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Old 02-10-2009, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Deer Park, OH
246 posts, read 881,867 times
Reputation: 109

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I wish I could take credit for this, but I someone sent this to me and I had to pass it on. Apologies to anyone who's already seen it (as well as to the producers of the endless "I Love the . . . " series on VH1).

Hope you enjoy. Can anyone add to the list?

-----------------

Q102: Every eight-year-old in the city listened to Q102 to hear the latest pop hits. One of their DJs as a publicity stunt once played "The Stroke" by Billy Squier for six hours straight, claiming to have locked himself in the DJ booth while the station managers tried to break down the door to stop him. Being the literal-minded eight-year-old I was, I believed all of this, and it was high drama to me. I was quite irritable when my parents told me it was all a set-up. A radio station, lying to me? Never! Of course it would get worse...(see below)

Ira Joe Fisher: Weatherman on one of the local channels (Channel 12, maybe?) He was a star because he could write backwards! As I recall he was also the local host of "PM Magazine."

The Heart Mart: A local thrift store. I believe they had (and still have) several locations around town, but the one in Madisonville was the most prominent in my life, because one of the most cutting insults you could make against someone at Anderson Place School was "Yo' mama buys yo' clothes at the Heart Mart!" The rhyming name made the insult all the more strong. Ouch!

The Bengals didn't suck: They got those funky new helmets with the stripes and suddenly they were good. Cris Collinsworth was actually considered a local sex symbol. They played a playoff game when it was 40 below out, and went to the Super Bowl. They wound up losing to the 49ers. Several years later, at the end of the 1980s, they went to the Super Bowl again, and lost to the 49ers again. But 1982 was the first and last time I actually cared about football, so I remember that one.

Markets International: A fairly small shopping mall in the Tri-County area; it was back behind where Half Price Books is now. Its big attraction was that it was supposed to be an upscale multicultural mall. I seem to recall that they had some Findlay Market-style meat vendors there too. All I really remember about it was the big food court in the middle and that there was a bookstore there. Dead by the latter part of the decade, they had the same idea as that giant ethno-complex Jungle Jim is currently constructing in Fairfield, but twenty years too soon.

ON-TV: The suburbs were wired for cable long before the city was, so in the interim, this was all we could get. Channel 64 was a regular channel during the day, but at night they became ON-TV. You had to have a special aerial and converter box. They mostly played movies, although I remember seeing my first rock video (ironically, it was the same video which was the first ever played on MTV, "Video Killed the Radio Star") on ON-TV. In the fall of '82, Warner Cable finally made it to our neighborhood, and the half-assed semi-cable of ON-TV was relegated to the dustbin of history.

The Union Terminal Mall: Another conversion gone wrong that was exciting for a brief period -- turn the city's deserted Art Deco train station into an urban shopping mall. I remember it as very labyrinthine compared to regular malls. Being the early 1980s, they had one of those iron-on t-shirt stores there. I also had one of my greatest victories of the 1980s there, getting the high score on Centipede in the video arcade. By the mid-80s, only Loehmann's struggled to hang on in the concourse.

The Magic Touch: When we first got cable (and for several years thereafter) we had those bulky QUBE boxes instead of remotes. The big thing with the QUBE boxes was that they were supposed to usher in a new era of interactive television, revolutionize community participation, etc. "The Magic Touch" was as interactive as it ever got. It was an interactive quiz show hosted by the smarmy, toupeed Bill Myers. You could play along from home and potentially win really crappy prizes like cheap Radio Shack answering machines. "The Magic Touch" was my first introduction to the concept of watching TV ironically.

Kenwood Plaza morphs into Kenwood Towne Centre: If you were a teenage girl in Cincinnati, this was probably the single most important thing that happened in the 1980s. The formerly windswept strip mall was transformed into a giant glittering marble palace of commerce. No longer did teenage mallrats have to content themselves with the paltry two little wings of Kenwood Mall (with the best mall fountain in the city in the middle, I must say), the Towne Centre had two whole floors and a food court! It felt like a mall in a real city.

