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View Poll Results: Which city is the capital of Black America in your opinion?
NYC Area 59 4.88%
Phil 22 1.82%
DC 115 9.52%
Atlanta 717 59.35%
Memphis 18 1.49%
New ORleans 31 2.57%
Houston 24 1.99%
Seattle 12 0.99%
Chicago 29 2.40%
Detroit 79 6.54%
Other (include in your reply) 13 1.08%
There is none. 89 7.37%
Voters: 1208. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-02-2012, 04:12 PM
 
3,453 posts, read 3,436,497 times
Reputation: 1673

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College educated African Americans migrate to southern cities | www.AlumniRoundup.com
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Old 04-02-2012, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
29,994 posts, read 29,688,204 times
Reputation: 13039
What's the Atlanta equivalent of Benjamin Banneker Senior High School?

Forward to http://benjaminbanneker.k12.dc.us
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Old 04-02-2012, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
3,719 posts, read 6,588,795 times
Reputation: 1687
Yeah right my mother is black and to this day she says she will never go back to the south. She stays in the north especially in Chicago!
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Old 04-02-2012, 05:29 PM
 
35,815 posts, read 33,844,182 times
Reputation: 23830
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonathancalderon71 View Post
Yeah right my mother is black and to this day she says she will never go back to the south. She stays in the north especially in Chicago!
I can't tell you how many times I've heard stories of older Black folks saying this until they actually come back to visit and wind up moving back South (although it may not be back to their original hometown, but one of the larger metro areas). It's really unbelievable how outdated some people's perceptions of the South are, even when it comes to places that were historically known to be especially bad for Blacks.

Chicago's Great Migration: Blacks Leaving Historic Neighborhoods To Return South
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:49 AM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
8,092 posts, read 13,180,105 times
Reputation: 6205
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
What's the Atlanta equivalent of Benjamin Banneker Senior High School?

Forward to http://benjaminbanneker.k12.dc.us
Historically Booker T. Washington High School (it is still open, but no longer academically strong since it serves mainly lower income neighborhoods)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washing...anta,_Georgia))

In modern times, Benjamin E. Mays High School (serves mainly middle and upper middle class neighborhoods)
Benjamin Elijah Mays High School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by waronxmas; 04-03-2012 at 10:22 AM..
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:22 AM
 
120 posts, read 191,291 times
Reputation: 92
The answer is Atlanta.

/thread.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:51 AM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
8,092 posts, read 13,180,105 times
Reputation: 6205
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
It's amazing to me how ignorant you seem to be. I have stated nothing but things you also agree with and I have not disagreed with anything you have said.

This is what I have said:

-D.C. is more urban than Atlanta
-New York is more urban than DC
-Black people do chose to live in the suburbs more often than not
-An urban or suburban built environment is not the primary reason many people use when deciding on a home
-Black people moving to Atlanta and DC are doing so for reason's other than the built environment more often than not

Now.......
I have two recent experiences that clash (and compliment) above post. While one can go on all day about what constitutions a place being more (or less) "urban", you I think use it in the incorrect way. The word you are really looking for is compact. And, yes, it doesn't take a genius to know that DC is in fact more compact than Atlanta. DC is 2.5 more compact residentially than Atlanta.

However, just stating that alone doesn't really mean much since both cities became big during the same era and (at least in the central parts of old Atlanta) play heavily from the same styles and layouts of residential neighborhoods. They also both have good modern subway coverage in the central city that snakes through the major business districts and residential neighborhoods. In some ways they best each other with certain things like DC's blocks upon blocks of terraced housing, or with Atlanta's high rise apartments and large residential apartment blocks. To say one is defined more urban though seems odd to me because I don't think either really beat each other out.

This comes to second thing I have a problem with which is the above comparison of how Atlanta is to DC in how DC is to NYC. Respectfully, nothing more ridiculous could be written. While there is difference in residential density of 2.5 between Atlanta and DC, Manhattan is 7 times more compact than DC in residential density. That is not a trivial difference and not at all comparable to the difference between DC and Atlanta. Basically what I'm saying is that it is fair and true to say that DC is more compact (and even better designed and laid out) than Atlanta, but this "more urban" nonsense is exactly that.

This two points do make an odd confluence in two ways though. I was recently in NYC visiting family when I had an interesting conversation with my aunt, who relocated to suburban DC a few years ago, that went like this (in the deepest Queens accent you can imagine):

Aunt: I can't stand Virginia!

Me: Why, I thought it's nice there and you have a big house now?

Aunt: Oh it is nice, and I do love my new big house.

Me: So what's the problem?

Aunt: The people! They say things like "people down South are county and backwards" and try to act like they live in the North. {laughs to herself}

Me: Yeah, I've heard that a few times.

Aunt: Well it's stupid. Do they even hear themselves when they speak?


In short, you can call Atlanta country all you want, but from outside the DC area people say the same thing about you (it's not right either).

I 100% agree with your assessment of where black folks are moving to in DC and Atlanta both: the suburbs. My aunt did it, and literally millions of others over the last few decades. DC and Atlanta need to do a better job at making the city proper appealing to low income (but hard working) and middle class black families. A lot of poor and middle income black folks are moving to the burbs because they can't afford to live in the city or have the other lifestyle options they want like better schools or grocery stores in neighborhoods that aren't broke down corner stores. Both issues though I think are being addressed by current city leadership in both cities through various initiatives.

