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Old 08-16-2010, 02:39 PM
 
2,756 posts, read 5,198,769 times
Reputation: 729

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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Yet and New Jersey is still loosing residents to crime filled Georgia.What does that say about New Jersey?Youve had at least 3 corrupt Governor face all kinds of charges in the past 20 years.

Lets take a look at New Jersey cities:
Patterson: Population :Est. 2008145,643−2.4%
In 1988, New Jersey became the first state in the nation to authorize its State Department of Education to take over local school districts that were failing according to an established monitoring process. In 1991, the city of Paterson became the second of the three troubled districts that had to cede control of its public schools to the state. The presumption was that improvement would follow.
To date, Paterson Public schools is still controlled by the State of New Jersey Department of Education. As such, Paterson Public Schools is managed by a state-appointed Superintendent and maintains a School Advisory Board that serves in an advisory capacity only



Trenton:Population Est. 2008[2]82,883−3.0%
In 2005, there were 31 homicides in Trenton, the largest number in a single year in the city's history, with 22 of the homicides believed to be gang related.[29] The city was named the 4th "Most Dangerous" in 2005 out of 129 cities with a population of 75,000 to 99,999 ranked nationwide.[30] In the 2006 survey, Trenton was ranked as the 14th most dangerous "city" overall out of 371 cities included nationwide in the 13th annual Morgan Quitno survey, and was again named as the fourth most dangerous "city" of 126 cities in the 75,00099,999 population range.[31] Homicides went down in 2006 to 20, but back up to 25 in 2007[32] As of October 9, 2008 there have been 18 homicides in Trenton

Newark:
1930442,337>6.7%
1940429,760>−2.8%
1950438,776>2.1%
1960405,220>−7.6%
1970381,930>−5.7%
1980329,248>−13.8%
1990275,221>−16.4%
2000273,546>−0.6%
Est. 2009278,154>1.7% (thanks to Cory)
In the 2007 rankings, now performed by CQ Press, Newark was the 20th most dangerous city in America of 378 cities surveyed. In 2008, Newark was ranked as the 24th most dangerous city, and as of 2009, has dropped out of the Top-25 altogether, standing at 29th.[22] In March, 2010, Newark enjoyed its first month without a homicide since 1966.Quite impressive.Amazing what great leadership can do.

Camden:
1950124,555>6.0%
1960117,159>−5.9%
1970102,551>−12.5%
198084,910>−17.2%
199087,492>3.0%
200079,318>−9.3%
Est. 200978,790>−0.7%

Although once a thriving center for manufacturing and industry, Camden is perhaps best known for its struggles with urban dysfunction. Three Camden mayors have been jailed for corruption, the most recent being Milton Milan in 2000.[8] Since 2005 the school system and police department have been operated by the State of New Jersey; the takeover will expire in 2012. In 2009, Camden had the highest crime rate in the U.S. with 2,333 violent crimes per 100,000 people while the national average was 455 per 100,000 [9] Camden public schools spend $17,000 per student per year yet only two thirds of the students graduate. Two out of every five residents are below the national poverty line.

If you like I can put Georgia's cities up for comparison,but as you may or may not know that none one can compare with those facts.

Not for anything, but our cities just don't have the face of our state as whole (the way ATL would for GA).

This means, when you bring up issues in the state, but only mention 3 cities with a population barely a million it really doesn't mean much.

Also, those numbers you list go back to the 30's which doesn't reflect modern gains/losses accurately (in that case your very own ATL experienced population loss that century)

Additionally, you mention Newark crime, but yet ATL is #18 on the most dangerous US cities list for '09. That's not a knock, but it must be pointed out if you wish to use crime as a reference.

Safest and Most Dangerous U.S. Cities, 2009 — Infoplease.com
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:03 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
2,646 posts, read 4,975,366 times
Reputation: 2263
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Yet and New Jersey is still loosing residents to crime filled Georgia.What does that say about New Jersey?
It says NJ is an expensive place to live.
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:05 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
5,256 posts, read 11,548,224 times
Reputation: 3072
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Yet and New Jersey is still loosing residents to crime filled Georgia.What does that say about New Jersey?Youve had at least 3 corrupt Governor face all kinds of charges in the past 20 years.

