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Old 08-03-2013, 05:11 PM
 
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does anybody remember a rest... name big al downtown on 5th street? near the alaska fur company
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Old 08-09-2013, 06:38 PM
 
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Could you possibly mean Pigall's on 4th?
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Old 08-11-2013, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
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LOL...I seriously doubt it.
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:22 AM
 
528 posts, read 576,412 times
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We never had a car growing up so we took the bus every where. One of my fondest memories was my dad buying a Sunday Pass for him my brother and myself and riding all over town all day. That is how we learned our way around the city. One week we would ride through Price Hill, Westwood and Covedale. Another week we would head east to Coney Island or Lunken Airport. During the summer we would head down to Crosley Field and catch a Reds game. The Art Museum, The Natural History Museum, Lunken Playfield, Union Terminal, Dixie Terminal, Fountain Square (the original one), Pebbles Corner, Eden Park (I remember the construction of the Mirror Lake and the reservoir under it), Krohn Conservatory and Mt. Adams were all destinations.

There was no Queen City Metro back then, it was The Cincinnati Transit. Most of the motor buses and electric trolly buses were orange on the bottom (that's why the bus stops were orange) and cream colored on the top. In 1959 or 1960 that changed when the new air conditioned GM Dreamliners hit the streets decked out in a new two tone blue livery. Anyone else remember the TV ads that ran showing the new buses that were about to hit the streets. I do, they ran them a lot on the Paul Dixon Show. We would take the #8 or #27 from our house to downtown's Goverment Square and the adventure would begin. It was a special treat to go to the Dixie Terminal and catch one of the Green Line buses and head across the river via the Suspension Bridge.

Looking back it was a way for my father who worked a lot of hours in one of the cities machine tool factories to relax and spend some quality time with his boys. Equally important it gave my mother a much needed break from twin boys that she had to entertain 6 days a week.

Last edited by xjken; 08-14-2013 at 08:32 AM..
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Old 08-23-2013, 09:23 PM
 
205 posts, read 805,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xjken View Post
We never had a car growing up so we took the bus every where. One of my fondest memories was my dad buying a Sunday Pass for him my brother and myself and riding all over town all day. That is how we learned our way around the city. One week we would ride through Price Hill, Westwood and Covedale. Another week we would head east to Coney Island or Lunken Airport. During the summer we would head down to Crosley Field and catch a Reds game. The Art Museum, The Natural History Museum, Lunken Playfield, Union Terminal, Dixie Terminal, Fountain Square (the original one), Pebbles Corner, Eden Park (I remember the construction of the Mirror Lake and the reservoir under it), Krohn Conservatory and Mt. Adams were all destinations.

There was no Queen City Metro back then, it was The Cincinnati Transit. Most of the motor buses and electric trolly buses were orange on the bottom (that's why the bus stops were orange) and cream colored on the top. In 1959 or 1960 that changed when the new air conditioned GM Dreamliners hit the streets decked out in a new two tone blue livery. Anyone else remember the TV ads that ran showing the new buses that were about to hit the streets. I do, they ran them a lot on the Paul Dixon Show. We would take the #8 or #27 from our house to downtown's Goverment Square and the adventure would begin. It was a special treat to go to the Dixie Terminal and catch one of the Green Line buses and head across the river via the Suspension Bridge.

Looking back it was a way for my father who worked a lot of hours in one of the cities machine tool factories to relax and spend some quality time with his boys. Equally important it gave my mother a much needed break from twin boys that she had to entertain 6 days a week.
For some reason I decided (or maybe my dad did) at about age 12 that I really needed to attend the Y for swimming and physical fitness and all that stuff.

Problem was that the nearest Y at the time was on McMillan which was quite a way from Deer Park where we lived so I hopped the CTA bus up on Blue Ash Rd. with my little gym bag in hand.

After doing whatever I did at the historically rich but kind of smelly facility I walked back up McMillan toward Gilbert, stopped and ate two hot dogs at the Walgreen's (with mustard and relish) for lunch and hopped another bus back home.

Typically, while hoping that the buses would be Dreamliners, they usually were not.

