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Old 04-19-2010, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,732,394 times
Reputation: 2058

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My wife and I are moving back to Cincinnati in a month. We will spend the next six months looking at houses. We're moving downtown to a nice apartment in the meantime.

I am considering evaluating our neighborhood choice by architecture rather than by real estate prices and equity and all of that. If architecture were the only factor, which neighborhood is best, given the following conditions:

- Within 15 minutes (car, driving) of downtown
- Neighborhood where houses have some type of yard (eg 40 x 100 lots)

I would consider, for example, liberty hill, to fail to meet these criteria because generally speaking those houses have 0' setbacks and no yards.

I thought this might be an interesting discussion.
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Old 04-19-2010, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,374,610 times
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I will let the other respondents answer your question, as I am not qualified. Had to note your 40' by 100' lot though. Mine is 110' by 350', which is one of the reasons my wife refuses to move. But this is great, everyone to their own likes and desires.
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,388,835 times
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Architecturally, you will find comparable architecture by the same architects, Samuel Hannaford for example built all over Cincinnati.

It also depend on the style of architecture, Hands down the best 'high victorian" area is Dayton street in Cincinnati. but that would not meet the "lot criteria".

I would say 3 areas "architecturally speaking" fit the bill. North Avondale, Walnut hills and Westwood.

I leave out areas like Hyde Park and Indian Hills because they have too many teardown "mcmansions" now and the overall feel of the area has in my opinion been compromised. Parts of Columbia Tusculum "might' fit the bill.

Despite what many on this board will say Westwood would be my choice because it has the best value for the dollar, good schools and they have strong neighorhood groups who care and they are agressively pushing the city on substandard housing along harrison. There are incredible houses off Harrison that can be bought right and have simply incredible detail.

Having said all the above, there are a lot of small "pocket neighborhoods' up in the hills with incredible houses that most people on thios board have no clue exist.

Get a realtor who knows Cincinnati, ignor 90 percent of what you read on this board (especially the east vs west drivel) and you will find a house that "speaks' to you. that is what we did and I couldn't be happier!
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Blue Ash, Ohio (Cincinnati)
2,786 posts, read 5,506,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
Architecturally, you will find comparable architecture by the same architects, Samuel Hannaford for example built all over Cincinnati.

It also depend on the style of architecture, Hands down the best 'high victorian" area is Dayton street in Cincinnati. but that would not meet the "lot criteria".

I would say 3 areas "architecturally speaking" fit the bill. North Avondale, Walnut hills and Westwood.

I leave out areas like Hyde Park and Indian Hills because they have too many teardown "mcmansions" now and the overall feel of the area has in my opinion been compromised. Parts of Columbia Tusculum "might' fit the bill.

Despite what many on this board will say Westwood would be my choice because it has the best value for the dollar, good schools and they have strong neighorhood groups who care and they are agressively pushing the city on substandard housing along harrison. There are incredible houses off Harrison that can be bought right and have simply incredible detail.

Having said all the above, there are a lot of small "pocket neighborhoods' up in the hills with incredible houses that most people on thios board have no clue exist.

Get a realtor who knows Cincinnati, ignor 90 percent of what you read on this board (especially the east vs west drivel) and you will find a house that "speaks' to you. that is what we did and I couldn't be happier!
This poster knows what he is talking about.
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,732,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I will let the other respondents answer your question, as I am not qualified. Had to note your 40' by 100' lot though. Mine is 110' by 350', which is one of the reasons my wife refuses to move. But this is great, everyone to their own likes and desires.
I mention the lot size as perhaps a minimum, although not necessarily depending on the configuration. usually when you get into 25x50 or even 25x100 you're talking townhouse or something built at the lot lines. right now i am on a 37.5 x 100 lot and it is good enough for a house and a yard with a grill and picnic table and small garden. 110' x 350' is a nice size lot too, not so big you don't know your neighbors but still big enough that you have lots of space. definitely bigger than what you'll find in the city! like you say, we all like what we like and i think the cinci metro area offers something for most tastes!
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,732,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
Architecturally, you will find comparable architecture by the same architects, Samuel Hannaford for example built all over Cincinnati.

It also depend on the style of architecture.....
Thank you for this and the PM reply! What a fantastic amount of quality info. I hope other people find this post and reply as useful as I have.
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Old 04-20-2010, 06:18 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,955,279 times
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Restorationconsultant didn't mention Clifton. I'd add that to the list, as well as narrowing Walnut Hills to East Walnut Hills. Be aware, although you didn't ask, that some of the most architecturally significant areas that fit your criterion of proximity to downtown can also be subject to quite a bit of property crime. The advice to find a good realtor who specializes in the areas you're interested in is solid.
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:15 AM
 
2,204 posts, read 5,847,086 times
Reputation: 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
Restorationconsultant didn't mention Clifton. I'd add that to the list, as well as narrowing Walnut Hills to East Walnut Hills. Be aware, although you didn't ask, that some of the most architecturally significant areas that fit your criterion of proximity to downtown can also be subject to quite a bit of property crime. The advice to find a good realtor who specializes in the areas you're interested in is solid.
I agree with these areas as well, but a Realtor cannot tell you if an area is dangerous or not. It's against the law, because it's completely subjective and based on perception. He will however direct you to sites.
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,732,394 times
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Crime is certainly something we will consider. We have fairly thick skin though. We lived for a year at the corner of Park and McMillan and rode the bus every day, waiting in areas often considered to be "war zones" We never had any trouble. That said, I don't want to live somewhere where I am not welcome, and I would feel that way in sections of walnut hills. We would probably also consider the area down by the park and nassau street although most of that is townhomes and multifamily.
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Old 04-20-2010, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
350 posts, read 718,117 times
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There are what you asked about in just about every Cincinnati neighborhood. I was in East Price Hill yesterday and was really impressed with Kreis Lane...In Roselawn, there is a particular neighborhood to the west of Reading Rd. where Losantiville dead ends into Reading.

I think the sleeper right now is College Hill and Upper Northside.
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