Jeckles: I suppose this place should be saved for "I Love the 70s," because it did always have that late-70s fern bar aesthetic, but in the mid-80s, before we were old enough to drive or have good taste, my friends and I loved this place. It felt like a real grown-up restaurant, and it wasn't a chain or anything. So any time someone had a birthday or other large celebration in junior high, we went to Jeckles and felt like we were sophisticated young adults. I actually went back there in the mid-90s once, because nothing else was open Monday night. The food wasn't very good and overall it was a sad place. Soon thereafter it was bulldozed to make room for yet another expansion of the Hyde Park Kroger.

Swifton Mall morphs into Swifton Commons: It was an open-air mall long before Rookwood came along. Only the food court was indoors. For about ten minutes, it was cool to hang out here, but it quickly was subsumed by the Kenwood monster that ate everything in its path. By the end of the 1980s, it was in terminal decline.

The Skywalk: You could walk all the way from Shillito's on Seventh to McAlpin's on Fourth without being on ground level! It had stores and restaurants on it, and we were led to believe that it was one of those things that made Cincinnati cool and special. Then all the department stores downtown started closing, and large swaths of Skywalk became dangerous, deserted, dead-ends. Now it's almost all been torn down, and is often fingered as a giant error of urban planning which went a long way towards ruining street life in downtown Cincinnati. But I miss the old Skywalk of its late '70s - mid '80s heyday.

97X: The radio station all the cool people listened to once they outgrew Q102. We could look down our indie-snob noses at people who listened to WEBN. They had virtually no signal at this time, so you could only listen unaided in the western part of the county (the West Side -- cooler than the East Side???). To listen at home, you had to get a cable hookup to your stereo, and then you could only listen in one room of the house. It was very cool and kind of samizdat-ish, at least by mid-1980s Midwestern standards. By the end of the 1980s, the indie snobs sniffed at 97X and claimed to only listen to "Nightwaves" on WVXU.

Plummet Mall: This wasn't a real mall, it was a radio hoax. For several weeks, commercials ran on local radio stations for this new giant mall they were building in Northern Kentucky, which would be distinguished by being underground. To my everlasting shame, I fell for the hoax and was really excited about the mall.

Classical Music on WEBN: It seems unbelievable in these focus-grouped ClearChannelUberAlles days, but up through the 1980s, WEBN had a Sunday morning classical music show, one of those public service broadcasts to give the metalheads a little taste of high culture. What's even more amazing is that this is actually where I first started liking classical music in my mid-teens. So it worked! One of those quirks of local radio that would never get past head office today.

Jerry and Normer: Before he was JERRY SPRINGER, he was just our Jerry, our ex-mayor, hey-did-you-hear-he-paid-a-hooker-with-a-check, turned news anchor. Paired with Norma Rashid on Channel Five, they were the news team of the 1980s. Jerry's nightly commentaries gave just the right self-righteous edge to whatever was the controversy of the day. His talk show actually got its start on Channel Five, too, debuting at the start of the '90s as an earnest, mannered Donohue-clone. Please just come back to Channel Five, Jerry...All is forgiven!