Lets take a look at New Jersey cities:
Patterson: Population :Est. 2008 145,643 −2.4%
In 1988, New Jersey became the first state in the nation to authorize its State Department of Education to take over local school districts that were failing according to an established monitoring process. In 1991, the city of Paterson became the second of the three troubled districts that had to cede control of its public schools to the state. The presumption was that improvement would follow.
To date, Paterson Public schools is still controlled by the State of New Jersey Department of Education. As such, Paterson Public Schools is managed by a state-appointed Superintendent and maintains a School Advisory Board that serves in an advisory capacity only



Trenton:Population Est. 2008[2] 82,883−3.0%
In 2005, there were 31 homicides in Trenton, the largest number in a single year in the city's history, with 22 of the homicides believed to be gang related.[29] The city was named the 4th "Most Dangerous" in 2005 out of 129 cities with a population of 75,000 to 99,999 ranked nationwide.[30] In the 2006 survey, Trenton was ranked as the 14th most dangerous "city" overall out of 371 cities included nationwide in the 13th annual Morgan Quitno survey, and was again named as the fourth most dangerous "city" of 126 cities in the 75,000–99,999 population range.[31] Homicides went down in 2006 to 20, but back up to 25 in 2007[32] As of October 9, 2008 there have been 18 homicides in Trenton

Newark:
1930 442,337> 6.7%
1940 429,760> −2.8%
1950 438,776> 2.1%
1960 405,220> −7.6%
1970 381,930> −5.7%
1980 329,248> −13.8%
1990 275,221> −16.4%
2000 273,546> −0.6%
Est. 2009 278,154 > 1.7% (thanks to Cory)
In the 2007 rankings, now performed by CQ Press, Newark was the 20th most dangerous city in America of 378 cities surveyed. In 2008, Newark was ranked as the 24th most dangerous city, and as of 2009, has dropped out of the Top-25 altogether, standing at 29th.[22] In March, 2010, Newark enjoyed its first month without a homicide since 1966.Quite impressive.Amazing what great leadership can do.

Camden:
1950 124,555> 6.0%
1960 117,159> −5.9%
1970 102,551> −12.5%
1980 84,910> −17.2%
1990 87,492> 3.0%
2000 79,318> −9.3%
Est. 2009 78,790> −0.7%

Although once a thriving center for manufacturing and industry, Camden is perhaps best known for its struggles with urban dysfunction. Three Camden mayors have been jailed for corruption, the most recent being Milton Milan in 2000.[8] Since 2005 the school system and police department have been operated by the State of New Jersey; the takeover will expire in 2012. In 2009, Camden had the highest crime rate in the U.S. with 2,333 violent crimes per 100,000 people while the national average was 455 per 100,000 [9] Camden public schools spend $17,000 per student per year yet only two thirds of the students graduate. Two out of every five residents are below the national poverty line.

If you like I can put Georgia's cities up for comparison,but as you may or may not know that none one can compare with those facts.
This post is riddled with ignorance.
~

First, NJ isn't losing any significant population.

Lets take a look at NJ's cities:
For one, Trenton and Camden shouldn't be named as if they're even in the states top 5. Try #10 and #11.
Elizabeth, Edison, Toms River, and Woodbridge are bigger than both Camden and Trenton- There's other bigger cities too..

Edison, Brick, and Toms River are also one of the safest cities in the nation (Brick is a tad smaller than Camden, which was #1 on that very list)-- But of course, go on and act like such an expert and spell Paterson with 2 T's.

Edison grew 10% from 1990-2000. It grew by 4% from 2000-2008
Woodbridge grew 4% from 1990-2000. It grew by 1% from 2000-2008
Toms River grew 18% from 1990-2000. It grew by 6% from 2000-2008
~~

I'd love to see you post population patters in Newark-Paterson-Trenton from 1850-1900.. These cities are historic, industrious cities that shaped the nation. NJ in general is what controlled much of the financial growth of the North East.... Like most industrious cities, they were stricken with hard times- NJ's cities don't even have big land masses, nor do they even hold a credible percentage of the states population.


