U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-02-2013, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,364,462 times
Reputation: 3539

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by UDResident View Post
Wow people from other cities are delusional.

Philadelphia people are ugly? Man that's funny, because personally I think quite a few of the people from these "beautiful" cities are ugly. I'll take an Italian, a TRUE Irish, a Polish, a Russian/Eastern European, a Latina, a black/African girl, an Indian/Middle Eastern girl, etc from Philadelphia or its metro over the fake people from those "beautiful" cities any day. Hot and real... what's not to love?
Haha! Truth!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-02-2013, 09:07 PM
 
735 posts, read 917,513 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
Explain how Philly gets its consumables, machinery,building materials,autos,and just about everything the city needs.....? I can tell you know little about logistics. Large eastern cities are old, narrow streets, congestion ,etc. that it makes deliveries and pick/ups often difficult.In the case of oversize loads, specially over height, it can be a nightmare with all the low overpasses . Sometimes you can not even get to your destination.
Rail. Air. Water.

All came before trucking and other auto-transport.

So do I, and even more about history.

Last edited by JMT; 02-04-2013 at 09:37 AM.. Reason: Removed the part of your post which was a response to another post which has been deleted.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2013, 09:37 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,473,045 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDResident View Post
Rail. Air. Water.

All came before trucking and other auto-transport.

So do I, and even more about history.

The ugliest people by far come from the suburbs, namely the suburbs of the West Coast. You all don't age well at all.

Sorry, but none of those pathetic lists written by suburbanites will ever be the least bit accurate. Do you have any idea how damn average and generic you all look?

The truth hurts, doesn't it?
Now I know , you do not know much about logistics. First Philly is not a major port for consumer goods inbound and out bound. Second , even if some goods come by water, how do you get these goods from the pier through those narrow streets ? Third, by air ? No , very little consumables come by air, toilet paper by airplanes, you could not afford the price! Actually air cargo is seldom used for anything that could come by truck that does not require overnight delivery, and, even if, still takes a truck to make the deliveries.. Take rail, sounds good, been around a long time, however, if your bread, milk, eggs all came by rail, you would not eat them, they would be rotten ! Anything computer controlled will always come by truck due to the machinery damage if put in a rail car, or even COFC. I have never seen a train delivering cars to a dealership ether. Philly is no different than any other place around the country. Actually, Much of the capital goods come to Philly from Chicago , because of its central location. Chicago and its burbs has always been an outbound place..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2013, 09:43 PM
 
735 posts, read 917,513 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
Now I know , you do not know much about logistics. First Philly is not a major port for consumer goods inbound and out bound. Second , even if some goods come by water, how do you get these goods from the pier through those narrow streets ? Third, by air ? No , very little consumables come by air, toilet paper by airplanes, you could not afford the price! Actually air cargo is seldom used for anything that could come by truck that does not require overnight delivery, and, even if, still takes a truck to make the deliveries.. Take rail, sounds good, been around a long time, however, if your bread, milk, eggs all came by rail, you would not eat them, they would be rotten ! Anything computer controlled will always come by truck due to the machinery damage if put in a rail car, or even COFC. I have never seen a train delivering cars to a dealership ether. Philly is no different than any other place around the country. Actually, Much of the capital goods come to Philly from Chicago , because of its central location. Chicago and its burbs has always been an outbound place..
Sorry buddy but I very much do. I suggest you learn history. Philadelphia was a major port before New York was. It still is one.

There's rail right by the ports. OOPS. Guess you should've done your homework, huh?

That's funny because there's a UPS shipping center in Philadelphia right next to the airport

Yes, and your point? Please don't try to tell me our milk comes from Chicago because it's local.