Disclaimer: The above story isn't an indignation of all DC residents. There is a distinct sense of pride there of the city itself that those residents do not try to attach to "the North" like they are part of it. It just really irks me when I hear from a shirtless, yuck mouth, yokel from DC or "Virginny".

Disclaimer: I am not insinuating that MDAllstar is a shirtless, yuck mouth, yokel from DC or "Virginny".

Last edited by waronxmas; 04-03-2012 at 12:02 PM..
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Old 04-03-2012, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
29,994 posts, read 29,688,204 times
Reputation: 13039
I'm really surprised the poll is so lopsided considering DC has so many institutions (or organizations headquartered there):

Howard University
Congressional Black Caucus Institute
National Association of Black Journalists
National Medical Association
National Bar Association
National Society of Black Engineers
Student National Medical Association
National Black Law Students Association
NAACP (DC/Baltimore)
Alpha Phi Alpha
The Links
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Old 04-03-2012, 12:28 PM
 
Location: London, U.K.
886 posts, read 1,426,910 times
Reputation: 823
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
Post of the year. "dc is dixie."
Listen up southerner, D.C. is in the south. Dont ever claim the northeast again. Try visiting Philly, NYC, Boston and experiencing the real northeast before you try to say you share cultures with us
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Old 04-03-2012, 12:36 PM
 
11,051 posts, read 12,773,021 times
Reputation: 2901
Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
I have two recent experiences that clash (and compliment) above post. While one can go on all day about what constitutions a place being more (or less) "urban", you I think use it in the incorrect way. The word you are really looking for is compact. And, yes, it doesn't take a genius to know that DC is in fact more compact than Atlanta. DC is 2.5 more compact residentially than Atlanta.

However, just stating that alone doesn't really mean much since both cities became big during the same era and (at least in the central parts of old Atlanta) play heavily from the same styles and layouts of residential neighborhoods. They also both have good modern subway coverage in the central city that snakes through the major business districts and residential neighborhoods. In some ways they best each other with certain things like DC's blocks upon blocks of terraced housing, or with Atlanta's high rise apartments and large residential apartment blocks. To say one is defined more urban though seems odd to me because I don't think either really beat each other out.

This comes to second thing I have a problem with which is the above comparison of how Atlanta is to DC in how DC is to NYC. Respectfully, nothing more ridiculous could be written. While there is difference in residential density of 2.5 between Atlanta and DC, Manhattan is 7 times more compact than DC in residential density. That is not a trivial difference and not at all comparable to the difference between DC and Atlanta. Basically what I'm saying is that it is fair and true to say that DC is more compact (and even better designed and laid out) than Atlanta, but this "more urban" nonsense is exactly that.

This two points do make an odd confluence in two ways though. I was recently in NYC visiting family when I had an interesting conversation with my aunt, who relocated to suburban DC a few years ago, that went like this (in the deepest Queens accent you can imagine):

Aunt: I can't stand Virginia!

Me: Why, I thought it's nice there and you have a big house now?

Aunt: Oh it is nice, and I do love my new big house.

Me: So what's the problem?

Aunt: The people! They say things like "people down South are county and backwards" and try to act like they live in the North. {laughs to herself}

Me: Yeah, I've heard that a few times.

Aunt: Well it's stupid. Do they even hear themselves when they speak?


In short, you can call Atlanta country all you want, but from outside the DC area people say the same thing about you (it's not right either).

I 100% agree with your assessment of where black folks are moving to in DC and Atlanta both: the suburbs. My aunt did it, and literally millions of others over the last few decades. DC and Atlanta need to do a better job at making the city proper appealing to low income (but hard working) and middle class black families. A lot of poor and middle income black folks are moving to the burbs because they can't afford to live in the city or have the other lifestyle options they want like better schools or grocery stores in neighborhoods that aren't broke down corner stores. Both issues though I think are being addressed by current city leadership in both cities through various initiatives.

Disclaimer: The above story isn't an indignation of all DC residents. There is a distinct sense of pride there of the city itself that those residents do not try to attach to "the North" like they are part of it. It just really irks me when I hear from a shirtless, yuck mouth, yokel from DC or "Virginny".

Disclaimer: I am not insinuating that MDAllstar is a shirtless, yuck mouth, yokel from DC or "Virginny".
Ummm...couple things

Urban means compact. That is the definition of urban so I don't know what you are talking about.

Also, we are talking about the built environment here, not the population density. The built environment density in DC compared to Atlanta is about the same as Manhattan to DC. The built environment in DC is pulling away from Atlanta at hyper speed right not also with an infill construction percentage that leads the nation. There is absolutely no comparison with DC proper housing and Atlanta. Also, the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor has a denser built environment than Midtown ATL and DC proper runs circles around Arlington in building density. This is really apples and oranges.

Last but not least, I didn't make a comparison of NYC to DC, that was someone else. Because you didnt read this thread, you drew the conclusion that I said Newyork is to DC as DC is to Atlanta. Never happened!
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