U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-15-2010, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,619 posts, read 3,218,337 times
Reputation: 724

Advertisements

I would prefer a 3 season climate: spring, summer, fall. I don't like cold winters . Anything below 50 is pretty cold for me. Maybe 40s in the night is ok, but above 50 in the day please.

I like day temperatures in the 70s and 80s. Above 90 is hot, and I don't like it above 95 either. A nice rainy season can also be good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-15-2010, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,450,219 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trade Wind View Post
Let me just mention a few things…since you seem interested...and I have done alot of climate research over the years:

First, no doubt deserts are warmer than coastal areas. Worldwide deserts (Cairo, Phoenix, etc) heat up faster because dry air heats up faster than humid air…and solar radiation (sunshine) is normally greater in the cloudless desert areas on average. So it’s not surprising that Phoenix and Palm Springs are quite warm in winter. However… southern Florida (Miami, Palm Beach, Key West, Ft. Lauderdale, Naples…etc) on the Gulf coast/East Coast - is still the warmest region on the USA mainland in winter.

As far as record cold…outside of deep south Florida…while cold snaps are not very likely along the Gulf/south Atlantic or coastal California…they are not unheard of in either area. You must remember that there is a great variation to climate over time: some decades see several frosts in one area (coastal TX)…some decades see frosts in another area (coastal CA). As recently as 1990 and 1998…temps in much of coastal California fell into the 20’s F. A major freeze hit coastal California shortly before Christmas in December, 1990 and 1998. These freezes sent temperatures plunging into the low 20's in many Citrus and Avocado growing areas, causing millions of dollars in damage up and down the state:

Using Online Resources to Determine Your Gardening Microclimate. (http://www.cloudforest.com/weather/weather_res.html - broken link)

The same goes for snowfall…one decade, a rare snow event might occur in one region of the American subtropics (Texas)…another decade snow might occur in another region of the American subtropics (LA). Los Angeles has had snow several times…including January 1949 – when 3.0 inches officially fell downtown (parts of the eastern side of the city reported amounts from 8 to 12 inches). Even as recently as 2007 – there was a light dusting of snow in Malibu area and in West Los Angeles.

Snow in Los Angeles (Pasadena) 1949:



1949 Snowstorm in LA:
Lake Avenue Snow, January 11, 1949 - Los Angeles Metro, CA Local News - Fwix

So the cities on the Gulf Coast/Southeast Atlantic coast are not alone in rare snowfall. The only city on the USA mainland where no trace of snow has ever been known to occur in 300 years - is Key West, FL. In Miami – only once in the last 100 years has a trace (meaning less than 0.1 inches) of snow been seen in the Miami area - in 1977.

My original point…was comparing coastal California and the Gulf/East Coast in terms of warm/hot temps. The fact remains that the Gulf and south Atlantic states are significantly warmer than anywhere in coastal California much of the year. In winter...cities like LA, San Diego, Long Beach…etc are only 3 to 6 F warmer during the day than most cities on the Gulf Coast/lower East Coast (north of Florida). Here are some comparisons of daily winter highs using National Weather Service data:

Long Beach, CA
Dec – 67 F
Jan – 67 F
Feb – 67 F

Corpus Christi, TX
Dec – 68 F
Jan – 66 F
Feb – 70 F

San Diego, CA
Dec – 66 F
Jan – 65 F
Feb – 66 F

New Orleans, LA
Dec – 64 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 65 F

