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View Poll Results: Cincinnati vs. Atlanta
Cincinnati 48 36.36%
Atlanta 84 63.64%
Voters: 132. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 10-07-2010, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,094 posts, read 2,946,454 times
Reputation: 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Probably because Houston' and Dallas' sprawl is like dense clusters of single family housing and strip malls that repeat themselves over an over, whereas Atlanta's sprawl is literally spread out over the same distance or more. Even though I prefer one over the other, it's still sprawl at the end of the day. Cincinnati appears to be almost as spread out as Atlanta though, so the argument between the two might as well be void.
The city proper of Cincinnati is 52 neighborhoods, most of which have a small commercial district. Cincinnati is more of a unification of neighborhoods than a single city. Each business district is surrounded by housing until you get to the next neighborhood business district. Sometimes there is a park or green space to serve as a buffer. Cincinnati is the only place I know where literally everyone you ask will be able to tell you absolutely immediately what neighborhood they live in. The city proper is architecturally and in terms of urban form is as dense as any american city.

I don't know Atlanta that well but have always enjoyed my visits.

Here are some pictures of Cincinnati. Most people haven't been here but urban types are never disappointed
Attached Thumbnails
Cincinnati vs. Atlanta-columbiatusculum02.jpg   Cincinnati vs. Atlanta-columbiatusculum03.jpg   Cincinnati vs. Atlanta-prospect-hill-1.jpg   Cincinnati vs. Atlanta-prospect-hill-2.jpg   Cincinnati vs. Atlanta-east-walnut-hills.jpg  

Cincinnati vs. Atlanta-northside1.jpg   Cincinnati vs. Atlanta-hyde-park-square.jpg  

 
Old 10-07-2010, 11:48 AM
 
7,852 posts, read 11,964,061 times
Reputation: 2590
Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
The city proper of Cincinnati is 52 neighborhoods, most of which have a small commercial district. Cincinnati is more of a unification of neighborhoods than a single city. Each business district is surrounded by housing until you get to the next neighborhood business district. Sometimes there is a park or green space to serve as a buffer. Cincinnati is the only place I know where literally everyone you ask will be able to tell you absolutely immediately what neighborhood they live in. The city proper is architecturally and in terms of urban form is as dense as any american city.

I don't know Atlanta that well but have always enjoyed my visits.

Here are some pictures of Cincinnati. Most people haven't been here but urban types are never disappointed
Excellent post and beautiful photos of Cincinnati! Thanks!
 
Old 10-07-2010, 11:56 AM
 
7,852 posts, read 11,964,061 times
Reputation: 2590
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrStrawhat View Post
That aint the Houston I've been too. The suburbs of ATL aren't just one big spread either; each city in the metro area more or less has its own downtown and fullsize mall/shopping area. Have you been to Douglasville, Northcross, Lawrenceville, or Dunwoody for example? Each of those suburban cities in ATL's metro have their own distinct dense downtown areas and shopping centers.
Very true...much like progmac's description of Cincinnati, metro Atlanta is a collection of incorporated and unincorporated cities/towns that have their own square/town center surrounded by residential and commercial areas. Some are very historic...like Decatur, Marietta, East Point, Duluth, College Park, Fayetteville, Vinings, etc, etc, etc. These are lovely little towns - and not the suburban hell that so many seem to equate with Atlanta.

Within the city of Atlanta it's a similar setup...neighborhoods with a commercial area surrounded by residential: Virginia-Highland, Little 5 Points, Midtown, Cabbagetown, Peachtree Hills, etc, etc, etc - gorgeous residential with a central, thriving commercial area (often historic at that).
 
Old 10-07-2010, 12:01 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,236 posts, read 5,448,801 times
Reputation: 1304
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrStrawhat View Post
That aint the Houston I've been too. The suburbs of ATL aren't just one big spread either; each city in the metro area more or less has its own downtown and fullsize mall/shopping area. Have you been to Douglasville, Northcross, Lawrenceville, or Dunwoody for example? Each of those suburban cities in ATL's metro have their own distinct dense downtown areas and shopping centers.
I think you missed my point.
Drive an equal distance in both cities and compare the development you encounter. Look at devlopment inside BW8 and inside I-285.