The Cove: I realize this Ludlow Ave. coffeehouse/bar both predated and (slightly) outlasted the 1980s, but I first discovered it in the late 1980s. This was in the pre-Starbucks days, when coffeehouses still had something of a legitimate bohemian edge. I remember going there for the first time and also eating tabouli for the first time one night when I was fifteen. I felt so sophisticated and urban and cool. They also had one waitress -- we always referred to her as the "Hungarian waitress," although I have no clue if that was her actual national origin -- who would serve alcohol to sixteen-year-olds provided the owner wasn't on the premises at the time.
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Old 02-10-2009, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,152 posts, read 57,274,608 times
Reputation: 52008
What about Short Vine -- In the mid-80s, it was the place to go any night of the week. There was always something fun going on, and fun folks everywhere. Dollar Bill's, InCahoots, Top Cats and a whole bunch o' places I can't remember the names to (because I drank too much at Dollar Bill's ...). I also gave Bogart's a good deal of my $175 weekly salary in those days. And then on Saturday afternoons, all hung over, I'd return to shop at Scentiments and the Cupboard.
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Old 02-10-2009, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Pendleton County, KY
241 posts, read 1,176,235 times
Reputation: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
What about Short Vine -- In the mid-80s, it was the place to go any night of the week. There was always something fun going on, and fun folks everywhere. Dollar Bill's, InCahoots, Top Cats and a whole bunch o' places I can't remember the names to (because I drank too much at Dollar Bill's ...). I also gave Bogart's a good deal of my $175 weekly salary in those days. And then on Saturday afternoons, all hung over, I'd return to shop at Scentiments and the Cupboard.
I remember visiting Clifton a lot in the mid 1980s to go "clubbing." I had just turned 19, which was the legal beer-drinking age at the time. Burgundy's and Cooter's were the big party clubs (aka - meat markets) in those days. Ah, memories.
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Old 02-10-2009, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Hartwell--IN THE City of Cincinnati
1,055 posts, read 3,560,693 times
Reputation: 904
Quote:
Originally Posted by RuralGuy View Post
I remember visiting Clifton a lot in the mid 1980s to go "clubbing." I had just turned 19, which was the legal beer-drinking age at the time. Burgundy's and Cooter's were the big party clubs (aka - meat markets) in those days. Ah, memories.
WoW! That has me lol.
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:51 AM
 
Location: East Walnut Hills
189 posts, read 600,745 times
Reputation: 154
Default Reply~circa late 1970's

Quote:
Originally Posted by tntnb View Post
I wish I could take credit for this, but I someone sent this to me and I had to pass it on. Apologies to anyone who's already seen it (as well as to the producers of the endless "I Love the . . . " series on VH1).

Hope you enjoy. Can anyone add to the list?

-----------------

Q102: Every eight-year-old in the city listened to Q102 to hear the latest pop hits. One of their DJs as a publicity stunt once played "The Stroke" by Billy Squier for six hours straight, claiming to have locked himself in the DJ booth while the station managers tried to break down the door to stop him. Being the literal-minded eight-year-old I was, I believed all of this, and it was high drama to me. I was quite irritable when my parents told me it was all a set-up. A radio station, lying to me? Never! Of course it would get worse...(see below)

Ira Joe Fisher: Weatherman on one of the local channels (Channel 12, maybe?) He was a star because he could write backwards! As I recall he was also the local host of "PM Magazine."

The Bengals didn't suck: They got those funky new helmets with the stripes and suddenly they were good. Cris Collinsworth was actually considered a local sex symbol. They played a playoff game when it was 40 below out, and went to the Super Bowl. They wound up losing to the 49ers. Several years later, at the end of the 1980s, they went to the Super Bowl again, and lost to the 49ers again. But 1982 was the first and last time I actually cared about football, so I remember that one.

Kenwood Plaza morphs into Kenwood Towne Centre: If you were a teenage girl in Cincinnati, this was probably the single most important thing that happened in the 1980s. The formerly windswept strip mall was transformed into a giant glittering marble palace of commerce. No longer did teenage mallrats have to content themselves with the paltry two little wings of Kenwood Mall (with the best mall fountain in the city in the middle, I must say), the Towne Centre had two whole floors and a food court! It felt like a mall in a real city.

Jeckles: I suppose this place should be saved for "I Love the 70s," because it did always have that late-70s fern bar aesthetic, but in the mid-80s, before we were old enough to drive or have good taste, my friends and I loved this place. It felt like a real grown-up restaurant, and it wasn't a chain or anything. So any time someone had a birthday or other large celebration in junior high, we went to Jeckles and felt like we were sophisticated young adults. I actually went back there in the mid-90s once, because nothing else was open Monday night. The food wasn't very good and overall it was a sad place. Soon thereafter it was bulldozed to make room for yet another expansion of the Hyde Park Kroger.

