U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Would you say there is a special serenity you can only get from cities/metros with coasts that you c
Yes 33 61.11%
No 13 24.07%
Never thought about it before 7 12.96%
Other Option 1 1.85%
Voters: 54. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-22-2010, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 11,674,060 times
Reputation: 4047

Advertisements

Is there a special serenity you get from Coastal Cities or cities in coastal metropolitan areas that just isn't available in a landlocked metropolitan area?

I've always thought so, coming from Chicago you would think "landlocked" but it just doesn't function that way, Lake Michigan feels like a large sea and it adds more to Chicago's atmosphere. Los Angeles has a coastline in its Metropolitan Area, same with Houston, New York City, of course Miami, San Diego, Boston, Seattle, and so on.

Would you say cities/Metros with coastlines have a special case of serenity that make them more calm than the kind of atmosphere you would find in a landlocked city/metro?

^ I know my poll wording looks a bit messed up but my question was too long top fit it in, but its the same question above in bold. Please answer that and you are welcome to share pictures of your argument, its more than appreciated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,523 posts, read 21,716,143 times
Reputation: 4890
I love being able to live near a coastline...that's what I miss most about living in Houston, my second home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
2,121 posts, read 7,293,693 times
Reputation: 2763
Hmm, I have never heard anyone describe the Los Angeles or Orange County metro areas as serene or calm. It can be relaxing to stroll along the mostly empty beach in the quiet early morning or evening hours. The hustle and chaos of the urban jungle seems a long ways off, even though the lights of the city light up the sky all night long and don't let you see the stars very well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 11,674,060 times
Reputation: 4047
In my personal opinion, I also love being near the coast. The times you actually go to the coastline or the beach can be the most relaxed time of your week if you let it be.

There is just something special about something like this:


When people try these, they'll know what I mean:
- Play catch with a football among friends at the beach
- Walk on the beach, especially when you take someone you like spending time with
- Look at the sunset and its absolutely beautiful how it looks to diminish before the water
- Take a drive along the coastline, its wonderful seeing the water and the beaches and the calm atmosphere you get from that adds to it
- Try walking on clear white sand beaches, and letting that warm and relaxed sand just take over and massage your feet as you walk on the waterline

I know beaches and coasts aren't for everybody, many people I know don't care for it, but I feel like a metropolitan area that has it has a little more serenity. Chicago has a great setting, and its a very fortunate city, and is often a special case in this regard in that Lake Michigan is large enough for beaches to exist, and large enough to function like a coastline. I never go to the beach to go in the water for a swim or anything but to instead take advantage of the setting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:37 PM
 
301 posts, read 532,519 times
Reputation: 185
it is one of the main reasons that NY is complete, it has coastline for those that like. NY truly lacks in nothing. but to answer your question yes there is something unique about places with coasts that land trapped cities cant ever have
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:42 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 23,101,798 times
Reputation: 5579
Yes definitely, and in any other country the Great Lakes would be Seas.

But even inland cities can make good use of the water.

Chicago...

but also

Geneva, CH




istanbul



dubai

but yeah, i go run, bike by the lake, take my dog to play on the beach, etc...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:51 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,442,108 times
Reputation: 2698
Not necessarily. Cities in the mountains can give off a certain calmness and serenity as well.

Asheville, NC
http://ashevillebuyer.com/images/asheville.jpg (broken link)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:52 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 23,101,798 times
Reputation: 5579
I spent about 10 years of my life living literally on the beach so can't imagine not being by a large body of water. I don't think Lake Michigan is a replacement for the ocean, but Chicago does a good job of using it. I've never lived more than 20 miles away from the ocean or in Chicago case lake michigan. On mountains I'm not too big on anything over about 6000 feet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 11,674,060 times
Reputation: 4047
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Yes definitely, and in any other country the Great Lakes would be Seas.

But even inland cities can make good use of the water.

Chicago...

but also

Geneva, CH
You made a good point earlier, inland cities have to make themselves attractive to appeal to people more than any coastal city has to. Coastal cities & cities with great topography in general always have the edge.

Cities like Chicago that are blessed enough with a massive sea like setting have to make the right choice to make it more beautiful. And Chicago has done exactly that:






Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 11,674,060 times
Reputation: 4047
Houston Metropolitan Area:

Miami Metropolitan Area:

Los Angeles Metropolitan Area:

Honolulu Metropolitan Area:

The best of them all-
Big Sur, California:
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top