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View Poll Results: Cincinnati, Louisville, or Lexington
Cincinnati 46 66.67%
Louisville 13 18.84%
Lexington 10 14.49%
Voters: 69. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-10-2010, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Temporarily in Pawtucket, R.I.
269 posts, read 631,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JefferyT View Post
....I've heard that Louisville is strangely set up, too.

It's laid out using the generic US street grid, like Cincinnati, Dayton, Lexington, Indianapolis, and every other city in this part of the US.

You've "heard it was strangely set up..."? There is this thing called a "map"....
Cincinnati doesn't use the generic street grid layout like most other cities. The only part of the city that uses the grid layout is downtown. Once you get out of downtown, the hills in the city start to increase, especially on the westside, which doesn't constitute well with using the grid.

Cities that use the "true" grid system will have avenues that run east and west across the city and have numbered streets (E.55th, W.153rd) that run well into residential neighborhoods or sometimes even out into the suburbs. Cinci doesn't have one street (at least not that I know of) that can take you directly from the east side of town to the west. Again, it would be difficult for Cinci to have this layout because of its topography.

Those who say Louisville is strangely set up( if you're referring to street layout) need to visit more and larger cities, then you will think Cincinnati is "strangely set up." It took me forever to learn my way around the whole city. I feel if you can master the streets of Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, or San Franciso, you can navigate any city with ease.

BTW, I voted for Cincinnati.
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Old 01-10-2010, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
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I think they use street grids in Cincy where topography permits (in the basin of course, but on the hills too), but the hill & valley character really does skew this.
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Old 01-10-2010, 01:07 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,409,188 times
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First, Cincinnati wasn't really "set up." Cincinnati predates modern urban planning and most of what we think of as Cincinnati wasn't even there for the first hundred years or so.

Second, River Road does go from east to west along the river. Look at it as US 50. For a east west artery further north, try 126.

Cincinnati is a real city, whereas Lexington (much as I love it) is really more like a big village or town. Once you get past the horse thing, there isn't much there except beautiful landscape and lovely architecture. Louisville is a city, but its a redneck city. Don't get me wrong, I like Louisville and I like rednecks. But, its a pick up truck type of place. You have to say it like Elvis would have said it: Lowelvull. Say it real slow: Lowel . . vull. Anyway, I could live in any of the three, but if I lived in Lexington or Louisville, it would just be a nicer suburb of Cincinnati to me.
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Old 01-10-2010, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
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Lexington is sort of like a provincial German city. There is a set of cities over there that are sort of these smaller regional places, like, say Fulda or Wurzburg or such, that aren't really based on industry.

Lexington reminds me of that.

But yes this is a very apples/oranges comparison. And not just in population.

Louisvilles metropolitan economy, or gross metropolitan product, was $47.4B in 2008. Cincinnati's was $81.8B, nearly double. So an entire different league in terms of what Cincy can support.

Yet the Cincinnati economy, while doing well compared to other Ohio cities, is weaker than Louisville, Lexington, or Indianapolis, for that matter.

Lexingtons and Louisvilles economies grew at a faster rate than Cincinnati, between 2001 and 2008. Louisville grew by 9.8%, Lexington grew by an impressive 16.7%. Indianapolis grew by 10.8%

By comparison, Cincinnati's metro economy grew by 7.16%, a few points less than Louisville.
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Old 01-10-2010, 04:44 PM
 
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I mean strangely set up as in the entire Metro...haha...sorry. But my grandma lived there and said its wierd because it seems like there isn't any sense of identity. It's just a big copy of St. Louis and Cincinnati style towns. Thats what I've been told. And I hear that the traffic is horrible even in the suburbs.
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Old 01-10-2010, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
1,225 posts, read 3,878,053 times
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^
Got it.

You are correct about the identity. The suburbs of Dayton and Cincinnati seem to have considerably more identity as identifiable towns (depending on the suburb), and are larger, so they are viable local governments. While Louisville has plenty of suburbs they are mostly just a bunch of incorporated subdivisions. There are very few suburbs that have a "town" feeling like, say, Englewood or West Carollton or Reading or Sharonville.