Swifton Mall morphs into Swifton Commons: It was an open-air mall long before Rookwood came along. Only the food court was indoors. For about ten minutes, it was cool to hang out here, but it quickly was subsumed by the Kenwood monster that ate everything in its path. By the end of the 1980s, it was in terminal decline.

The Skywalk: You could walk all the way from Shillito's on Seventh to McAlpin's on Fourth without being on ground level! It had stores and restaurants on it, and we were led to believe that it was one of those things that made Cincinnati cool and special. Then all the department stores downtown started closing, and large swaths of Skywalk became dangerous, deserted, dead-ends. Now it's almost all been torn down, and is often fingered as a giant error of urban planning which went a long way towards ruining street life in downtown Cincinnati. But I miss the old Skywalk of its late '70s - mid '80s heyday.

97X: The radio station all the cool people listened to once they outgrew Q102. We could look down our indie-snob noses at people who listened to WEBN. They had virtually no signal at this time, so you could only listen unaided in the western part of the county (the West Side -- cooler than the East Side???). To listen at home, you had to get a cable hookup to your stereo, and then you could only listen in one room of the house. It was very cool and kind of samizdat-ish, at least by mid-1980s Midwestern standards. By the end of the 1980s, the indie snobs sniffed at 97X and claimed to only listen to "Nightwaves" on WVXU.

Classical Music on WEBN: It seems unbelievable in these focus-grouped ClearChannelUberAlles days, but up through the 1980s, WEBN had a Sunday morning classical music show, one of those public service broadcasts to give the metalheads a little taste of high culture. What's even more amazing is that this is actually where I first started liking classical music in my mid-teens. So it worked! One of those quirks of local radio that would never get past head office today.

Jerry and Normer: Before he was JERRY SPRINGER, he was just our Jerry, our ex-mayor, hey-did-you-hear-he-paid-a-hooker-with-a-check, turned news anchor. Paired with Norma Rashid on Channel Five, they were the news team of the 1980s. Jerry's nightly commentaries gave just the right self-righteous edge to whatever was the controversy of the day. His talk show actually got its start on Channel Five, too, debuting at the start of the '90s as an earnest, mannered Donohue-clone. Please just come back to Channel Five, Jerry...All is forgiven!

Wow!! Great stuff!!! But, I was just a little older than you.

In the late 1970's ~~

Q102 was for babies. I listened to WEBN~album-oriented rock. Robin Wood was one of the DJ's, and her father, Frank Wood, owned the station when it changed from "all classical music" to album-oriented rock!! For many years after they changed the format, classical music would be played on Sunday mornings, kinda a tribute to the former format, or maybe like a church service {on Sunday morning~classical music~church service~that is the way I viewed it, but ...classical music...good education}.

Jerry Springer was the mayor of Cincinnati. He payed for a prostitute, with a check, in Covington, KY. Bad move. But, he made a career out of it. Good for him. And, as for Norma, she got into some trouble. That is her business. Too bad Norma {Normer} wasn't Jerry!!! Jerry!!! Jerry!!

The Skywalk used to be great fun!! There used to be a movie theater {The Skywalk}, that showed all of the new movies, and you could walk to a few bars and restaurants from the theater, after you watched the show, on the skywalk, to get some food and drink.

There was a movie theatre on Race Street, ...what was it? It is now the Shakespeare Theatre? It was an artsy~fartsy movie theatre.

Swifton mall,would be Swifton Shopping Center, not Swifton Mall. It was never a mall. It was a shopping center.

You mentioned Jeckle's. Jeckle's was owned by the same people who owned the Busy Bee on Ludlow Avenue in Clifton. Was that Elliot Jablonsky?

And, the Bengals didn't suck, and the Reds were still trying to hold their own. In the late 1970's. Sports teams in Cincy were , at the very least, respectable.