Not really but hey think whatever you want.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2013, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,001,842 times
Reputation: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
Now I know , you do not know much about logistics. First Philly is not a major port for consumer goods inbound and out bound.
It's a large port for perishables and other niche goods (particularly steel and wood). I'm not sure why it's a big port for steel and wood, but Philly is one of the biggest ports for things like fruit and cocoa because of past capital investments. The Philadelphia ports are unmatched in terms of refrigeration facilities. Half of the nation's cocoa beans, a third of the bananas, and a quarter of the fruits and nuts come through the Philadelphia area ports. Oil is the big money-maker, though (there are several regional refineries).

It's a pretty poor container port, though, as the river is just too shallow. There are plans to dredge the Delaware, which coincide with plans to widen the Panama Canal.


Some more specific information:
http://www.pidc-pa.org/userfiles/fil...eaterPhila.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2013, 10:06 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,473,045 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDResident View Post
Sorry buddy but I very much do. I suggest you learn history. Philadelphia was a major port before New York was. It still is one.

There's rail right by the ports. OOPS. Guess you should've done your homework, huh?

That's funny because there's a UPS shipping center in Philadelphia right next to the airport

Yes, and your point? Please don't try to tell me our milk comes from Chicago because it's local.

Not really but hey think whatever you want.
You do not read what I said very carefully. Listen " buddy" I have been in the logistics business for over 40 years, you have no idea how it works. It's a waste of time, but just for the record,the major ports for machinery is Newport News and Norfolk. Before that Baltimore was , mostly because its the furthest inland port we have. New York is no where close to Newark ether. Philly does get a lot of bulk traffic, steel is major.Ya OOPS to you. Do you even know what COFC is ? Tell me what having rail tracks at the port has to do with delivering goods to businesses , factories, in Philly ? You ever tried to ship 10,000 lbs by UPS ? There's so much more, but I won' t strain your mind so much....you need time to rearsch , learn what I have said.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2013, 10:16 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,473,045 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
It's a large port for perishables and other niche goods (particularly steel and wood). I'm not sure why it's a big port for steel and wood, but Philly is one of the biggest ports for things like fruit and cocoa because of past capital investments. The Philadelphia ports are unmatched in terms of refrigeration facilities. Half of the nation's cocoa beans, a third of the bananas, and a quarter of the fruits and nuts come through the Philadelphia area ports. Oil is the big money-maker, though (there are several regional refineries).

It's a pretty poor container port, though, as the river is just too shallow. There are plans to dredge the Delaware, which coincide with plans to widen the Panama Canal.


Some more specific information:
http://www.pidc-pa.org/userfiles/fil...eaterPhila.pdf
The key is all the perishables that come in by ship are mostly in a raw state. They may ship out by rail, and if they do, it's mostly going to be by container, which most of these goods come by container, which you said has a hard time getting in due to draft. So, how does this effect deliveries within Philly , which would be by truck ether way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2013, 10:38 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,473,045 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
It's a large port for perishables and other niche goods (particularly steel and wood). I'm not sure why it's a big port for steel and wood, but Philly is one of the biggest ports for things like fruit and cocoa because of past capital investments. The Philadelphia ports are unmatched in terms of refrigeration facilities. Half of the nation's cocoa beans, a third of the bananas, and a quarter of the fruits and nuts come through the Philadelphia area ports. Oil is the big money-maker, though (there are several regional refineries).

It's a pretty poor container port, though, as the river is just too shallow. There are plans to dredge the Delaware, which coincide with plans to widen the Panama Canal.


Some more specific information:
http://www.pidc-pa.org/userfiles/fil...eaterPhila.pdf
Just a side note; My guess Hershey has a lot to do with the cocoa deliveries. Also, eastern Pa has lots of factories packaging / processing food stuffs . I never have been in the reefer trade/ transport, so how much goes out of the Port by truck or rail , not sure. I do know Hershey gets a lot of liquid bulk containers by rail. I forgot Wood, yes we have hauled a lot off the pier inPhilly, along with Steel, mostly coils.( not my bag) .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2013, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,001,842 times
Reputation: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
The key is all the perishables that come in by ship are mostly in a raw state. They may ship out by rail, and if they do, it's mostly going to be by container, which most of these goods come by container, which you said has a hard time getting in due to draft. So, how does this effect deliveries within Philly , which would be by truck ether way.
It does not effect deliveries within the city. I just found this report on the port of Philadelphia to be very interesting and I thought I'd share it. I also added a few excerpts for those who don't want to read the whole thing. But it's an interesting read, so I recommend it.