The surface traffic in Louisville is pretty bad, particulary on the East End (the eastern suburbs). In the city there are certain roads that are pretty congested, like Bardstown Road. Dayton has relatively light traffic in comparison (except for some hot spots).

Freeway traffic is usually better if there isn't road work. They have 12 lane expressways there, so plenty of capacity, it seems.
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Old 01-13-2010, 12:51 PM
 
6,295 posts, read 13,176,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilson1010 View Post
First, Cincinnati wasn't really "set up." Cincinnati predates modern urban planning and most of what we think of as Cincinnati wasn't even there for the first hundred years or so.

Second, River Road does go from east to west along the river. Look at it as US 50. For a east west artery further north, try 126.

Cincinnati is a real city, whereas Lexington (much as I love it) is really more like a big village or town. Once you get past the horse thing, there isn't much there except beautiful landscape and lovely architecture. Louisville is a city, but its a redneck city. Don't get me wrong, I like Louisville and I like rednecks. But, its a pick up truck type of place. You have to say it like Elvis would have said it: Lowelvull. Say it real slow: Lowel . . vull. Anyway, I could live in any of the three, but if I lived in Lexington or Louisville, it would just be a nicer suburb of Cincinnati to me.
Louisville a pickup truck redneck town? Really? I see just about as much culture in Louisville as I do in Cincinnati, even though its metro is a good clip larger. Louisville is far from a "redneck city." You are quite confused and probably banking on stereotypes or one or two limited experiences. You don't think Louisville has millions and now billions of projects going on in its downtown? Louisville has just as much as a college prescence as Cincy and I'd argue UofL sports are as big as anything in Cincy, at least to the locals. I have seen people from the OH forums get all upset when the slightest negative remarks are made about Ohio cities, but the comments I am seeing in this thread are outright derogatory stereotypes.

Last edited by Peter1948; 01-13-2010 at 01:03 PM..
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Old 01-13-2010, 12:55 PM
 
6,295 posts, read 13,176,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cincyfan79 View Post
Cincinnati without a doubt, followed by Lexington and as a last resort Louisville. Cincy has so much growth right now, OTR revitalization, the Banks, the new casino, Great American Tower, Streetcars, and fountain square. More people are moving downtown too which is making it more of a 24hr city with new restaurants and stores popping up all over. Cincy also gets to share in NKY's history and the attractions in Covington, Newport.... Sports alone too makes Cincy the winner, Bengals, Reds, Cyclones, Bearcats, Musketeers.... As far as Lexington its a nice town but too small. Basically a giant suburb with a few tall buildings. But they do have the Wildcats so that should count. Louisville just sucks. Nasty city, boring design, no life downtown, and that weird county/city government sham to make it seem like a real city. No sports or entertainment and too many right wing conservative nut jobs in KY.
I hate to tell you, but Louisville's downtown is more vibrant than Cincinnati's at night, although Cincy's has gotten much better with a lot of recent club and restaurant openings.
If you hate Louisville so much, you should hate Cincy, because they really have a lot in common. Although Louisville is a good stretch smaller in the metro area, the urban areas both pride themselves on good architecture, strong urban and walkable neighborhoods, hilly terrain, great parks, and friendly people. Both cities are great for restaurants and the arts and they "grew up" together in the 19th century. I am seeing alot of misconceptions about Louisville here. Perhaps Louisville has this reputation dating from the 1970's and 80's?
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Old 01-13-2010, 01:02 PM
 
6,295 posts, read 13,176,543 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by JefferyT View Post
....I've heard that Louisville is strangely set up, too.

It's laid out using the generic US street grid, like Cincinnati, Dayton, Lexington, Indianapolis, and every other city in this part of the US.

You've "heard it was strangely set up..."? There is this thing called a "map"....
Most of the people posting here seem ignorant of just how many amenities Louisville offers. I am now living in Florida and it has the same image. I am not sure if Louisville can shed that image and I am not sure how it got that image, but I suppose you cannot garner much street cred as a city when you are located in KY.
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Old 01-13-2010, 11:13 PM
 
2,204 posts, read 5,843,647 times
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Louisville's metro is 1.24 million
Cincinnati's metro is 2.15 million

... this isn't a "good stretch," ... this is almost double.

Don't get the inferior complex thing going, and just ignore it. Both are cool cities.
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