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Old 09-11-2010, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Things have certainly changed here. Coke really did used to largely be the universal name for years, but soda (closer in to Atlanta, anyway) seems to have taken over.
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
The map is 7 years old - things can change in 7 years.
Not that much, I doubt. All in all, I believe the map is fairly accurate. Regional speech and idiom patterns endure quite a bit.
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
Things have certainly changed here. Coke really did used to largely be the universal name for years, but soda (closer in to Atlanta, anyway) seems to have taken over.
That is probably true of most large urban areas in the South, John. The large numbers of northern transplants probably has a lot to do with it. As does, to a lesser -- but still noteable -- extent, the influence of the mass-media culture on younger, native, kids.
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by detroitlove View Post
mostly great lakes region say pop. Oh and I think the map is wrong anyway. When I lived in the south most southern people said soda not coke.
Agreed. I never hear Southerners use "Coke" generically. True Coca-Cola drinkers say it, of course, to emphasize the fact that they DO NOT want Pepsi. Pepsi drinkers are the same way. People are extremely serious about which one they prefer.
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
That is probably true of most large urban areas in the South, John. The large numbers of northern transplants probably has a lot to do with it. As does, to a lesser -- but still noteable -- extent, the influence of the mass-media culture on younger, native, kids.

Spot-on on all counts, as usual!

I do have to admit that I am partnered with someone from, and visit - the land 'o pop! (Western MI).
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gold15 View Post
Agreed. I never hear Southerners use "Coke" generically. True Coca-Cola drinkers say it, of course, to emphasize the fact that they DO NOT want Pepsi. Pepsi drinkers are the same way. People are extremely serious about which one they prefer.
Not to be sarcastic, but where are you from in the South? I just find it hard to believe a native Southerner could not possibly have never heard "coke" as the common term.

Of course, I do think there is a certain younger/older plus black/white "division" within the South as to the use of "coke" as a generic term for soft-drink. For instance, it has been my experience that most black Southerners say "soda"...where as most white Southerners use "coke"
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
Spot-on on all counts, as usual!

I do have to admit that I am partnered with someone from, and visit - the land 'o pop! (Western MI).
LOL Just last summer, my fiance and I went to Kansas and met some people at a little eating joint and she asked "what type of cokes do you have"?

Break here a bit...

Actually, she phrased it that way just to see what response she would get. Because, for one, she is not a native Southerner (she is from Colorado) and, two, didn't really start using "coke" until she lived down here for several years and it sorta "grew" on her. When we first hooked up, she was as clueless as they come when I would ask her if she wanted a "coke".

Anyway, I was all this time, amused, and KNEW what was going to happen.

Sure enough, the waiter looked at her as if she had dropped down from another planet. He replied, bumfuzzled, "we have coca-cola...diet, light..."

Last edited by TexasReb; 09-11-2010 at 11:37 PM..
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Not to be sarcastic, but where are you from in the South? I just find it hard to believe a native Southerner could not possibly have never heard "coke" as the common term.

Of course, I do think there is a certain younger/older plus black/white "division" within the South as to the use of "coke" as a generic term for soft-drink. For instance, it has been my experience that most black Southerners say "soda"...where as most white Southerners use "coke"
Born, raised, educated... North Carolina.
Reside... Georgia. (Home of "Coke")

And if we must... your "experience" across different demographic groups would support what I posted.

I didn't take your post with a sarcastic tone; however, please trust that I know what *I've* heard.
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:00 PM
 
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the fact that st. louis is essentially the oldest major city in the midwest ties it intrinsically to the east. st. louis was an early trading center with philadelphia and baltimore long before chicago established itself as a commercial outpost for new york. founded in 1764, st. louis is older than the entire united states. that tells you something about its historic character.
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gold15 View Post
Born, raised, educated... North Carolina.
Reside... Georgia. (Home of "Coke")

And if we must... your "experience" across different demographic groups would support what I posted.

I didn't take your post with a sarcastic tone; however, please trust that I know what *I've* heard.
No reason to question your personal experience. Did I imply otherwise?

Anyway, I notice that the Carolinas seem to be a bit of "odd man out" as concerns the majority useage of generic coke elsewhere in the South. I remember an older guy from South Carolina once telling me that he grew up hearing "dopers" for soft-drink.
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