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View Poll Results: Which Size City Do You Prefer?
Small Metro (200,000 and under) 15 10.42%
Medium Metro (+200,000-600,000) 11 7.64%
Medium/Large Metro (600,000-1.5 million) 27 18.75%
Large Metro (+1.5 million and up) 91 63.19%
Voters: 144. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 09-13-2010, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Macon, GA
1,891 posts, read 3,854,176 times
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Small Metro (200,000 and under)

Medium Metro (+200,000-600,000)

Medium/Large Metro (600,000-1.5 million)

Large Metro (+1.5 million and up)


Ideal for me would be somewhere in between a medium or medium/large metropolitan area.
Perhaps an area of atleast 300,000 or 400,000 people up to around 600,000 or 700,000.
I really cant do very rural areas where malls, sizable shopping centers, and decent healthcare options/hospitals are 15, 20, or even 30+ miles away.

I dont care for the heavy traffic, having TOO many people around, or large/congested ghetto areas that are found in most large metros.

Yes, I'm aware smaller metros can have ghettos too, but being smaller, the bad areas generally arent as compact or "ugly" as in larger cities.

I dont really care for depending on subways or rapid transit systems just to get around, I'd rather drive my own car.

In a medium or medium/large metro, IMO, usually there is enough variation of dining, shopping, and entertainment to my liking. A large metro is going to
have more "top of the line" restaurants and clothing stores, but I dont need that.

The way I look at it, a medium or medium/large metro can offer alot of the same common amenities as large metros,
without the hassle of dealing with as much traffic, as many "uppity/snobbish" people, and less threatening ghettos.
Again, I'm aware this can be found in smaller metros as well, but it's not as extreme usually, IMO.
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Old 11-19-2015, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Macon, GA
1,891 posts, read 3,854,176 times
Reputation: 1707
bump
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Old 11-19-2015, 09:31 AM
 
9,583 posts, read 10,915,282 times
Reputation: 2109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern Soul Bro View Post
Small Metro (200,000 and under)

Medium Metro (+200,000-600,000)

Medium/Large Metro (600,000-1.5 million)

Large Metro (+1.5 million and up)


Ideal for me would be somewhere in between a medium or medium/large metropolitan area.
Perhaps an area of atleast 300,000 or 400,000 people up to around 600,000 or 700,000.
I really cant do very rural areas where malls, sizable shopping centers, and decent healthcare options/hospitals are 15, 20, or even 30+ miles away.

I dont care for the heavy traffic, having TOO many people around, or large/congested ghetto areas that are found in most large metros.

Yes, I'm aware smaller metros can have ghettos too, but being smaller, the bad areas generally arent as compact or "ugly" as in larger cities.

I dont really care for depending on subways or rapid transit systems just to get around, I'd rather drive my own car.

In a medium or medium/large metro, IMO, usually there is enough variation of dining, shopping, and entertainment to my liking. A large metro is going to
have more "top of the line" restaurants and clothing stores, but I dont need that.

The way I look at it, a medium or medium/large metro can offer alot of the same common amenities as large metros,
without the hassle of dealing with as much traffic, as many "uppity/snobbish" people, and less threatening ghettos.
Again, I'm aware this can be found in smaller metros as well, but it's not as extreme usually, IMO.

Seems like your choices need to be adjusted. Under 1 million people would be considered a small metro to most probably. I would say 1-2 million would be considered a medium metro for most people. Having 2-4 million would probably be considered a medium/large metro. Anything bigger than that at +4 million would probably be considered a large metro for most.
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Old 11-19-2015, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
5,783 posts, read 6,335,815 times
Reputation: 3118
^agreed. But it made it very easy for me to vote!
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Old 11-19-2015, 12:42 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 2,574,299 times
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Yeah I'd agree with that on the numbers. 1.5 in the metro is what you need to almost even be able to show up at the party. However, beyond that, it is certainly possible to have a 3 million metro with comparable offerings to that of a 7-8.

I'm not a big traffic guy, so somewhere I wouldn't have to deal with that. I would say at least 1.5, but no more than 4.5 (though I could make exceptions).

I think my ideal living situation would be a small town/urban village set up, within the larger region (think: college town), but yet with it's own things/identity (not basic suburbia). So, in short, a walkable college town, where I could walk/ride my bike to work, that has enough local regional draw to have possibly D-1 sports, but at least a couple museums/historic sites, a main street with local shops/restaurants, a path/body of water to bike/hike (preferably with hills or deciduous trees)/kayak jutting off from the downtown, local community theater/independent movie theater on the main strip. Have that type of a setup, anywhere within 45 minutes of a larger, more prominent city (in that case I suppose doesn't matter the size), with more offerings. I know that's picky, but that's my ideal lol.
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Old 11-20-2015, 10:58 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,765 posts, read 1,976,827 times
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I live in a city with a metro of around 700,000. Big enough to offer what we need from emergency medical services, respectable shopping and nice restaurants, to a good selection of various indoor and outdoor activities.

We are also within an 1-1/2 hour drive of Metro Denver, with 4 major sports teams, museums, concerts, elegant restaurants, and an international airport.

Seem to have the best of both worlds. What I appreciate about living in a city our size is less traffic congestion, cleaner air, a lower COL and access to all our necessities within a 30 minute drive.

Life for us here is pretty good!