Last edited by soozycue520; 02-11-2009 at 01:10 AM..
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Old 02-11-2009, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,152 posts, read 57,274,608 times
Reputation: 52008
I loved the Skywalk -- the movie theater, Scully's bar, a couple of neat restaurants -- and even up until I moved away four years ago, I used it every day the weather was nasty to walk from the bus stop at Government Square to my office in the Textile Building at Fourth and Elm. I had to walk only a half block outdoors -- I still don't understand why the Skywalk was so underused.

And the bars on Second Street -- Sleep Out Louie's, Caddy's, January's (??), and another place near the railroad overpass just called the Second Street Tavern or something like that. Great fun. Mt. Adams had just turned into a hot spot back then as well.

Ya think I went to too many bars in those days?
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Old 02-11-2009, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Deer Park, OH
246 posts, read 881,867 times
Reputation: 109
Default Moviola/The Movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by soozycue520 View Post
There was a movie theatre on Race Street, ...what was it? It is now the Shakespeare Theatre? It was an artsy~fartsy movie theatre.
It was originally called Moviola, yes? Later known as The Movies. I saw many a flick there -- I fondly recall the Animation Festivals they'd often have. You could sign up to receive their always-rotating schedule in the mail, and it was always a pleasure to read through it and highlight the ones you wanted to see.

There was a nice little cafe nextdoor that served the greatest pie . . . Mullane's, I think it was called . . . .

I took my wife on our first date to The Movies -- to see "Sid and Nancy." When she didn't go running away screaming after that, I knew I had a keeper!
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Old 02-11-2009, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Deer Park, OH
246 posts, read 881,867 times
Reputation: 109
Default The Pit

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
And the bars on Second Street -- Sleep Out Louie's, Caddy's, January's (??), and another place near the railroad overpass just called the Second Street Tavern or something like that. Great fun. Mt. Adams had just turned into a hot spot back then as well.
There was a disco downtown called Tomorrow's. But at some point during the 80s, they'd turn it into a "punk rock" venue called The Pit once a week. I wonder if anyone here ever visited . . . .

There was a local band called The Dents that played there a lot.
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Old 02-11-2009, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,152 posts, read 57,274,608 times
Reputation: 52008
The only place I ever went downtown was the Metro, in the alley between Sixth and Seventh, and Walnut and Vine. On Wednesday nights they had "Talent Night," which consisted of a series of drag queens lip synching Culture Club songs. But on the weekends they had live bands downstairs and a dance club upstairs.

Anyone frequent the Jockey Club in Newport? What was the owner's name ... Shorty? The graffiti in the women's rest room were amazing ... Or what about Rock 'n' Bowl nights at Glenn Schmidt's bowling alley in Newport? That was the first time I saw the Afghan Whigs; all I remember is that they were loud. LOL That must have been the later 80s.
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Old 02-11-2009, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Deer Park, OH
246 posts, read 881,867 times
Reputation: 109
Default Jockey Club

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
The only place I ever went downtown was the Metro, in the alley between Sixth and Seventh, and Walnut and Vine. On Wednesday nights they had "Talent Night," which consisted of a series of drag queens lip synching Culture Club songs. But on the weekends they had live bands downstairs and a dance club upstairs.

Anyone frequent the Jockey Club in Newport? What was the owner's name ... Shorty? The graffiti in the women's rest room were amazing ... Or what about Rock 'n' Bowl nights at Glenn Schmidt's bowling alley in Newport? That was the first time I saw the Afghan Whigs; all I remember is that they were loud. LOL That must have been the later 80s.
Wow, I had forgotten all about The Metro. Yeah, I went there a few times.

Now the Jockey Club, I hung out there a lot in the 80s. One of my most enduring memories is a Love Tractor concert where I spent about half the time watching the band and the other half warily eyeing the raw sewage that was inexplicably pouring down one of the walls . . . .

I wonder if we ever slam-danced together at the JC, Ohiogirl?

Jockey Club memories here:

jockeyclub (http://home.fuse.net/hohorecords/jockeyclub.htm - broken link)
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