Savannah, GA
Dec – 62 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 64 F

In any of the cities listed above on the Gulf/lower East Coast…beyond the 3 winter months (Dec/Jan/Feb)…the weather is warmer in every single month compared to anywhere in coastal California. Coastal southern California (south of Big Sur or so) has great weather frequently – mild /steady/sunny outside of early summer – but my point was if one seeks hot, sunny, beach weather, with much warmer ocean waters (such as I do) for a longest portion of the year…the Gulf/lower East Coast is easily the place to be.
.
As far as human comfort no other state can compare to California. The fact that S. California winters average from the mid 60-low 70's yet are at the same latitude as northern Texas, Arkansas, Georgia & North Carolina is remarkable for California's warmth. Many times during winter California has the warmest temperatures and not just in the desert yet are close to 1000 miles north of deep south Texas and south Florida. That says something loud and clear and one major reason why California has the largest population. Why don't you chose cities at the same latitude as Los Angeles, Palm Springs, San Diego? Places like Dallas, Little Rock, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc. These Southern cities at the same latitude are at least 10 degrees and in many cases close to 20 degrees colder than Los Angeles and other Southern California cities. We don't have lawns that turn brown and trees that lose leaves like all these Southern cities do each winter. Where even citrus trees would die and no flowers grow because nights are too cold in the South right down to the Gulf Coast. LA rarely records maximums below 60F [maybe a few days in the 50's each winter] while these Southern cities as well as Houston, Galveston, New Orleans, Pensocola, Jacksonville are much colder yet much further south than southern California.

There are no U.S. cities at the same latitude as California that have as warm a winter as California. Even San Francisco which is at the same latitude as Washington DC is almost 20 degrees warmer and never experiences frost. Can you name one U.S. city at 37-38N latitude that does not see frost each winter and has a 365 day growing season? Can you name one U.S. that has 365-day growing season? They are San Francisco, LA, San Diego and Miami yet San Fransisco is at least 1500 miles north of south Florida.

The uniqueness of the California climate is moderation with very mild winters and cool summers at least on the immediate coastline. Also there are numerous micro-climates due to mountains and short distances from the ocean so that it can be 75F at the beach but easily 85F downtown LA and 95F in the valleys [all within 10-15 miles of each other]. Where else can you experience that in the nation? Nowhere!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Home!
8,710 posts, read 10,546,091 times
Reputation: 8512
Las Vegas...December 08





http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/kimbay_01/snowinLV121608006.jpg?t=1284608263 (broken link)


I will take the hot, dry, no humidity climate over the MI weather anyday. And since I lived all my life in MI and part time in LV just recently, I can annoy the one poster and say that if I want to see snow, I will go up the mountain!!! Or, just wait for another anomaly like in the pics! At least then I appreciate it as I know it will be gone real soon (this took a couple days and yes, the schools closed!) and the sun and beautiful blue sky will be back!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:52 PM
 
1,729 posts, read 4,066,824 times
Reputation: 979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cali Kidd951 View Post

Humid Hot: I'm not a fan of. I Prefer Dry Heat over Humid.


My Prefered Climate Cities: LA, San Diego, Houston, Miami (Winters)
LOL You don't like Humid and you like Houston?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2010, 07:24 AM
 
Location: USA
151 posts, read 476,804 times
Reputation: 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
As far as human comfort no other state can compare to California. The fact that S. California winters average from the mid 60-low 70's yet are at the same latitude as northern Texas, Arkansas, Georgia & North Carolina is remarkable for California's warmth. Many times during winter California has the warmest temperatures and not just in the desert yet are close to 1000 miles north of deep south Texas and south Florida. That says something loud and clear and one major reason why California has the largest population. Why don't you chose cities at the same latitude as Los Angeles, Palm Springs, San Diego? Places like Dallas, Little Rock, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc. These Southern cities at the same latitude are at least 10 degrees and in many cases close to 20 degrees colder than Los Angeles and other Southern California cities. We don't have lawns that turn brown and trees that lose leaves like all these Southern cities do each winter. Where even citrus trees would die and no flowers grow because nights are too cold in the South right down to the Gulf Coast. LA rarely records maximums below 60F [maybe a few days in the 50's each winter] while these Southern cities as well as Houston, Galveston, New Orleans, Pensocola, Jacksonville are much colder yet much further south than southern California.

There are no U.S. cities at the same latitude as California that have as warm a winter as California. Even San Francisco which is at the same latitude as Washington DC is almost 20 degrees warmer and never experiences frost. Can you name one U.S. city at 37-38N latitude that does not see frost each winter and has a 365 day growing season? Can you name one U.S. that has 365-day growing season? They are San Francisco, LA, San Diego and Miami yet San Fransisco is at least 1500 miles north of south Florida.

The uniqueness of the California climate is moderation with very mild winters and cool summers at least on the immediate coastline. Also there are numerous micro-climates due to mountains and short distances from the ocean so that it can be 75F at the beach but easily 85F downtown LA and 95F in the valleys [all within 10-15 miles of each other]. Where else can you experience that in the nation? Nowhere!
…again there are some errors in that information.