Quote:
Yet and New Jersey is still loosing residents to crime filled Georgia.What does that say about New Jersey?Youve had at least 3 corrupt Governor face all kinds of charges in the past 20 years.
You'd have to be an idiot to not even come up with an answer for that yourself.

GA square milage- 59,441
NJ square milage- 8,772

GA is almost 7 times larger than NJ.

Now time to use some math- NJ has almost 9 million and GA has almost 10 million- For NJ to even have a population anywhere near GA's is incredible on NJ's part.

If GA was to pack people the way NJ does, they'd have nearly 66,000,000 people. So for you to even talk about GA's growth, please spare your logic and don't go and compare it to one of the smallest (land wise), most dense state in the nation. NJ experienced a more incredible growth in the past. It's pretty stable now, NJ is no where near being decrepid state the way you're making it out to be.

Last edited by BPerone201; 08-16-2010 at 03:24 PM..
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:05 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,381 posts, read 22,526,883 times
Reputation: 4504
You don't have European Standard Highways like we do.......The NJ TPK Network is built to European standards. 10 ft wide shoulders & simple signs. Also Future SMART Highway controls.





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Old 08-16-2010, 03:07 PM
 
Location: The City
21,915 posts, read 30,636,634 times
Reputation: 7468
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Yet and New Jersey is still loosing residents to crime filled Georgia.What does that say about New Jersey?

One NJ is not losing population

Two in general people move to lower cost areas, a much easier move than moving from a cheaper place to a more costly one. That is something that the growth cities have in common, they are cheaper on COL. CA was at one time too remember
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:09 PM
 
Location: The City
21,915 posts, read 30,636,634 times
Reputation: 7468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
You don't have European Standard Highways like we do.......The NJ TPK Network is built to European standards. 10 ft wide shoulders & simple signs. Also Future SMART Highway controls.





I have always found GA to have pretty good highways though I would agree that NJ for the most part has pretty good highways, especially by NE standards where in general I find them to be poor
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:16 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
7,790 posts, read 11,671,247 times
Reputation: 5383
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
So what does that have to do with the State of Georgia?Its federal.
And honestly not that bad of an idea. The area it might be built in is the central section between I-10 and I-20 through Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. People in that area may have to travel 150 miles or more to just travel west or east on a major interstate. Also, the entire area through all four states is very sparsely populated, primarily agrarian, with the biggest city on the entire route being Albany, GA (population 76,939).

So given the people who live in the area would have the need to move on an infrequent basis (and when they do it's usually to move their product out to market) then having just a clean, well built highway would be sufficient and far cheaper than building rail transit for that area. I'm a big booster of rail transit and hate driving, but it doesn't fix every problem. Sometimes roads are more appropriate.
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:29 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
5,256 posts, read 11,548,224 times
Reputation: 3072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
You don't have European Standard Highways like we do.......The NJ TPK Network is built to European standards. 10 ft wide shoulders & simple signs. Also Future SMART Highway controls.




No offense, but why does everything you compare have to do with transportation?

NJ has a better highway/Public Transportation system- That was already discussed and settled, there's no point to keep shoving it in these people's faces.
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:36 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,381 posts, read 22,526,883 times
Reputation: 4504
Quote:
Originally Posted by BPerone201 View Post
No offense, but why does everything you compare have to do with transportation?

NJ has a better highway/Public Transportation system- That was already discussed and settled, there's no point to keep shoving it in these people's faces.
Your doing the same thing with the cities. I haven't compared our Roadway / Bridge system yet....only Rail.
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:44 PM
 
2,756 posts, read 5,198,769 times
Reputation: 729
Quote:
Originally Posted by BPerone201 View Post
No offense, but why does everything you compare have to do with transportation?

NJ has a better highway/Public Transportation system- That was already discussed and settled, there's no point to keep shoving it in these people's faces.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Your doing the same thing with the cities. I haven't compared our Roadway / Bridge system yet....only Rail.
We're allies here folks lol

http://americancityandcounty.com/fea...t_ahead_curve/

Last edited by 66nexus; 08-16-2010 at 04:18 PM..
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