LOL
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Old 08-24-2013, 01:50 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
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My lifelong aversion to shopping can be traced back to those weekday mornings from time to time when Dad - preparing to leave for work in THE family car - would have announced to him "We'll be going to town today." In our house (at least in my presence) those words carried only one connotation. A deadly boring day for me lay ahead. Mom would dress for the occasion, never without white gloves, while I stomped + squawked + stewed.
During my childhood the branch of the 78 bus line to Tri-County didn't exist. That meant a walk of about a mile to pick up that route for trips downtown. But back then there existed the Ohio Bus Line, which followed Springfield Pike to Hamilton with its yellow-on-green buses. Mom would take my protesting self in hand and stroll to the corner of "the Pike" to catch one. Woe was me. The long trip down Vine St was OK because there was always something to see out the window. After we'd gotten to "town," though, masculine misery awaited: choking-thick perfumed air, thick carpeting, and boring fashion magazines at Gidding's..."I'd like to try this one on next" at Pogue's...an un-filling lunch at the Women's Exchange. Eventually - maybe after I was deputized to carry some bags/boxes - we'd be back on the Ohio Bus Line for the return to suburbia. It was never too soon!

In later years the 78 provided a lifeline for antsy adolescents who either hadn't gotten their driver's licenses yet or didn't have wheels. Boredom could be easily alleviated by going downtown, where during the '70s there was plenty for kids to enjoy. Movies at the Skywalk Cinema I & II! Ben's Department Store on Central Ave for the very latest and coolest sneakers! Other clothing merchants like Dino's, Just Any Old Thing, and Mike Trotta - where, lacking the serious money involved, you could still get duded up to goof around for a few minutes. [(The clerks always held their tongues 'cause they knew these guys might reappear with their parents later to make purchases.) To this day I've kept two suits from Dino's, with their wide-lapel jackets, though lawd knows I probably outgrew them before the 20th Century ended. Shirts bought from those three stores have long since fallen apart and been thrown away.] And there were few places better for practicing the age-old art of hanging out, whether that be on the Skywalk or on Fountain Square or just bopping up and down the street.

You could, of course, also hop off/on the 78 in Corryville along what by then had become "Short Vine," to mingle with throngs of UC students and hope to pass as one. When Lady Luck smiled you could be served beer at one of the numerous purveyors of same, typically by a gal or guy not much over 21 themselves. And plenty of merchants offering the "threads" of the moment were ready for your bucks - that is, the ones you weren't holding to drop at The Cupboard.

Hats off to "xjken" for punching my bus-memory button!
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Old 08-25-2013, 03:55 PM
 
205 posts, read 805,167 times
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Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Actually, it was at 90 7th Street East (between Main and Bowen).

I thought that they still had stage shows into the early seventies before it was raised in 1976.

The Albee served as the home of the CSO during the renovation of the Music Hall in the early 1970s.
I thought it was a block West of there but I guess you're right.

The Shubert was the big theater and the Cox was the little one, right?
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Old 08-25-2013, 04:44 PM
 
1,828 posts, read 2,800,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckeyenative01 View Post
Nobody it seems, outside Greater Cincinnati, knows what a "pony keg" is. Fun list.

In Lima, Ohio they do. just saying.
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Old 08-27-2013, 10:39 AM
 
5,310 posts, read 6,608,894 times
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Originally Posted by 23145tp View Post
I use to have a summer job washing cars at Jake Sweeney Pontiac at Galbreath and Vine in Hartwell

Jake the snake !
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Old 08-28-2013, 06:57 PM
 
Location: OH
688 posts, read 862,989 times
Reputation: 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckeyenative01 View Post
Nobody it seems, outside Greater Cincinnati, knows what a "pony keg" is. Fun list.
I've heard the term used elsewhere in Ohio but most likely from SW Ohio transplants. The bigger question is if those outside Cincy would know what a King Kwik is?

One of my favorite Cincinnati memories was receiving a birthday card in the mail from Johnny's Toys and opening it to find a key to Johnny's Castle where kids could unlock the door and go in to pick out a toy. Great marketing in hindsight. What parent isn't going to buy their kid a toy around their birthday?
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