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Old 12-26-2008, 02:54 PM
 
561 posts, read 1,779,381 times
Reputation: 276

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I've noticed that lots of people talk about how Cincinnati is such a conservative city. Would people care to elaborate on these sentiments?

So far this has not been my experience at all. I've seen that the suburbs are dominated by Republicans, however city limits seem heavily Democrat. Look at the elected officials! Furthermore, many of these so-called "conservatives" just seem to be Catholics that are maybe conservative on a couple social issues, but overwhelmingly leftist economically.

In fact, Cincinnati seems rather left-of-center when it comes to economic freedom issues. Lots of pro-union, tax the rich, over-regulate business types seem to live here compared to some other parts of the country.

I can certainly see how Cincinnati is more conservative than large cities in the Northeast or West Coast; however such cities are so overwhelmingly liberal that any other city might seem conservative by comparison.

So what's the deal?

Have I somehow managed to completely surround myself with the only liberals in Cincinnati? Or when people complain about "conservatives" are they just narrowly referring to religious people? Or is it that some people are used to a city that's 90% left wing and they only find Cincy overly conservative by comparison?
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Old 12-26-2008, 03:30 PM
 
455 posts, read 1,668,658 times
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It's more conservative in the non-political sense of the word. People just seem to take longer to open up down here and are more no-nonsense by my observations. Could it be the German roots?
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:47 PM
 
Location: East Walnut Hills
189 posts, read 600,895 times
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On the outside, Cincinnati seems conservative. We have Simon Leis as our sheriff. He is the ultra-conservative. Throwing out Larry Flint, and all, ...people in Cincy keep electing Simon Leis!! And for the most part, he runs unopposed!!

I think people in Cincinnati are scared of change. But it is time for a change.
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Old 12-27-2008, 12:55 AM
 
Location: SF
96 posts, read 276,767 times
Reputation: 69
Cincinnati is hesitant of change, but the city itself is definitely democratic.

As for Leis, that's a county thing, and the original poster is correct about that. The suburbs (including hamilton county burbs, the reason this guy is still sheriff) are overwhelmingly conservative in every sense of the word, giving the city an undeserved reputation.
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Old 12-27-2008, 05:48 AM
 
3,750 posts, read 10,203,909 times
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I think you're probably right on the suburbs values being confused with the City's. I know for myself, when someone outside of Ohio asks where I live, I say "Cincinnati" (even though I live in Lebanon). The same thing happened all the time when I lived in Chicago (I did live in the CITY of Chicago) -- suburbanites from Oak Park or Barrington or any other number of suburbs would always say they lived in "Chicago" -- because people from outside the area have never heard of their suburb.

If a longer conversation is occurring, I'll say I live "between Cinci and Dayton in a small town called Lebanon" -- but usually just shorten it to "Cincinnati".

When I grew up (just E. of Detroit, in the 'burbs) and went out of state to college - it was the same. I'm from Detroit. No one in New Mexico has heard of St. Clair Shores, MI ...

People pretty naturally talk about the nearest URBAN center to them. So when people say "Cinci" is conservative, they're really saying the Cinci Metro Area is conservative.

I would agree with that, as it seems to me that the ridiculously heavy conservatism in the 'burbs just outweighs the liberalism in Cinci proper. Maybe that's beginning to change somewhat (yay!), but at the moment - you are left with the impression of conservatism.
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Old 12-28-2008, 10:23 PM
 
2,204 posts, read 5,843,647 times
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In your guys opinion, since statistics show that Cincinnati and now even Hamilton county vote democrat, what makes Cincinnati socially conservative ... compared to a liberal city? ... and what liberal city would you compare it to size-wise?
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Old 12-28-2008, 11:30 PM
 
Location: SF
96 posts, read 276,767 times
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As for size, I'd say Portland or Baltimore.

The conservativism to me is in the mainstream complacency, general parochialism, late adaptation to national or global trends, and inability to see the possibilities that exist with the city and region.

These are hardly unique to Cincinnati, which is part of the reason why I defend it when others suggest it is conservative and backward.
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Old 12-29-2008, 08:15 AM
 
2,204 posts, read 5,843,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CiNYC View Post
The conservativism to me is in the mainstream complacency, general parochialism, late adaptation to national or global trends, and inability to see the possibilities that exist with the city and region.
What are some examples?
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Old 12-29-2008, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Louisville, KY
12 posts, read 31,788 times
Reputation: 15
Smile hm, eco villages

well...in my experience of traveling to cinci..i have definitely seen the more liberal side and recently have found out about an eco village that is right next to the downtown area that highly influences the city..check it out! Enright Ridge Urban Eco-Village Error
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Old 12-30-2008, 10:09 AM
 
1,071 posts, read 3,938,008 times
Reputation: 265
The Cincinnati area is hesitant to change, as CiNYC mentioned, but so are a number of cities. It's the politics that suggest there are a lot of people in the region that take the Bible to the polls, aren't open to integration, and believe that the presence of minorities is the root of Cincinnati's problems.
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