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Old 09-27-2008, 07:38 PM
 
5 posts, read 13,502 times
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Originally Posted by goyguy View Post
True dat!
If you're from Chicagoland, think North Shore towns or Barrington; from NYC, Summit or Mendham or Watchung or Ridgewood (NJ), Scarsdale or Great Neck or New Rochelle (NY), Darien or northern Stamford (CT); from Los Angeles, Glendale or maybe Pasadena...
Darien? You're getting a little carried away goyguy. The median home price in Darien is well over $1 million. Darien is in the same class as New Caanan and Greenwich.
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Old 02-12-2009, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Suburban Milwaukee
2 posts, read 3,395 times
Reputation: 10
Default Did you choose Wyoming

Hi. I don't know if you're still reading this thread. We, too, are relocating to the area, and I'm very curious about Wyoming. I keep hearing good things about it, save for that it's "a great town surrounded by bad." Diversity is good; danger is bad. What's the true scoop? THANKS!
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Old 02-12-2009, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
Reputation: 6449
That place is Mayberry, LOL. It's by no means an "island" of security and affluence surrounded by poverty and despair. Woodlawn (to the north) and Lockland (to the east) could be euphemistically termed downscale in the parts which border Wyoming. But both communities are putting in time and money to rejuvenate those areas, with tangible results showing particularly in Lockland.
Cincinnati's Hartwell section abuts Wyoming when you're headed south, and Finneytown is the western neighbor. Tongues have been wagging about those communities because the housing stock is starting to show its age and the "minority" populations are increasing. It's not as though any wholesale "flight" is occurring, though. Finneytown's commercial district, along Winton Rd, is thriving, and though that of Hartwell has seen better times there are businesses that date back to before my parents met which have happily and successfully stayed put. Neither place is in any danger of becoming somewhere you'd want to detour around, far from it.
Socioeconomically, the portions of Wyoming that're along its borders mirror the locales across the line. It's not like you transition from mansions to shantytowns in the blink of an eye. The "popular image" of the town is that of WASP's and wealth, but all classes have sections that they call home and there's a rich mix of racial and religious backgrounds to be found in its residents. With the schools as excellent as they are, nearly everybody sends their kids to them. The non-academic lessons to be had about all sorts of people have served me well throughout my life.
My parents, well into their seventies and Wyomingites for over half a century, have never stopped loving how Dad happened to find his first housing situation there when newly arrived in Cincinnati to start his career. They'll be staying where they are until it's no longer physically possible - and probably after that, too, knowing the stubbornness of one of them the way I do. And when a grocery run can't wait for the next morning, Dad has no qualms about making the trip to supposedly "bad" Hartwell and its all-night Kroger's. Though I wrote what I just wrote, they have the means to pick up and leave if anything remotely negative about living in Wyoming so much as faintly appears on the horizon. Such isn't the case.
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Old 02-12-2009, 09:11 PM
 
455 posts, read 1,668,506 times
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Lockland is poor and run down but really not that (violent) crime ridden. A guy was found shot to death in his car a few months ago but that was closer to Arlington Heights and it was drug related. The houses in Wyoming are absolutely beautiful as most people here will tell you. It just depends on how isolated from activities (involving businesses open after dark) you mind being. There is a small strip of non-essential shops that is not even a fourth of a mile long. You could probably walk to a lunch cafe that looks like tea room for older women and a 90's-tastic bistro there but it seems like a quiet area where you would mostly stay at home or join a bridge club with P&G upper management-types at night.
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Old 02-12-2009, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
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LMAO!!!
It's a great place to raise kids, but when the kids hit high school it gets old REAL quick. As I said last time, it's Mayberry.
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Old 02-13-2009, 04:12 AM
 
