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Old 01-27-2009, 05:26 PM
 
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Hi all. I'm moving to Cincinnati this spring, and have found a beautiful house in Hyde Park. However, given that this is a more urban environment I'm wondering about how many families with young children actually live there. I've been in the suburbs for so long with my three year old daughter, that although I'm excited about the possibility of moving back to a more urban lifestyle, but nervous about whether there are other children around and the same type of sports and community activities that there are for school age children in the suburbs.

I'm rambling, but I'd appreciate any advice. Thanks.
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Old 01-27-2009, 07:52 PM
 
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It's not going to be the same as the far suburbs, where everyone has kids. However there are still plenty. I'm sure it doesn't hurt that Hyde Park is in a really good elementary school district.

I'm in Hyde Park, and there are 5 toddlers within a couple houses of me, so there are certainly young kids around! Tons of elementary and middle school aged kids are always walking by my house (because they go to school at St. Mary's). I don't see too many high school aged kids though.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Joe 4520832257 View Post
I'm in Hyde Park, and there are 5 toddlers within a couple houses of me, so there are certainly young kids around! Tons of elementary and middle school aged kids are always walking by my house (because they go to school at St. Mary's). I don't see too many high school aged kids though.
It is probably because there are no high schools in the immediate vacinity of Hyde Park.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:47 PM
 
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Whaaaa??? ... I'd say 3 out of 5 households have kids in HP.

Here are the 6 schools in the immediate vicinity: DonorDrive™ - Hyde Park Neighborhood Council - Area Schools
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Old 01-29-2009, 11:38 AM
 
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Thanks. This makes me feel better. Also, are there local kids sports leagues for younger kids as opposed to those in high school? We just want to make sure that we're not cheating our child out of opportunities that may be available in the suburbs by wanting to live in a more urban environment.
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Old 01-29-2009, 04:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Choyclm View Post
Thanks. This makes me feel better. Also, are there local kids sports leagues for younger kids as opposed to those in high school? We just want to make sure that we're not cheating our child out of opportunities that may be available in the suburbs by wanting to live in a more urban environment.
I applaud your efforts in deciding to raise a child in a more environment!

However, HP isn't very 'urban" per sť at least it's not viewed that way by city residents, I'd say.

We recently found out that my wife is pregnant and we live near OTR and Downtown. We want to raise our family right here in the city.
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Old 01-30-2009, 08:25 AM
 
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By national standards, I think it's fair to call a place urban if it's around 10 dwelling units per acre, with sidewalks, a street grid, and access to mixed uses. So parts of Hyde Park (and most areas within Cincinnati city limits) can reasonably be called urban.

Traditionally, these types of areas were called streetcar suburbs, but in recent decades (especially with the advent of the new urbanism) these neighborhoods tend to be accepted as one type of "urban" land use patterns.

I agree, compared to places like Over-the-Rhine, the rest of Cincinnati seems downright suburban. Then again, so does practically anywhere since OTR is such a rich example of urban land use patterns. But someone from another region of the country - like the sunbelt for example - is probably going to consider everything within Cincy city limits to be very urban.
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Old 01-30-2009, 08:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
It is probably because there are no high schools in the immediate vacinity of Hyde Park.
I don't know about that. Withrow is right in the middle of Hyde Park. Purcell is less than 1000 yards. I'm sure there are more that would qualify as immediate vicinity.

Edit: add Summit.
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Old 01-30-2009, 09:04 AM
 
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Originally Posted by wilson1010 View Post
I don't know about that. Withrow is right in the middle of Hyde Park. Purcell is less than 1000 yards. I'm sure there are more that would qualify as immediate vicinity.

Edit: add Summit.
That is an awfully expansive view of Hyde Park. Withrow is 1.5 miles from Hyde Park Square and Purcell-Marian is 4-5 miles away. Of course, I have heard people from the eatern portion of Norwood and the other side of Oakley Square claim that they too live in Hyde Park.

Sorry, I don't buy it.
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Old 01-30-2009, 10:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
That is an awfully expansive view of Hyde Park. Withrow is 1.5 miles from Hyde Park Square and Purcell-Marian is 4-5 miles away. Of course, I have heard people from the eatern portion of Norwood and the other side of Oakley Square claim that they too live in Hyde Park.

Sorry, I don't buy it.
You're from out of town or Mars.

Withrow is exactly in Hyde Park. Its not 1.5 miles from the square, its 4 tenths of a mile. Its two miles from Oakley, a mile and a half from Walnut Hills, two miles from Norwood, 5 blocks from Hyde Park Square. It has a 45208 zip code. Having lived in Hyde Park for 50 years and having attended Withrow gives me some insight into the matter.

Last edited by Wilson513; 01-30-2009 at 10:47 AM..
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