U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 12-19-2009, 06:28 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,435,726 times
Reputation: 8244

Advertisements

I don't know why this thread was revived, but for cats the only way to go is Cat Calls. Dr. Lawrence is exactly what you would want in a cat vet: skilled, cautious, and a real lover of cats.

They bring the mobile cat hospital to you for a few more dollars than you would pay at a stationary office.

Here's the link:

http://www.catcalls.info/site/view/73200_AboutUs.pml
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-06-2011, 08:02 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,008 times
Reputation: 10
i have a 12 year old cat that has a tooth that has got infected and i took him to the vet yesterday and they told me it would cost around 1200 dollars to pull all his teeth because of a gum infection, i waitress for living and i just can't aford this, doe's anyone know a cheaper vet in cinti
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2011, 08:09 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,435,726 times
Reputation: 8244
Start with a second opinion. Start with Dr. Ryan at Red Bank Veterinary Hospital. Cat infections are usually cleared up pretty quickly. Post this question on the cat forum also.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2011, 10:38 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,955,279 times
Reputation: 1499
Depending on what part of town you're in, College Hill Vet Clinic is VERY GOOD. I'm sorry to say that they're rather expensive, but I do think they'd give you a solid, honest second opinion.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2011, 06:31 PM
 
77 posts, read 169,131 times
Reputation: 60
I told my wife who is a Registered Veterinary Technician about your dilemma. She alleges that pulling the tooth is pretty routine and that reputable vet could do it for under $200 easily.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2011, 11:13 PM
 
1 posts, read 843 times
Reputation: 10
Default good advise

It sounds like your cat has more than a "tooth infection" if a veterinarian quoted $1200 to "fix" the problem. It sounds like a full mouth extraction was recommended which is the only safe cure for a disease called lymphocytic/plasmocytic gingivitis which your cat may have. Also, stay away from any hospital that would employ a veterinary technician who #1, feels that she is qualified(she is not) to quote a price on a procedure when the vet that she works for hasn't even seen the cat and #2, insinuates that any vet that charges more than $200.00 to correct this problem is not a reputable vet. Call Dr Auvil at Grady Animal Hospital for a real second opinion. He is a board certified veterinary dentist.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2011, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,374,610 times
Reputation: 1920
It is always a problem when you have a problem with a pet. Our youngest daughter has been moving recently, changed jobs, no place to live yet, living with his parents, needed to board their male cat until things worked out. So we have had the male cat, name Angel, for the past severl months.

Our female cat, Casey, was originally from the same daughter when she was a sophomore in high school in 1990. Casey was obtained from the Warren Co. animal shelter. When the daughter went off to college and then married she left the cat here. So Casey is more than 20 years old. A striped common tabby, but a joy to us. Casey decided right off she did not like the invasion from this male cat. She can throw an unbelievable hissy fit - sounds like a wild animal.

The daughter and family finally have a rented place to live, and came today to take Angel home. Casey will have the full domain of her house to enjoy and we can get back to normal.

Casey has a swollen salivary gland according to the vet. Medication has not reduced the swelling. The vet says it is not cancerous. Anytime you have a 20 year old animal and such a condition shows up you are concerned. Hoping it will be corrected, but trying to understand reality. The older they get the more attached you are, and the thought of losing them the more difficult. She sleeps every night in the middle of our bed between us. Her recent few trips to the vet are the only times she has been out of the house in the 20 plus years. Whenever we have gone on vacation, etc. we have had someone come in and feed her. We can leave the exterior doors wide open and she just stares out and turns around to the confines of her house.

If she passes, we will likely be up at the shelter the next day to get a kitten and start the cycle over.

I have my limits as to how much I will spend on a pet. But when you get old like us, these limits can increase. The loss of a pet can be hard to take, particularlly one you have had for over 20 years.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2011, 01:21 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,955,279 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
It is always a problem when you have a problem with a pet. Our youngest daughter has been moving recently, changed jobs, no place to live yet, living with his parents, needed to board their male cat until things worked out. So we have had the male cat, name Angel, for the past severl months.

Our female cat, Casey, was originally from the same daughter when she was a sophomore in high school in 1990. Casey was obtained from the Warren Co. animal shelter. When the daughter went off to college and then married she left the cat here. So Casey is more than 20 years old. A striped common tabby, but a joy to us. Casey decided right off she did not like the invasion from this male cat. She can throw an unbelievable hissy fit - sounds like a wild animal.

The daughter and family finally have a rented place to live, and came today to take Angel home. Casey will have the full domain of her house to enjoy and we can get back to normal.

Casey has a swollen salivary gland according to the vet. Medication has not reduced the swelling. The vet says it is not cancerous. Anytime you have a 20 year old animal and such a condition shows up you are concerned. Hoping it will be corrected, but trying to understand reality. The older they get the more attached you are, and the thought of losing them the more difficult. She sleeps every night in the middle of our bed between us. Her recent few trips to the vet are the only times she has been out of the house in the 20 plus years. Whenever we have gone on vacation, etc. we have had someone come in and feed her. We can leave the exterior doors wide open and she just stares out and turns around to the confines of her house.

If she passes, we will likely be up at the shelter the next day to get a kitten and start the cycle over.

I have my limits as to how much I will spend on a pet. But when you get old like us, these limits can increase. The loss of a pet can be hard to take, particularlly one you have had for over 20 years.
Hubby and I've always had three cats at a time. It seemed to be a number that worked well for us.

We lost our 17-year-old Maine Coon mix, a big, sweet, friendly, grey tabby named Chester, in August. We don't really have anyone we can pass our cats on to if they outlive us. And we know from sad experience that it can be impossible for an older cat to make the transition to an entirely new family.

We do still have two relative youngsters (5 and 6), but we made the decision that we're too old to adopt another kitten. One of these cats would probably not accept another adult cat, so there won't be another adoption. This is probably the most saddening thing related to aging that I've had to accept so far.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2011, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,374,610 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
Hubby and I've always had three cats at a time. It seemed to be a number that worked well for us.

We lost our 17-year-old Maine Coon mix, a big, sweet, friendly, grey tabby named Chester, in August. We don't really have anyone we can pass our cats on to if they outlive us. And we know from sad experience that it can be impossible for an older cat to make the transition to an entirely new family.

We do still have two relative youngsters (5 and 6), but we made the decision that we're too old to adopt another kitten. One of these cats would probably not accept another adult cat, so there won't be another adoption. This is probably the most saddening thing related to aging that I've had to accept so far.
Sarah... Understand what you are saying. I grew up with dogs as a boy and we had dogs for many years after marrying. In fact we had two dogs 20 plus years ago when the daughter asked to bring Casey into the house. The youngest dog survived a decent number of years. But we realize we are too old to take good care of a dog now, so we have become cat people. Everything they say about cats being aloof and contrary is true. If we get a young cat which outlives us, we will just have to place a condition in the will obligating one of the kids who left us with both a dog and a cat to be responsible.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2011, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,374,610 times
Reputation: 1920
A followup. We realized last week our old cat was going blind. After a few days of watching her bump into all of the walls in the house and not knowing where she was, we realized it was time to put her down. So we did that this week. After only two days of not having the cat around, when you have had one for about 20 years, it gave us a big empty feeling. So off today we went to the SPCA. Came home with an adult, female, DSH, about the same size and appearance of the one we lost but darker in color. For about the last 10 hours she has been exploring our house. She is already jumping up into the lap of my wife in her recliner to be pet. She is an adult, not a kitten. I believe once acclimated to her new surroundings she will be fine. Us animal parents just have to realize we need them.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top