Last edited by WestbankNOLA; 10-07-2010 at 12:14 PM..
 
Old 10-07-2010, 12:05 PM
 
7,852 posts, read 11,964,061 times
Reputation: 2590
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
I think you missed my point.
Drive an equal distance in both cities and compare the development you encounter.
I have done so in both cities...what am I supposed to come up with from it? I don't recall a significant difference when comparing development in Houston to development in Atlanta.

Now comparing Houston to Boston or Atlanta to Philadelphia there is a significant difference in the type of development you encounter as you go further out of the downtown core, but I don't see much difference in Houston and Atlanta.
 
Old 10-07-2010, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,080 posts, read 13,572,641 times
Reputation: 4810
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrStrawhat View Post
That aint the Houston I've been too.
Then I don't know what Houston you been to because WestbankNola is telling the truth. Most of the homes are on much smaller lots than cities to the east and the suburbs, while still suburban sprawl, is more dense than the cities to the East.
 
Old 10-07-2010, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,080 posts, read 13,572,641 times
Reputation: 4810
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
I have done so in both cities...what am I supposed to come up with from it? I don't recall a significant difference when comparing development in Houston to development in Atlanta.

Now comparing Houston to Boston or Atlanta to Philadelphia there is a significant difference in the type of development you encounter as you go further out of the downtown core, but I don't see much difference in Houston and Atlanta.
The only difference is that Houston's suburbs are more clustered or compact while Atlanta gives you more space and room. Both are endless suburban sprawl though. But that difference as far as being built is pretty evident. I would say Atlanta's suburban sprawl reminds me very much of DC's suburban sprawl. Houston's sprawl reminds me of Chicago's sprawl.

In the end though. Sprawl is sprawl. I didn't see much of Cincinnati's sprawl though outside of Northern Kentucky.
 
Old 10-07-2010, 12:17 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,236 posts, read 5,448,801 times
Reputation: 1304
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
I have done so in both cities...what am I supposed to come up with from it? I don't recall a significant difference when comparing development in Houston to development in Atlanta.

Now comparing Houston to Boston or Atlanta to Philadelphia there is a significant difference in the type of development you encounter as you go further out of the downtown core, but I don't see much difference in Houston and Atlanta.
Look at the development inside of BW8 and then compare it to that inside I-285.
There's even a difference outside of the Perimeter and Beltway, although not as big. Everything from downtown, to the loop, and out to the beltway in Houston more or less repeats itself over and over and over. Atlanta, not so much. With your argument you can argue that the suburbs of South Florida, Phoenix, and South California are developed like Atlanta.

On that note, suburban Atlanta would probably be more like the suburban Northeast in terms of development then it would be to suburban Texas.
 
Old 10-07-2010, 12:24 PM
 
7,852 posts, read 11,964,061 times
Reputation: 2590
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Look at the development inside of BW8 and then compare it to that inside I-285.
There's even a difference outside of the Perimeter and Beltway, although not as big. Everything from the loop to beltway in Houston repeats itself over and over and over. Atlanta, not so much. With your argument you can argue that the suburbs of South Florida, Phoenix, and South California are developed like Atlanta.

On that note, suburban Atlanta would probably be more like the suburban Northeast in terms of development then it would be to suburban Texas.
I probably wasn't taking notes the times that I've driven around Houston...I wasn't looking for subtle variances and I wasn't really comparing it to Atlanta, so I just don't remember significant differences in terms of development when compared to Atlanta like I noticed in cities like Boston.
 
Old 10-07-2010, 12:33 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,236 posts, read 5,448,801 times
Reputation: 1304
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
I probably wasn't taking notes the times that I've driven around Houston...I wasn't looking for subtle variances and I wasn't really comparing it to Atlanta, so I just don't remember significant differences in terms of development when compared to Atlanta like I noticed in cities like Boston.
You actually think that suburban Houston to suburban Atlanta is subtle, but suburban Boston to be a significant difference. Maybe the transition between the city and the suburbs, but that's about it. In that case Cincinnati vs Atlanta is just as significant.

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