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Old 08-11-2013, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
1,241 posts, read 1,535,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Not judging here, but I've honestly never understood why people use 'coke' to describe all sodas, or pops if you will.

If I were a server and heard 'coke' I would at first think the brand coke, not a general term for all soft drinks. Very odd to me, but I'm sure we say things up here people think are odd!
Indeed it is odd to me to hear people say "soda" and it is especially odd for me to hear people say "pop".

I think the map is more or less correct for New Mexico since everybody I know who is native to the state uses the term "coke" to refer to all soft drinks. Growing up I knew people who moved here from California who would say "soda" and it sounded so funny to me. My grandfather used to use the term "pop" yet he was from Mexico. I mentioned in another thread on here about this subject that I think it was because he used to work in the mines in Northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado and I think he must've worked with other miners who were originally from the Midwest and that's how he picked up the word.

Those people I knew from California also would call the grocery store "the market" whereas we locals refer to is as "the grocery store" or simply "the store". They would also say they were 'going to do their marketing' whereas we say we are "going to the store" or "going shopping".
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Old 08-11-2013, 08:06 AM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,478,015 times
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"Pop" originated from Detroit (Faygo "Pop"), and that's largely where it has remained dominant.

I visited Washington DC years ago and, needless to say, I got a rude awakening using the term "Pop" from the locals.
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Old 08-11-2013, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 2,998,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
It's only Coke on first reference:

"I'll get us some Cokes. What do y'all want?"
"I'll have a Sprite."
"Me too!"
"OK!" (To counter person): "Two Sprites and a Coke, please."
"Here you go!"
"Thank-you!"
"You're welcome! Have a nice day!"
"You too!"
I'm not sure if you were the person who posted this before, but there was a great post in an earlier discussion of pop/soda/coke that explained the nuance of using the generic coke. Saying "coke machine" instead of soda machine (or vending machine). But not saying, "What kind of coke would you like?" I definitely learned a lot and it kind of makes sense (though I'd never say it myself).

Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
"Pop" originated from Detroit (Faygo "Pop"), and that's largely where it has remained dominant.

I visited Washington DC years ago and, needless to say, I got a rude awakening using the term "Pop" from the locals.
Wasn't there also a big Milwaukee soda company that used the term "soda"? From what I understand, the pop/soda distinction has to do with the market share of certain companies (Faygo vs. the Milwaukee equivalent). I would guess St. Louis would have had a dominant company that used "soda." I doubt it has to do with St. Louis's age since that's before soft drinks were popular.
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Old 08-11-2013, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Chicago
2,357 posts, read 2,014,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
As for why St. Louis and Milwakee deviates from its surrounding areas I am not really sure. One guess is that 100 or so years ago there might have been local brands who used the word soda and it stuck.
As someone originally from the St. Louis area, I do know that there's the Vess Soda company that's about 90 to 100 years old at this point, and it's local to St. Louis and its metro. I'm not sure if it is the reason why St. Louisans say soda rather than pop or not, but it probably helped.
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Old 08-11-2013, 08:32 PM
 
11,898 posts, read 9,630,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQalex View Post
Indeed it is odd to me to hear people say "soda" and it is especially odd for me to hear people say "pop".

I think the map is more or less correct for New Mexico since everybody I know who is native to the state uses the term "coke" to refer to all soft drinks. Growing up I knew people who moved here from California who would say "soda" and it sounded so funny to me. My grandfather used to use the term "pop" yet he was from Mexico. I mentioned in another thread on here about this subject that I think it was because he used to work in the mines in Northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado and I think he must've worked with other miners who were originally from the Midwest and that's how he picked up the word.

Those people I knew from California also would call the grocery store "the market" whereas we locals refer to is as "the grocery store" or simply "the store". They would also say they were 'going to do their marketing' whereas we say we are "going to the store" or "going shopping".
It's only weird to me because "coke" is obviously a soft drink brand. If it weren't, it would be just like saying the general terms "pop" or "soda". "Pop" is a bit odd to me, but not nearly as much as "coke". Isn't it funny how differently people say things regionally?
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Old 08-11-2013, 08:40 PM
 
787 posts, read 1,423,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
It's only weird to me because "coke" is obviously a soft drink brand. If it weren't, it would be just like saying the general terms "pop" or "soda". "Pop" is a bit odd to me, but not nearly as much as "coke". Isn't it funny how differently people say things regionally?
True. Saying coke for any soft drink does sound strange to me as well.



But isn't it crazy how Americans will often refer to any kind of tissue as "Kleenex" though? I don't even really think of it as the brand.
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Old 08-11-2013, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Queens, NY
199 posts, read 341,840 times
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Not sure why "pop" picked up so prevalently throughout the Midwest, but I'm grateful for the people in the greater St. Louis and eastern Wisconsin regions for using the right term. Chicago, Cleveland, take note. Buffalo, your use of "pop" is inexcusable. You're New Yorkers for crying out loud. In name at the very least. Get with the program! ;-)

The term "soda" comes directly from sodium-bicarbonate - the natural carbonation in mineral water. When entrepreneurs began experimenting with the carbonation process, they sold a product fairly universally called "soda water" throughout the US. Phosphate sodas were popular in the late 19th century and soda fountains emerged in the 1830s along the East Coast. Soda jerks worked at pharmacies and ice cream parlors, soda siphons became a popular do-it-yourself soda-making tool at home for middle class social events, spritzing alcoholic drinks with seltzer/soda water and fruit or spiced syrups to make the sodas more familiar to our palettes today. Soda fountains, soda jerks, ice cream sodas, club soda.. there's a pattern here, no?? Try as I may, I couldn't find "pop jerk", and when searching for "pop fountain", mostly came up with "soda pop fountain" in the results. "Ice cream pop" brought up popsicles or ice cream on a stick, and "club pop" is a Parisian discoteque. Not trying to criticize one's vernacular here. Just saying, you're wrong, wrong, wrong.

Still, less confusing than having a waitress in Jackson, MS bring you a Pepsi and announce "Here's your coke!" while you question your sanity.
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Old 08-11-2013, 08:54 PM
 
11,898 posts, read 9,630,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakal View Post
True. Saying coke for any soft drink does sound strange to me as well.



But isn't it crazy how Americans will often refer to any kind of tissue as "Kleenex" though? I don't even really think of it as the brand.
Yes. I personally rarely hear anyone call a tissue a Kleenex, they're always tissues. I don't know it saying tissues is a NJ area thing, and Kleenex is another region, but I am aware people call them Kleenexes as if the brand is the only tissue. Funny stuff.
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Old 08-11-2013, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Miss Jankins (Say nothing bad).
1,232 posts, read 1,356,874 times
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Hey New Yorkers! Did Shasta commercials air in your region?



Other than an occasional Mountain Dew for caffeine, I gave up pop long ago.

Now, who calls their front room a living room?
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Old 08-11-2013, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
1,241 posts, read 1,535,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Yes. I personally rarely hear anyone call a tissue a Kleenex, they're always tissues. I don't know it saying tissues is a NJ area thing, and Kleenex is another region, but I am aware people call them Kleenexes as if the brand is the only tissue. Funny stuff.
Similar to that is the use of "clorox" to refer to any bleach, especially store brands. I myself have often used the name "clorox" when referring to another brand of bleach. But I do also often use the generic term "bleach" to refer to brands other than Clorox.

Another example is "band-aid" to refer to any brand of adhesive bandage other than the actual Band-Aid brand.

The most infamous example is probably the use of "aspirin" to refer to any pain reliever. Aspirin started out as a brand and then became the generally accepted generic name for all pain reliever pills:

Aspirin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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