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Old 05-24-2010, 09:23 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clean_polo View Post
In the second picture, I've never even noticed that tall building with the antenna to the left of the Sears Tower, what building is that? It looks great.
that is trump tower, assuming you are talking about this.

probably haven't seen it b/c it was completed in 2008

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Old 05-24-2010, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clean_polo View Post
In the second picture, I've never even noticed that tall building with the antenna to the left of the Sears Tower, what building is that? It looks great.
That's the new Trump Tower. Probably the nicest building ever to bear that name.
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Old 05-24-2010, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,179,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
looking north...



what you can see of the condo buildings down the lake with pretty much no break is a good 10 miles long from city center and in northern most neighborhood there rogers park the density is still 35,000 pppsm...which is about where this pic is shot from the lower left corner the 4 brown buildings are presidential towers which is on madison 0 north/south.

it goes back the other way south pretty far as well like that...


back the other way..
Does it literally stretch for 10 miles?

Nice pictures by the way, the second one looks great in evening scene.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clean_polo View Post
In the second picture, I've never even noticed that tall building with the antenna to the left of the Sears Tower, what building is that? It looks great.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ois_Center.jpg

That picture does not belong to me, but IMHO, it's one of the best shots taken for that building. The building is new, and right now it's the 2nd tallest building in the United States. First being Willis Tower to the right of Grapico's picture.
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Old 05-24-2010, 09:49 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 23,761,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OmShahi View Post
Does it literally stretch for 10 miles?

Nice pictures by the way, the second one looks great in evening scene.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ois_Center.jpg

That picture does not belong to me, but IMHO, it's one of the best shots taken for that building. The building is new, and right now it's the 2nd tallest building in the United States. First being Willis Tower to the right of Grapico's picture.

I would say so yes... or more... you've got condo line going all the way down the lake at least up to touhy if I recall which is 7200 north or 9 miles from 0 madison, plus it goes back further to at least 2000 south, so that is actually over 10 miles.



smaller pic but one of only full skylines I can find.
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Old 05-24-2010, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,179,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
I would say so yes... or more... you've got condo line going all the way down the lake at least up to touhy if I recall which is 7200 north or 9 miles from 0 madison, plus it goes back further to at least 2000 south, so that is actually over 10 miles.



smaller pic but one of only full skylines I can find.
That stretch of the skyline is simply massive by longevity, the location on the front of Lake Michigan makes it nice too.

The reason why I've always preferred Chicago by a long shot over Houston has been mainly because of the urban feel to it, it's nice to be able to walk down the street and realize you are not the only one doing it. The night life is great too, and the summer nights make it all the better.

It actually has a big city feel, which is something I always like about a city.
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Old 05-24-2010, 09:59 PM
 
2,420 posts, read 3,843,186 times
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Chicago was designed better for modern times, as are most U.S. cities, than Philadelphia(William Penn never saw the car, or globalization coming).

This is holds Philly back, and is the main reason why Chicago and some other cities outshine it.
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Old 05-24-2010, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Jersey Boy living in Florida
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Ahh thats the new Trump Tower huh? Beautiful building.
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Old 05-25-2010, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,265 posts, read 7,189,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killakoolaide View Post
Chicago was designed better for modern times, as are most U.S. cities, than Philadelphia(William Penn never saw the car, or globalization coming).

This is holds Philly back, and is the main reason why Chicago and some other cities outshine it.
I stronly disagree with this. That is not to say I don't think Chicago is well-designed or modern (I've unfortunately never been, but it looks fantastic).

However, Philadelphia is a city that was designed with the person in mind, and that is something that is absolutely relevant in modern times. Because history tends to repeat itself, urban planners are once again placing a huge emphasis on streetscape, walkability and a "sense of place." All of these aspects are very much built into the design of colonial-era cities like Philadelphia.

That is not to say Philly cannot do more to build up its infrastructure to compete more globally. Still, I think the "bones" of Philly are very befitting to energy efficiency and sustainable growth (much less susceptible to things like oil crises). In particular, a low-rise, high-density design is very people-friendly, and that is something that will always make Philadelphia appealing.

Last edited by Duderino; 05-25-2010 at 07:36 AM..
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Old 05-25-2010, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,887 posts, read 12,191,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killakoolaide View Post
Chicago was designed better for modern times, as are most U.S. cities, than Philadelphia(William Penn never saw the car, or globalization coming).

This is holds Philly back, and is the main reason why Chicago and some other cities outshine it.
Hold it back ? Or make it unbelievably unique?

Chicago missed out on 1/2 of the US history that Philadlephia was afforded and preserved.

NYC bulldozed much of its history in the sake of redevelopment. For better or worse Philadelphia did not as most of the city remains organically intact. Most streets /neighborhoods in Philly have never been altered since their beginning, as long as 300 years ago.

Same as its always been.




Last edited by rainrock; 05-25-2010 at 08:38 AM..
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Old 05-25-2010, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,611 posts, read 24,787,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killakoolaide View Post
Chicago was designed better for modern times, as are most U.S. cities, than Philadelphia(William Penn never saw the car, or globalization coming).

This is holds Philly back, and is the main reason why Chicago and some other cities outshine it.
My only knock on Chicago is that it is far less walkable than I thought it would be. Density wise, I think it's comparable to outer sections of Queens and the northernmost sections of the Bronx. That is, you have a lot of free standing houses that have a few feet between them. But there were very few storefronts, bodegas, etc.

I would say Philly is more similar to Flatbush, Brooklyn. It's a dense, flat, low-lying city. We have blocks and blocks of rowhomes with cornerstores, delis, and bars mixed in.
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