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Old 11-04-2010, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,733,381 times
Reputation: 2058

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UC has very rigorous programs. It is the most academically-rigorous public school in Ohio. There is a reason the architecture, design, and engineering programs are ranked top in the country - they are H-A-R-D and produce quality grads who know their stuff.
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Old 11-04-2010, 11:04 PM
 
73 posts, read 135,978 times
Reputation: 52
It would cost much more to enroll if UC weren't supported by Ohio taxpayers. But since UC must be a for-profit venture(? what? it's not?), some myopic neanderthals on this forum wouldn't be for the expenditure of public funds for the greater good of our society.

And good luck getting transportation to a private-funded only UC, without publicly subsidized bus, streetcar, and interstate highway systems (how profitable has the interstates been for US? Indirectly -very, directly -worse than Amtrak).

One thing never changes: the undereducated but overly sure of themselves will continue to opine on the internets that free markets uber alles and that we are all on our own in this society. It's funny how the oldest fogies aren't old enough to remember Hoover.

Reap what you sow, neo-Hooverites. Congratulations on your election Tuesday of a Hooverite neanderthal to the governor's office.
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Old 11-05-2010, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
OP, if your major is in the DAAP it should be eligible for Co-op - right? To me this is still the greatest development in higher education, founded at UC in 1906. I was a Co-op student in Engineering (Mechanical) 1957-1962. My son was a Co-op stuent in Engineering (Civil) 1981-1986. Business times were slow during my period, we were put to work painting machines in the factory and putting on a new roof. But at least it was work. My son went the first two years with no Co-op job, there were none to be had. We were able to pay the tuition to keep him in school continuously. I told him, regardless of what the coordinators said, get out there and pound the pavement for you own Co-op job, if you find one they will accept it. He finally found a position with the City of Kettering South of Dayton. He loved it. But when he graduated they still wre not in a position to hire full time, so he had to go elsewhere.

Back in 2006 I was invited to the 100th anniversay observation of the founding of the Co-op program at UC. Part of this was because my original company (LeBlond) was among the founders of the Co-op program, and I represented a three-generation Engineering family, my father-in-law in Chemical, myself, and my son. Following the dedication of the original Herman Schneider Memorial (the Dean credited with starting the Co-op program), we were invited to a nice luncheon, etc.I began to question those faculty members present as to what percentage of the current graduates were able to complete their education without any significant student loans. The response I received were very few, but I had to understand the Co-op program was primarily an educational, not a financial, endeavor. I told them Yes I understood, they had managed to destroy one of the best higher ecducational systems ever devised.

I have not been back there since then, and don't intend to ever return. One of the best systems of education, the Co-op, founded in Cincinnati, has now been reduced to the pablum we find everywhere.
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Old 11-05-2010, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,733,381 times
Reputation: 2058
kjbrill

i don't think that is true, that the co-op program is "pablum found everywhere." the co-op students graduate with a ton of experience and usually have a job in hand at that time. plus, they are paid competitive wages over substantial chunks of time, so their debt loads are less and their salary higher than most college grads. it may not be what it was, things have changed - but it is still a unique program that results in successful grads.
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Old 11-05-2010, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
Yea I hear you things have changed. But in what direction? Why does a world class program such as the Co-op at UC have to go backwards when it comes to providing an education for those who could least afford it? My father-in-law and I represent those from a time when there were zero college graduates in the family and the Co-op program made the difference. And many of my classmates were in the same boat. Tell my how true that is today.

And where is it written that overburdening student loans should be part of a college education? I come from an era where my parents provided me room and board, and the Co-op covered my tuition. When I graduated my parents and I had zero debt. This was also true of my brother who was 4 years behind me. Sorry, but I am not at all a favorite of how universitites and colleges are currently running their operations. If the emphasis was on education fine, but as long as it is on the prestige which comes from government grants for research, business modeling, studies for everything under the sun, no thanks.

If you want to call me pessimistic - YES!!! Glad I am at the age I am so I will likely not see all of my grand-children reach adulthood. The thoughts of what they are facing places me in more than a depressive mood.

My parents desired I have an easier life than they did, which I believe is basically true. I wanted my kids to have a life at least equal to mine, which I believe overall they have achieved. But when I look at the grand-kids I think OMG. It begins with education. My oldest grand-kid will be attempting to go to college next year. Because of all the cajoling from his father and myself, he will be enrolling in the Engineering program at UC. I just wish I honestly felt he had the same opportrunity as myself and his father when we went through there.
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Old 11-07-2010, 01:19 AM
 
73 posts, read 72,592 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by cincity View Post
It would cost much more to enroll if UC weren't supported by Ohio taxpayers. But since UC must be a for-profit venture(? what? it's not?), some myopic neanderthals on this forum wouldn't be for the expenditure of public funds for the greater good of our society.

And good luck getting transportation to a private-funded only UC, without publicly subsidized bus, streetcar, and interstate highway systems (how profitable has the interstates been for US? Indirectly -very, directly -worse than Amtrak).

One thing never changes: the undereducated but overly sure of themselves will continue to opine on the internets that free markets uber alles and that we are all on our own in this society. It's funny how the oldest fogies aren't old enough to remember Hoover.