(repost: http://www.pidc-pa.org/userfiles/fil...eaterPhila.pdf)

Philadelphia's advantages are in bulk and breakbulk. Some of those goods are shipped by train and some are by truck. The ports have pretty good access to the highways and the roads are considered one of Philadelphia's competitive strengths because they're less crowded than the New York/Newark and the Virginia ports. Here's what it says (hopefully, I'm not mischaracterizing it):

Quote:
Landside Infrastructure Capacity. The region’s major highways, including Interstate 95, Interstate 476, Interstate 76, Pennsylvania Turnpike, and New Jersey Turnpike create an extensive arterial network serving both North-South and EastWest freight corridors. These roadways are close to the region’s port facilities and have low levels of ongestion relative to competitor ports, thus providing competitive connections to large clusters of distribution facilities in South Central Pennsylvania, the Lehigh Valley, and Central New Jersey.
The region’s freight rail network also is extensive and well-connected to the river. Both CSX and Norfolk Southern have modern intermodal facilities adjacent to Packer Avenue Marine Terminal. Combined, the region’s road and rail infrastructure represent a critical support mechanism for moving cargo from the Delaware River ports to a final destination.
The port of Philadelphia is 11th in tonnage and 6th in value (for imports). It is 22nd in value of exports (primarily cars and other high-value-added goods). (This does not count Wilmington, Chester, Camden, etc.).

Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
Just a side note; My guess Hershey has a lot to do with the cocoa deliveries. Also, eastern Pa has lots of factories packaging / processing food stuffs . I never have been in the reefer trade/ transport, so how much goes out of the Port by truck or rail , not sure. I do know Hershey gets a lot of liquid bulk containers by rail. I forgot Wood, yes we have hauled a lot off the pier inPhilly, along with Steel, mostly coils.( not my bag) .
Hershey and Mars are both located in Pennsylvania, so it almost certainly has an impact. It's primarily due to Philadelphia's advantage in refrigeration storage. These are still relatively small markets, even if the Delaware River has a disproportionate share of them. The advantage is that Philadelphia gets access to cheeses and beers that are not as common elsewhere (even in New York). Weirdly, there are some West Coast beers (that obviously ship by rail) that are only available in Philadelphia (Russian River being the most famous of them).

Anyway, I recommend you give the report a glance and tell me if you have any thoughts. Obviously, I don't know nearly as much as you do, but it seems interesting. The report does a pretty thorough detailing of the advantages and disadvantages of the Delaware River ports.

Last edited by pgm123; 02-02-2013 at 11:05 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2013, 11:57 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,473,045 times
Reputation: 2708
Yes that report was very Intersting. It reinforces what we always knew about many of the limitations the Deleware river ports have. I knew about the double stack trains not able to get under the old bridges. That really hurts, along with the draft problems. Intersting how much break bulk traffic that comes into these ports.The steel and wood are not containerized , so , I guess you do what you can do best to attract the ships to travel up river 80 miles.
There always has been comparison and compatation All up and down the eastern seaboard for attracting international business. So much also has to do with labor costs. I know that had a lot to do with Baltimore's loss, big time ! Even today, Norfolk had most of the container inbound, yet Now Newport News has replaced Newark and Norfolk as the best port to load trucks, even though it is further inland for surface transport. Most of the ships start unloading as far south as Jacksonville then work their way up the seaboard anyway. Is too bad we have lost the export business , those days are gone, I remember them well.I had many forwarders, customs brokers and shipping lines that used our services in Chicago area for outbound business.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top