In climate science – generalizations are often misleading: Nowhere in coastal California “averages” highs in the 70’s in winter. That is totally incorrect. I just posted the average highs in coastal CA in the winter months. I’ll post them again:

Long Beach, CA
Dec – 67 F
Jan – 67 F
Feb – 67 F

San Diego, CA
Dec – 66 F
Jan – 65 F
Feb – 66 F

San Francisco
Dec – 56 F
Jan – 56F
Feb – 59 F

As compared to coastal Florida (which actually does have average highs in the 70’s in the winter months):

Tampa
Dec – 73 F
Jan – 71F
Feb – 72 F

Miami
Dec – 78 F
Jan – 76F
Feb – 77 F

...and the cities on the Gulf/South Atlantic which are only 3 to 6 F cooler in the three winter months than LA or San Diego:

New Orleans, LA
Dec – 64 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 65 F

Savannah, GA
Dec – 62 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 64 F

Corpus Christi, TX
Dec – 68 F
Jan – 66 F
Feb – 70 F

You keep switching the debate. We keep bouncing all over the place. We were not talking about Palm Springs or the desert – we were talking about the Pacific Coast and the Gulf/Atlantic Coast. What does latitude have to do with it? I never said parts of CA were not warm for their latitude in winter…but they are COLD for their latitude in summer? Washington DC is warmer than LA in summer and it is 400 miles north of LA. What does that really prove?


The climatic fact remains that the Gulf and south Atlantic coast …beyond the 3 winter months (Dec/Jan/Feb)… is warmer every single month compared to anywhere in coastal California (and even in winter the difference is not that great between a city like New Orleans and LA). Also, it is untrue that lawns turn brown on the Gulf /south Atlantic coast (I think you know this). There are flowers in front of the hotels in the French Quater of New Orleans in Dec/Jan/Feb...etc -lol. The fact remains that hot, sunny, beach weather, with much warmer ocean waters for a longest portion of the year…is found in the Gulf/lower East Coast much more than in coastal California. Much of the year in coastal CA is cool, cloudy in late spring/early summer (gloom/fog...etc)...and the ocean is freezing. It is a climatic fact…and indisputable – trust me.

.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2010, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,692,047 times
Reputation: 7631
I like the cold, but if I do have to live in warmer climates then it has to be moist ones. Dry air causes me hosts of medical discomforts, so I can't stand it for more than a week. I absolutely can't live in any of the low lying areas of Arizona, NM or Nevada. Arizona is such a contrast for me. I love the weather in Flagstaff, but found it absolute torture in Phoenix or Tucson. I have done august and december in Vegas and I just did not go out during the day in august (heat indexes approaching 120 degrees was too much for my caribbean skin)

I think the Pacific North west is the best for me.





Quote:
Originally Posted by kimba01 View Post
Las Vegas...December 08. Or, just wait for another anomaly like in the pics! At least then I appreciate it as I know it will be gone real soon (this took a couple days and yes, the schools closed!) and the sun and beautiful blue sky will be back!

I was there for that snow storm. The cabby told us it won't snow, and the last time they had snow was almost 20 years prior, well it did snow, I have video and pics of it.

I don't think schools were shut down though because that was the week before xmas (we flew back home on the 23rd), but the airport was shut down.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2010, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Home!
8,710 posts, read 10,546,091 times
Reputation: 8512
The schools did close for the next day as my daughter was in 9th grade and was actually missing the snow days from MI! That would not have been a snow day in MI, but there...yeah. I had to go to the school the next day for something and it was dangerous walking through the courtyard as they do not have the equipment to clear it! I pitied the girls in heels!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2010, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,450,219 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trade Wind View Post
…again there are some errors in that information.