Reap what you sow, neo-Hooverites. Congratulations on your election Tuesday of a Hooverite neanderthal to the governor's office.

If you knew something about Economics, you would be frightening.

B.A., Government and Economics
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Old 11-12-2010, 01:25 PM
 
11 posts, read 9,284 times
Reputation: 34
Okay so I need to reply to a lot of the things I am reading here, the subject is even going a little off-topic about the whole co-op thing.

Original Question:
Urban Development? That is from UC's renowned DAAP college. That particular school is a very big strong point for UC. You should be comparing that program to equivalent programs at other colleges that offer it. But from what I HEAR everything DAAP is good. So as an engineering student I have no immediate concern about the quality of the program itself, but that is why I also say you should do research into that specific program vs. those from other universities.

UC's in-state tuition is expected to be $10,000 for a full-year of tuition & fees for 2010-2011 (UC Costs, University of Cincinnati). That is a little on the higher side for the state. Honestly, at one point I'm positive I read that UC was the most expensive PUBLIC school in the state of Ohio. Not sure about that anymore. Do your research.

I chose UC over OSU because of how enclosed the campus is and how things aren't sprawled out and I do not have to literally cross active busy streets to go from one building to another. Granted UC is split into two campuses (West & East) but you're usually at one or another. Most are on West. East is medical. Plus there are shuttles running between all the campuses.

Also let me address 1 concerning post I seen:
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill
I began to question those faculty members present as to what percentage of the current graduates were able to complete their education without any significant student loans. The response I received were very few, but I had to understand the Co-op program was primarily an educational, not a financial, endeavor. I told them Yes I understood, they had managed to destroy one of the best higher ecducational systems ever devised.

I have not been back there since then, and don't intend to ever return. One of the best systems of education, the Co-op, founded in Cincinnati, has now been reduced to the pablum we find everywhere.
It sounds like you think UC somehow has watered down their co-op program in some way that it has resulted in students getting paid less?
How much a student gets paid is a factor of the company they work for, their year in school (a sophomore gets paid less than a senior), their grades (some companies base pay off of GPA), their MAJOR (CME make more than mechanical, etc.), and location of the company. Additionally, not only does the amount a student is paid affect the necessity to take out loans, but also the expenses each student has varies too. Someone originally from Cincinnati can remain living with parents, and take the bus to school, leaving them with only tuition & books to pay for. Meanwhile someone from a different city for instance has to cover room & board also. PLUS if you work for co-op with a company out of town, you'll usually have to pay 10-50% of your moving & housing costs there also, so you may end up being able to save only enough money to cover the quarter $3,600+ tuition & book fees. Everything else must be paid for through a part-time job or loans. Ontop of all that, tuition here at UC keeps increasing EVERY YEAR. It's now at like $3,600/qtr or so now just for tuition and fees, and then engineering has an additional $200 fee. Also, FYI, with the recent economic conditions, there were numerous UC Eng. students who couldn't even FIND open co-op positions. UC's division of professional practice works decently to partner with local, national, and international companies to setup co-op opportunities for students. Students also can find co-ops for themselves.

There are also additional factors that affect a student's income vs. cost profile here. But I honestly do not think UC has done anything to affect how much students are paid as they work their co-op jobs. That is really up to the companies, as long as they are not intentionally low-balling the student. Instead, UC has continually raised tuition, apartments around UC (in Clifton) are expensive, books are VERY EXPENSIVE for engineering and math courses. It really is honestly about the educational experience these days because you cannot depend on co-op to cover all of your educational expenses anymore. Depending on how a student lives and the expenses they need to cover for themselves, they could be on co-op and still have considerable loan debt. I know students who've co-op'd and are still looking at 30k in loan debt upon graduation. Mommy & Daddy can't cover much more than cell phones and health insurance if they didn't plan ahead. This is not 1960 anymore.

As a current student there is so much I could say about UC and and the neighborhood of Clifton. UC is decent. Clifton does have crime issues, students get emails everyday about crime. The crime here is comparable to that of any major university in an urban area, especially near downtown (see: OSU and Akron University). But if you want to go live in a bubble, you'll be paying bubble money or have less opportunities for extra-circular and social activities. This is just the reality of operating a university in large city. So really it's a rich multi-faced learning experience for students here in personal finance, street smarts, common sense, and politics.

Please, Vision-Quest, if you have any further questions, let me know, I'd be glad to answer them the best I can.
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Old 11-12-2010, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
Dear positive.feelings...

You are right, it is not 1960 anymore, and for that I will lament, lament, and lament. If the pay being granted Co-ops from their respective companies is fair and equitable for the times, than just what has changed? That is very simple, the fees which UC and the rest of the universities charge. Just find some charts showing the cost of college education vs. average family income or any other barometer you would like to use for a measurement. The rise in cost of a college education has outstripped inflation, rise in family income, just about any other basis you would like to use. The situation is the typical graduate, at a time in their life when they should be looking forward to a career with enthusiasm, and also to getting married and starting a family, has to address these enormous loans they have encountered and how to repay them.

Sorry my friend, UC had the better idea but has failed to carry through. If UC can convince you the Co-op program is strictly a better education, then my advice is go somewhere you can graduate in 4 rather than 5 years.
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