Location: Hartwell--IN THE City of Cincinnati
1,055 posts, read 3,560,693 times
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Hartwell, which Goyguy referred to is south of Wyoming and part of the City of Cincinnati. Hartwell is a great neighborhood with a mix of craftman style homes and large victorians. The Vine Street Business district is going through a study right now and the information collected from business owners and residents will help develope a master plan for the area. There is a new Recreation Center slated to open in May 2009 and the k-8 school is under construction with a completion frame of the fall of 2010.
Hartwell has low crime and what calls for service the police do receive from this area is mostly for nusiance calls instead of violent crime.
We are happy with our neighborhood and the great neighbors we have who love to get together. We are also quite happy with a recent appraisal of our home which shows we have made a good investment in this neighborhood...
Hartwell is a very good neighborhood and very safe and most importantly, there are residents who live here who work to keep it that way. THAT is what makes Hartwell a great place to live.
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Old 02-28-2009, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Suburban Milwaukee
2 posts, read 3,395 times
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To Goygoy, HuskerDo and Hartwell Girl, thank you SO MUCH for your responses. I was actually in the area yesterday on my first house-hunting trip, and drop both through Wyoming and its surrounding neighborhoods, and all is good. At this point, I'm more concerned about the WASP and snobbiness issue than the perceived "Bad" areas boardering Wyoming. Although it is quite beautiful and has gorgeous housing stock, It's almost TOO Mayberry! But I appreciate everyone's responses so much.
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Old 03-01-2009, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
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The snobbishness is definitely there, but it's overstated. True, you have the "village" area which tends to set the tone since it's centrally situated. But Wyoming is far from being only big houses on tree-lined streets that have names which begin with "W." (And let's not forget the metal flower holders around every street-sign pole!) Many people there like to picture the whole town as being that way in their minds and attitudes. Their world's parameters are the non-essential (spot-on call by HuskerDu) shopping districts, the church of their choice, the Civic Center, and the Wyoming Golf Club.
But Wyoming has changed with the times - somewhat. Many of the old-money families' scions have "headed for the (Indian) Hill," or moved up the road to Glendale. Protestant tongues clicked feverishly when housing covenants were outlawed and the school system helped draw hundreds of Jewish families fleeing neighborhood turnover in Cincinnati. The kids cared about that a lot less, so the transition from >95% Christian to maybe 70% went OK. The "colored section" with its own class divisions is no longer the only place of residence for AA families; a few Whites have settled there, and Black households are now scattered throughout town with no discomfort on anyone's part. (When the first "pioneers" moved onto my parents' block, the folks despite their Southern upbringing were unfazed - "they're P & G'ers.")
As far as economic classes are concerned, there've always been sections of Wyoming where you don't have to be a doctor or an executive with Procter - rhyme intended. Similarly to not enough American communities, teachers and cops can make a home within the community that they serve. Although they're not in the tone-setting center of town, these neighborhoods are woven into the municipal fabric south of Wyoming Ave and east of Burns then westward all the way to "the Pike" from Clark Ave to the city line. Across the Pike towards Hartwell, Sherry + Euclid + West Mills + St Clair comprise the other "affordable" area. On the other side of town, things get less pretentious on either side of the Pike starting with the "V" streets (Vale and Vermont) and stay that way until Woodlawn.
I'm always glad to offer the perspectives of a native Wyomingite, though the opinions are of course only my own. You could name a specific address, and if I didn't know anybody who lives/lived in that house I could still rattle on about the street - LOL!
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Old 03-02-2009, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Mount Pleasant, SC
1,791 posts, read 2,296,338 times
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Default Fleming Meadows

If there's a house for sale off of Fleming Road at the western end of town Buy IT! We left there for warmer climes 8 months ago and truly miss our neighbors. No snobs there I can assure you. Great mix of young & maturing families. We were the "odd ones" raising foster children & lowering the achievement statistics at the high school. But our neighbors were always there to be the true "village" our kids needed. I hope you find the right home for you.
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Old 03-03-2009, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
Reputation: 6449
I was in a kids' baseball league that played on the fields which gave way to Fleming Meadows. Subdivisions, like malls, have a tendency to be named for what was replaced (LOL.)
Some time back, there was a thread here about the worst street names in Hamilton County. My personal #1 is located in that development - Flembrook. What were they thinking???
Joyeaux is right about the feel of the place, though. You can't walk to anything but a Unitarian church and the old Jim Crow cemetery, and despite its narrow hilliness lead feet love to floor it on Fleming. But the "Meadows" conjure up the Mayberry aspect of Wyoming. Neighbors are always out on the streets in warmer weather strolling and chatting, and there is an unusually good mix of generations (though not ethnicities) to be found there.
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