In climate science – generalizations are often misleading: Nowhere in coastal California “averages” highs in the 70’s in winter. That is totally incorrect. I just posted the average highs in coastal CA in the winter months. I’ll post them again:

Long Beach, CA
Dec – 67 F
Jan – 67 F
Feb – 67 F

San Diego, CA
Dec – 66 F
Jan – 65 F
Feb – 66 F

San Francisco
Dec – 56 F
Jan – 56F
Feb – 59 F

As compared to coastal Florida (which actually does have average highs in the 70’s in the winter months):

Tampa
Dec – 73 F
Jan – 71F
Feb – 72 F

Miami
Dec – 78 F
Jan – 76F
Feb – 77 F

...and the cities on the Gulf/South Atlantic which are only 3 to 6 F cooler in the three winter months than LA or San Diego:

New Orleans, LA
Dec – 64 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 65 F

Savannah, GA
Dec – 62 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 64 F

Corpus Christi, TX
Dec – 68 F
Jan – 66 F
Feb – 70 F

You keep switching the debate. We keep bouncing all over the place. We were not talking about Palm Springs or the desert – we were talking about the Pacific Coast and the Gulf/Atlantic Coast. What does latitude have to do with it? I never said parts of CA were not warm for their latitude in winter…but they are COLD for their latitude in summer? Washington DC is warmer than LA in summer and it is 400 miles north of LA. What does that really prove?


The climatic fact remains that the Gulf and south Atlantic coast …beyond the 3 winter months (Dec/Jan/Feb)… is warmer every single month compared to anywhere in coastal California (and even in winter the difference is not that great between a city like New Orleans and LA). Also, it is untrue that lawns turn brown on the Gulf /south Atlantic coast (I think you know this). There are flowers in front of the hotels in the French Quater of New Orleans in Dec/Jan/Feb...etc -lol. The fact remains that hot, sunny, beach weather, with much warmer ocean waters for a longest portion of the year…is found in the Gulf/lower East Coast much more than in coastal California. Much of the year in coastal CA is cool, cloudy in late spring/early summer (gloom/fog...etc)...and the ocean is freezing. It is a climatic fact…and indisputable – trust me.

.
And you keep denying that winter in the South is cold compared to California even though it is much further south. Latitude has everything to do with climate. The closer one is to the north pole or equator has significant impact on climate; that is basic science 101. Tampa & Orlando are at 27-28N latitude while Los Angeles is at 34N latitude; the same as Myrtle Beach [appropriately 500 miles north of 27-28N latitude].

Here's Myrtle Beach climate:

Average Maximum:
Winter: 57-61F
Summer: 88-91F
Monthly Averages for Myrtle Beach, SC - weather.com

Los Angeles:
Winter: 68-70F
Summer: 80-85F
Monthly Averages for Los Angeles, CA - weather.com

I don't know where you get the idea that Washington DC is warmer than Los Angeles since if someone in LA wants hot summers [strange as that may be] they move to places like the Woodland Hills section of LA [which is less than 10 miles from the ocean.

WashingtonDC
Winter: 42-47F
Summer: 84-88F
Monthly Averages for Washington, DC - weather.com

LA [Woodland Hills]
Winter: 68-70F
Summer: 89-96F
Monthly Averages for Woodland Hills, CA - weather.com

But since Washington DC is at the same latitude as San Francisco, here's a better comparison:

San Francisco:
Winter: 58-61F
Summer: 68-69F
Monthly Averages for Ocean City, MD - weather.com

Ocean City Maryland
Winter: 44-49F
Summer: 79-84F
Monthly Averages for Ocean City, MD - weather.com

I already provided data for suburbs of Los Angeles or San Diego averaging in the 70's each winter month and they are only 15 miles from the ocean:

Montebello:
Winter: 70-71F
Summer: 84-89F
Monthly Averages for Montebello, CA - weather.com

Santa Fe Springs:
Winter: 70-71F
Summer: 84-89F
Monthly Averages for Santa Fe Springs, CA - weather.com

Santa Ana:
Winter: 69-70F
Summer: 79-84F
Monthly Averages for Santa Ana, CA - weather.com

San Pasqual:
Winter: 70-71F
Summer: 85-92F
Monthly Averages for San Pasqual Battlefield State Park - weather.com

You are correct that the Pacific ocean is cooler than the Atlantic ocean during summer but not during winter and another reason why the California coast has the shortest thermometers anywhere in the U.S. San Francisco goes from 58F in Jan to 71F in September [13 degree difference]. San Diego from 66F in Jan to 78F in August. And the California desert is warmer than any other section of America during winter and summer with the exception of southern Florida yet Miami is at 25N latitude while Palm Spring is 34N.