Last edited by Kar54; 11-20-2015 at 11:09 AM..
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Old 11-20-2015, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,504 posts, read 2,727,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Seems like your choices need to be adjusted. Under 1 million people would be considered a small metro to most probably. I would say 1-2 million would be considered a medium metro for most people. Having 2-4 million would probably be considered a medium/large metro. Anything bigger than that at +4 million would probably be considered a large metro for most.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Yeah I'd agree with that on the numbers. 1.5 in the metro is what you need to almost even be able to show up at the party. However, beyond that, it is certainly possible to have a 3 million metro with comparable offerings to that of a 7-8.

I'm not a big traffic guy, so somewhere I wouldn't have to deal with that. I would say at least 1.5, but no more than 4.5 (though I could make exceptions).

I think my ideal living situation would be a small town/urban village set up, within the larger region (think: college town), but yet with it's own things/identity (not basic suburbia). So, in short, a walkable college town, where I could walk/ride my bike to work, that has enough local regional draw to have possibly D-1 sports, but at least a couple museums/historic sites, a main street with local shops/restaurants, a path/body of water to bike/hike (preferably with hills or deciduous trees)/kayak jutting off from the downtown, local community theater/independent movie theater on the main strip. Have that type of a setup, anywhere within 45 minutes of a larger, more prominent city (in that case I suppose doesn't matter the size), with more offerings. I know that's picky, but that's my ideal lol.
I'll have to go ahead and respectfully disagree on what would be considered a small/medium metro to many. If you calculate the percentage of people living in metros over 1.5 million people (based on MSAs and not CSAs, though that *should* equate the same number), you'll come up with roughly 48% of America living in them. This means it's close, but more people probably live in metros UNDER 1.5 million than over (could be a dead heat, honestly). And half of people live in a city proper themselves of under 50,000 (though this probably includes suburbs/satellite cities). I think there's a significant percentage of people who would consider ANY metro over 1 million to be medium/quite large, and even 500,000 plus to be significant. 82% of the nation might live in urban areas, but it might be a slim majority at best of people who live in metros that "can show up to the party". Not saying you're wrong or that I'm right (this is highly subjective, afterall), just adding some food for thought.

Other than that, I agree with some metros being able to offer offerings comparable to metros twice their size. I also agree with your ideal living situation; it's one of the main reasons I moved back to Delaware from NYC/Miami. Plenty of stuff to do for when you stay local at a fraction of the cost, yet offers easy access to a much larger city for when you need to go big

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...tistical_Areas
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Old 11-20-2015, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Washington State
15,349 posts, read 8,020,336 times
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I prefer a large city and have lived in Moscow, Beijing, Shanghai, Seoul, and Dubai to name a few. Unfortunately my wife prefers rural.
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Old 11-20-2015, 02:06 PM
 
52,610 posts, read 75,426,573 times
Reputation: 11626
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Yeah I'd agree with that on the numbers. 1.5 in the metro is what you need to almost even be able to show up at the party. However, beyond that, it is certainly possible to have a 3 million metro with comparable offerings to that of a 7-8.

I'm not a big traffic guy, so somewhere I wouldn't have to deal with that. I would say at least 1.5, but no more than 4.5 (though I could make exceptions).

I think my ideal living situation would be a small town/urban village set up, within the larger region (think: college town), but yet with it's own things/identity (not basic suburbia). So, in short, a walkable college town, where I could walk/ride my bike to work, that has enough local regional draw to have possibly D-1 sports, but at least a couple museums/historic sites, a main street with local shops/restaurants, a path/body of water to bike/hike (preferably with hills or deciduous trees)/kayak jutting off from the downtown, local community theater/independent movie theater on the main strip. Have that type of a setup, anywhere within 45 minutes of a larger, more prominent city (in that case I suppose doesn't matter the size), with more offerings. I know that's picky, but that's my ideal lol.
There are smaller metros that offer most, if not everything you mentioned in this portion of the post.
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Old 11-21-2015, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Macon, GA
1,891 posts, read 3,854,176 times
Reputation: 1707
Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
I'll have to go ahead and respectfully disagree on what would be considered a small/medium metro to many. If you calculate the percentage of people living in metros over 1.5 million people (based on MSAs and not CSAs, though that *should* equate the same number), you'll come up with roughly 48% of America living in them. This means it's close, but more people probably live in metros UNDER 1.5 million than over (could be a dead heat, honestly). And half of people live in a city proper themselves of under 50,000 (though this probably includes suburbs/satellite cities). I think there's a significant percentage of people who would consider ANY metro over 1 million to be medium/quite large, and even 500,000 plus to be significant. 82% of the nation might live in urban areas, but it might be a slim majority at best of people who live in metros that "can show up to the party". Not saying you're wrong or that I'm right (this is highly subjective, afterall), just adding some food for thought.

Other than that, I agree with some metros being able to offer offerings comparable to metros twice their size. I also agree with your ideal living situation; it's one of the main reasons I moved back to Delaware from NYC/Miami. Plenty of stuff to do for when you stay local at a fraction of the cost, yet offers easy access to a much larger city for when you need to go big

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...tistical_Areas

I agree with this. As said though, nobody is right or wrong, it's all subjective. Having lived in Macon (GA), Huntsville (AL), and Columbus (GA), I never considered them big cities, but not exactly small either. To us, anywhere the size of Memphis or Nashville is a "big city" though we know not on the level of an Atlanta or Houston.

If one even looks at that list of all 381 Metro areas, the ones between 200,000-300,000 are basically in the middle of the pack population wise.

400,000-600,000 is actually in the top half.

A city like Tulsa is 55th out of 381 metro areas, with a metro pop of 969,000. I just cant think of that as a "small metro"
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