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Old 01-09-2009, 09:19 AM
 
2,204 posts, read 5,857,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
And therin is the rub. Cities like Indianapolis lost blocks of downtown residential housing for parking lots in the 1960's Today those lots have been rebuilt with infill housing but the historic feel of the downtown is gone. Cincinnati seems destined to follow a failed urban model of spending thousands to bulldoze 120 yr old homes in the 'hope' that 'someday' someone will rebuild on them. It took 45 years for that to happen in Indianapolis, yet there is not a single unrestored home in the citie's downtown neighbrohoods that were left and they are some of thr most expensive and as a result most tax generating residential properties in the city. So if Cincinnati folows that model is will be about 2055 before the downtown is redone.

With all due respect to Indy ...

There is nothing close to Cincy's housing stock in the midwest, outside of parts of Detroit, STL, and bits and pieces of Chicago.

Also, OTR was the most dense neighborhoods ever assembled in the midwest and one of the most dense in the nation. Tons of buildings have come down in OTR, but I don't foresee anything like a "total demolition" ever happening. There are people in high places that reside in OTR and it's also on the National Historic Register, which gives it somewhat of a strict protection. It's not like builders can just go in and demo a building because they want to build another building in its place.
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Old 01-09-2009, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Hartwell--IN THE City of Cincinnati
1,055 posts, read 3,571,611 times
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I looked on the Citys web site and it appears there was an objection to the demo on 12/4--trying to get more info now.
Okay, here's the 411..the Owner, NOT the City filed permits to demo the building. The demo HAS BEEN objected from the Citys Historic Conservation group. Demo is on hold at this time.

Last edited by Hartwell Girl; 01-09-2009 at 09:46 AM.. Reason: Obtained more info....
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Old 01-09-2009, 10:21 AM
 
1,071 posts, read 3,947,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
And therin is the rub. Cities like Indianapolis lost blocks of downtown residential housing for parking lots in the 1960's Today those lots have been rebuilt with infill housing but the historic feel of the downtown is gone. Cincinnati seems destined to follow a failed urban model of spending thousands to bulldoze 120 yr old homes in the 'hope' that 'someday' someone will rebuild on them. It took 45 years for that to happen in Indianapolis, yet there is not a single unrestored home in the citie's downtown neighbrohoods that were left and they are some of thr most expensive and as a result most tax generating residential properties in the city. So if Cincinnati folows that model is will be about 2055 before the downtown is redone.
We couldn't agree more. We're doing it in the West End, when the actual area was tore up for gigantic public housing complexes in the late 30's-early 40's. Then I-75, then 6th st...It's hard to think about, considering how far we set ourselves back. The city would have probably still paved over the old streetcar system, but it would have been restored in the 70's with federal dollars. What's most frustrating is, Baltimore managed to have a city highway without destroying downtown like Cincinnati did. Baltimore.
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Old 01-09-2009, 10:38 AM
 
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So basically the owner is trying to demolish because he knows the houses will have ZERO rehab value once Citylink moves in? Right? Probably because at least an empty lot would have value as potential industrial property, even next to a homeless center. But no one wants to live next to a shelter.

Which means that even if the city prevents demolition, the buildings will probably decay until they fall down anyway, right?

(I'm not trying to argue for demolition, but I'm just being pessimistic about the potential of preservation that I think should happen, but won't)
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartwell Girl View Post
The demo HAS BEEN objected from the Citys Historic Conservation group. Demo is on hold at this time.
Well, there you go ... Thanks HG.

The front windows on my pad can't even be touched without going through major hoops ... a demolition? That's a whole different ball game.

... but I will say this: too much, way too much has been lost due to demos.
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,391,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe 4520832257 View Post
So basically the owner is trying to demolish because he knows the houses will have ZERO rehab value once Citylink moves in? Right? Probably because at least an empty lot would have value as potential industrial property, even next to a homeless center. But no one wants to live next to a shelter.

Which means that even if the city prevents demolition, the buildings will probably decay until they fall down anyway, right?

(I'm not trying to argue for demolition, but I'm just being pessimistic about the potential of preservation that I think should happen, but won't)
Joe since I posted on my blog Ive recieved over 250 emails from both in and outside of Cincinnati, A few have been from local realtors with clients and some have been from individual people who are interested in restoring them. I work in cities all the time where there are million dollar home across the street from a homeless shelter.

The problem is that people here simply "assume" there is no value because of city link. Frankly even if city link gets off the ground and the city would actually push historic restoration, the very people city link wants to help wont live anywhere near there. Maybe they will be in Oakley? Then they leave, beacsue grant monies dry up and some smart builder builds a luxury low rise condo project in its place. You have to start thinking forward and thats a big problem in Cincinnati, people "assume" things have to be the way they are and that doesnt have to be the case.
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Old 01-09-2009, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,391,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cincy-Rise View Post
Well, there you go ... Thanks HG.

The front windows on my pad can't even be touched without going through major hoops ... a demolition? That's a whole different ball game.

... but I will say this: too much, way too much has been lost due to demos.
You have to wonder since the city kept filing against him , he decided it was easier to tear it down himself rather than the city do it and take him to court over the bill?

It amazes me that Cincinnati lets the owner demo a house. In every city, some 1/2 1/4 the size of Cincinnati, demolition MUST be done by a liscened demolition contractor who must have insurance and bond posted with the city,

There is one near our House Restoration that a guy has been demoing by hand for over 2 months, never mind its not secure and any kid could fall into the basement. Its probably going to take some kid falling in some 1/2 demoed house or one falling against a neighbors house and killing someone for the city to understand, that most homeowners lack the skills or equipment to demo a house and certainly dont usally have any insurance. In fact the city by allowing it is opening themselves up to civil liabaility. Part of why the system is broken!
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Old 01-09-2009, 06:43 PM
 
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Everyone knows that City-Link is in the West End, not OTR -right?
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Old 01-10-2009, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Hartwell--IN THE City of Cincinnati
1,055 posts, read 3,571,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cincy-Rise View Post
Everyone knows that City-Link is in the West End, not OTR -right?
Yes. And these four buildings are directly across the street (to the south) of the proposed City Link site.
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