There are no regions in America as warm as California during winter except areas much further south where one would expect that kind of warmth. That's why subtropical fruit is grown here but would die in south Texas [guava, macadamia, banana]. And you are incorrect if you think that Houston and Dallas are green like Los Angeles and San Diego during winter. I'm not referring to what grows in pots that can be taken indoors at night but rather trees like palms, flowering trees and flowers in the ground. Same for New Orleans; it is too cold for tender plants to survive winter along the Gulf Coast unless one goes deep like Brownsville, Texas at the same latitude as Miami. The reason it gets so cold in the South during winter is the lack of mountains to protect against arctic invasions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2010, 01:51 PM
 
Location: USA
151 posts, read 476,804 times
Reputation: 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
And you keep denying that winter in the South is cold compared to California even though it is much further south. Latitude has everything to do with climate. The closer one is to the north pole or equator has significant impact on climate; that is basic science 101. Tampa & Orlando are at 27-28N latitude while Los Angeles is at 34N latitude; the same as Myrtle Beach [appropriately 500 miles north of 27-28N latitude].

You are correct that the Pacific ocean is cooler than the Atlantic ocean during summer but not during winter and another reason why the California coast has the shortest thermometers anywhere in the U.S. San Francisco goes from 58F in Jan to 71F in September [13 degree difference]. San Diego from 66F in Jan to 78F in August. And the California desert is warmer than any other section of America during winter and summer with the exception of southern Florida yet Miami is at 25N latitude while Palm Spring is 34N.

There are no regions in America as warm as California during winter except areas much further south where one would expect that kind of warmth. That's why subtropical fruit is grown here but would die in south Texas [guava, macadamia, banana]. And you are incorrect if you think that Houston and Dallas are green like Los Angeles and San Diego during winter. I'm not referring to what grows in pots that can be taken indoors at night but rather trees like palms, flowering trees and flowers in the ground. Same for New Orleans; it is too cold for tender plants to survive winter along the Gulf Coast unless one goes deep like Brownsville, Texas at the same latitude as Miami. The reason it gets so cold in the South during winter is the lack of mountains to protect against arctic invasions.
We just showed that daily high temps in the Gulf/South Atlantic states are within 5 F or so of coastal CA – so if the Gulf Coast/lower East Coast is what you would call cold…then cities like LA/San Diego/Long Beach are cold too. Here are the daily highs in winter from the official NWS stations (much more accurate than weather.com)

Long Beach, CA
Dec – 67 F
Jan – 67 F
Feb – 67 F

Corpus Christi, TX
Dec – 68 F
Jan – 66 F
Feb – 70 F

San Diego, CA
Dec – 66 F
Jan – 65 F
Feb – 66 F

New Orleans, LA
Dec – 64 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 65 F

Savannah, GA
Dec – 62 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 64 F

You can see that New Orleans for example, is within a few degrees of Long Beach, CA. “Shortest thermometers “…not sure what that means in climate science…but it doesn’t change the facts: In just about any city on the Gulf/South Atlantic coast from Texas to Wilmington, North Carolina - beyond the 3 winter months (Dec/Jan/Feb)…the weather is warmer every single month compared to anywhere in coastal California (about 8 months or more!). No matter how many different ways you try to spin it – we will still come up with the same facts – lol.

Also, it you are inccorect on ocean temps...the Gulf and South Atlantic are warmer than the Pacific year round. The currents that feed California come from the north Pole (brrrrr)…the currents that feed the Gulf and South Atlantic come from the tropics –lol. The Gulf/lower East Coast has warmer ocean waters in both winter:



...and of course summer - when sea surface tempretures in the Gulf/East Coast blows the doors off the cold Pacific in summer (June through September):




Finally, you are 100% incorrect if you think palms and flowers are not all over the place on the Gulf Coast/South Atlantic in winter. Here are some of the “green” in cities on the Gulf coast. If everything died in winter as you clam…how would these pictures be possible:



Galveston, Texas:




Corpus Christi Texas CITY HALL:




Vacation house on Gulf Shores, Alabama:




Charleston, SC:




Myrtle Beach, SC :




If everthing on the Gulf/lower East Coast died in winter...how can they grow 100 foot palm trees in 6 months - lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2010, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,450,219 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trade Wind View Post
We just showed that daily high temps in the Gulf/South Atlantic states are within 5 F or so of coastal CA – so if the Gulf Coast/lower East Coast is what you would call cold…then cities like LA/San Diego/Long Beach are cold too. Here are the daily highs in winter from the official NWS stations (much more accurate than weather.com)

Long Beach, CA
Dec – 67 F
Jan – 67 F
Feb – 67 F

Corpus Christi, TX
Dec – 68 F
Jan – 66 F
Feb – 70 F

San Diego, CA
Dec – 66 F
Jan – 65 F
Feb – 66 F

New Orleans, LA
Dec – 64 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 65 F

Savannah, GA
Dec – 62 F
Jan – 62 F
Feb – 64 F

You can see that New Orleans for example, is within a few degrees of Long Beach, CA. “Shortest thermometers “…not sure what that means in climate science…but it doesn’t change the facts: In just about any city on the Gulf/South Atlantic coast from Texas to Wilmington, North Carolina - beyond the 3 winter months (Dec/Jan/Feb)…the weather is warmer every single month compared to anywhere in coastal California (about 8 months or more!). No matter how many different ways you try to spin it – we will still come up with the same facts – lol.

Also, it you are inccorect on ocean temps...the Gulf and South Atlantic are warmer than the Pacific year round. The currents that feed California come from the north Pole (brrrrr)…the currents that feed the Gulf and South Atlantic come from the tropics –lol. The Gulf/lower East Coast has warmer ocean waters in both winter:



...and of course summer - when sea surface tempretures in the Gulf/East Coast blows the doors off the cold Pacific in summer (June through September):




Finally, you are 100% incorrect if you think palms and flowers are not all over the place on the Gulf Coast/South Atlantic in winter. Here are some of the “green” in cities on the Gulf coast. If everything died in winter as you clam…how would these pictures be possible:



Galveston, Texas:




Corpus Christi Texas CITY HALL:




Vacation house on Gulf Shores, Alabama:




Charleston, SC:




Myrtle Beach, SC :




If everthing on the Gulf/lower East Coast died in winter...how can they grow 100 foot palm trees in 6 months - lol.
Well, we are going round and round over this yet you continue to minimize what I have pointed out with weather data and that is that California is warmer than any other area at the same latitude in the U.S. during winter. How do you explain that San Francisco and all coastal California cities have 365-day growing seasons when even Florida can not replicate that until one gets into southern Florida? I know there are palm trees in the South but until one gets into central Florida all those palms are "hardy" because other species can not survive winter. Unlike southern California that has more palm tree varieties [subtropical]. You simply can not cover up the fact that arctic air-masses invade the Southern U.S. each winter and drop temps well below freezing while coastal California rarely even experiences frost. The last time Los Angeles dropped below freezing at night was 1949. The crops that grow here can not grow at the same latitude or even much further south in the Gulf states because it is too cold. I don't consider average winter temps near or slightly above 70F as "cold" and only extreme southern Texas and central Florida have it as warm as southern California yet are hundreds of miles further south. Can you name one U.S. city that has winters as warm as California between 32-38N latitude? You can't because they don't exist. And as I keep pointing out, Southern cities much further south of southern California [Houston, New Orleans, Jacksonville, Tallahassee] are cooler and more prone to sub-freezing temps than even San Francisco. Take a look at the zones for growing crops and you will see that southern California is in the same region as southern Florida because frost and freezing temps are rare anywhere near the ocean and well inland. Only California and Florida [and of-course Hawaii] have USDA zone 10 or 11 regions [not Texas, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, etc]. These zones show what can be grown due to likelihood of frost and cold night temps. Hardiness zone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Why you keep arguing that the South is warmer during winter is silly because it factually is not true. Yes, Houston and New Orleans, etc are mild and not that much cooler than Los Angeles but they are hundreds of miles further south and should be warm but are not near 70F like many areas of California. It is this climate that has drawn people to California; mild to warm winters and cool to warm summers; there's no other state can can boast such a moderate and comfortable climate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top