinnati does have a bus system, but the frequency of service isn't great and much of the city isn't covered.) All of those neighborhoods have their own local shopping districts and some spots for unwinding after work. The first and third locales named are "99 44/100%" Caucasian in composition, with more diversity to be found in the other two. Not every "deeluxe apartment in the sky" in Cincy is along the river or in Mt Adams. You can also rent a sweeping view in some East Walnut Hills buildings. Two more "good addresses" as far as high-rises go are the Madison House and particularly the Regency, astride Madison Rd near the confluence of Hyde Park and O'Bryonville.

P & G does have the standard-issue softball, bowling, etc leagues found in every large company, as well as other networking opportunities. Since my father was already engaged when he signed on there, and that was eons ago, I don't know of any formally organized social groups or meet-and-greets. But they're bound to exist. Getting to know co-workers, and meeting available women on and off the job, should be relatively easy regardless. Procter's likely still is a "Greek house" in its own way much the same as it was during my dad's career there, and Cincinnati is a big small town. Before you know it, you'll be in Kroger's rustling up some victuals on a Saturday afternoon only to run into somebody and have either them or you call out, "Hey, don't I know you from P & G?" It's never "Excuse me, I think we work at the same place," lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2008, 04:35 PM
 
3,750 posts, read 10,201,548 times
Reputation: 6560
MSLR,

IF you go on P&G's website, they actually have some stuff on their "recruiting" page regarding Cincinnati, and living here.

Too funny that you're from SE Michigan as well!! I lived in Ypsilanti - I left last May when the large fortune 500 employer I worked for announced they'd be shutting down AA operations. I grew up on the East Side of Detroit, so am pretty familiar with the majority of SE Michigan - from Port Huron to Jackson.

Cinci is definitely different from SE Michigan. A little smaller, a little slower. However there's some fabulous stuff going on, and I think if I were single - downtown would definitely be the place to be. We decided on a Canton - like burb (well - Canton 25 years ago) due to a lot of things (age, desire for a large yard, desire for new McMansion like construction, possibility of children in not-too-distant future)... but if I were in my 20's and single - downtown would be it.

Personally, I think Mt. Adams is a blast. Its just got a really awesome feel to it. It is however one of the most pricey areas in the city, so if you're going to consider it - P&G had better be paying you handsomely.

There are plenty of other interesting areas in the city, CBD (central business district), Northside (Kinda similar feeling to Royal Oak in the late '80s before it became super trendy), Clifton (gaslight area near the university), Hyde Park (Yuppies), Oakley (Hyde Park light), O'Byronville (super quirky near Hyde Park).

Covington and Newport just don't do it for me. A lot of people here seem to really be against the suburbs in general (I am not - I will be living in one) - but then they'll suggest Covington and Newport. To me they are just like the suburbs but with old houses. Big Box entertainment in the form of Newport on the Levee and the Aquarium and the German Restaurants. They're almost Disney they're so tourist-trap-y. If you want downtown life, I think Cinci proper is more authentic, eclectic and intersting.

If you want 'burbs - then talk to me and I can give you my take on the local 'burb scene.

One thing - since you're from SE Michigan, Cinci has a vibe that is much more Kentucky/Southern City than typical midwestern. Its kinda odd. Toledo/Cleveland/Pittsburgh/Chicago have a much more similar vibe to Detroit than Cinci does. So just be a little prepared for the differences!!

Anyway - fingers crossed you get the offer!! Feel free to Direct Message me if I can help in any way.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top