U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-14-2012, 04:45 PM
 
3,193 posts, read 5,219,574 times
Reputation: 989

Advertisements

I automatically thought of Hudson County as NYC's 6th borough; the entire place could fit in perfectly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-14-2012, 04:57 PM
 
Location: In the heights
20,428 posts, read 21,979,457 times
Reputation: 10419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilovethecommunity View Post
Isn't Queens mostly suburban?
The far eastern part is mostly suburban, but much of Queens is very urban.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2012, 05:01 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,253 posts, read 2,467,741 times
Reputation: 1557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilovethecommunity View Post
Isn't Queens mostly suburban?
Yes, mostly suburban. At an average density of 21,000/sq mile.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2012, 07:29 PM
 
1,953 posts, read 3,153,453 times
Reputation: 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzrovian View Post
Yes, mostly suburban. At an average density of 21,000/sq mile.
Not sure if you are being sarcastic or not, but I don't see any conflict between the two parts of this statement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2012, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 17,820,080 times
Reputation: 2617
i've said it before = hudson co

i thought i'd expand since america thinks new jersey being a different state
and all should be 1000 miles away w/mountains

ny___rockies____hudson river____mississipi river_____texas__nj
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2012, 10:13 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,389,870 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
Not sure if you are being sarcastic or not, but I don't see any conflict between the two parts of this statement.
How could a mostly suburban area have an average density of 21,000 per square mile?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2012, 10:18 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,253 posts, read 2,467,741 times
Reputation: 1557
Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
Not sure if you are being sarcastic or not, but I don't see any conflict between the two parts of this statement.
Okay, then let me explain. At 21k/sq mile Queens - if it were an independent city - would be by far the densest large city in the country (not counting NYC itself). More dense than San Francisco. That's how dense that is. If Queens could be mostly suburban then places like Philadelphia (11k/sq mile) or Essex County, NJ (6k/sq mile) would have to be mostly rural. You don't see any conflict there?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2012, 11:34 PM
 
1,953 posts, read 3,153,453 times
Reputation: 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzrovian View Post
Okay, then let me explain. At 21k/sq mile Queens - if it were an independent city - would be by far the densest large city in the country (not counting NYC itself). More dense than San Francisco. That's how dense that is. If Queens could be mostly suburban then places like Philadelphia (11k/sq mile) or Essex County, NJ (6k/sq mile) would have to be mostly rural. You don't see any conflict there?
Well, "suburban" can refer to two things. It can mean either an area's relationship in comparison to its surroundings, or a style of urban development. Granted, I don't know Queens that well (the only parts of the borough I know pretty well are Maspeth and Jackson Heights), but as far as the first meaning goes, Queens definitely fits the definition of a suburb (for Manhattan), although I have no doubt it has many strong commercial centers of its own.

As far as the second meaning goes, a significant portion of Queens, at least that I have seen, consists of single family homes on small lots, which also fits the definition of suburban in my opinion. Granted, it may not be the cookie-cutter sprawl we think of when we hear the word "suburb," but it is still leans more towards suburban on an urban-suburban-rural continuum.

So overall, no I don't really see too much of a conflict. The argument for the first definition is stronger than for the second, but both are valid. When I originally said I see no conflict with your statement, I was primarily referring to the first argument. A city can have suburban qualities, even if that seems counter-intuitive.

Last edited by soug; 02-15-2012 at 12:05 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2012, 07:52 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,844 posts, read 9,448,845 times
Reputation: 6096
Thumbs up urban-suburban-rural continuum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
Well, "suburban" can refer to two things. It can mean either an area's relationship in comparison to its surroundings, or a style of urban development. Granted, I don't know Queens that well (the only parts of the borough I know pretty well are Maspeth and Jackson Heights), but as far as the first meaning goes, Queens definitely fits the definition of a suburb (for Manhattan), although I have no doubt it has many strong commercial centers of its own.

As far as the second meaning goes, a significant portion of Queens, at least that I have seen, consists of single family homes on small lots, which also fits the definition of suburban in my opinion. Granted, it may not be the cookie-cutter sprawl we think of when we hear the word "suburb," but it is still leans more towards suburban on an urban-suburban-rural continuum.
So overall, no I don't really see too much of a conflict. The argument for the first definition is stronger than for the second, but both are valid. When I originally said I see no conflict with your statement, I was primarily referring to the first argument. A city can have suburban qualities, even if that seems counter-intuitive.
Queens may look suburban when compared to Manhattan. But alot of what you are describing is not so much suburban but residential. Jackson Heights for instance, is very heavily built up with apartment buildings.

Queens does have a strong economic base, and growing. Again, its not Manhattan or even Brooklyn. But the former town centers of Flushing and Jamaica have grown into major downtown areas (Downtown Flushing and Jamaica Center). In the Elmhurst-Rego Park area (the old town seat of the former Newtown) the Queens Center Mall and some other malls are some of the busiest in the country. Long Island City is also built up economically but is more industrial. And there is alot of business activity outside JFK airport and to a lesser extent Laguardia.

Having said all that, I agree with you. While many parts of Queens are urban, others are pretty suburban, Bayside, Whitestone, Cambria Heights, Springfield Gardens, Howard Beach etc. Others may be considered semi-suburban. Still others, like Forest Hills, maybe a mixture of suburban, semi-suburban and urban all in one community.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2012, 08:21 AM
 
Location: NY, NY
1,190 posts, read 1,397,610 times
Reputation: 1179
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIslandPerson View Post
Nassau would not be a good candidate. Even the two densest towns in Nassau (Hempstead and Freeport) are very suburban in nature outside of their relatively small size downtowns.

Westchester would make a much better candidate since there are many parts in the county that are city-like (Yonkers, White Plains, New Rochelle, etc) but it still wouldn't make as good of a candidate as Hudson County would.
Actually Nassau County is the best choice since it was part of Queens until 1898. Nassau would be part of NYC had it not seceded from Queens when the Greater New York City area was established with the mergining of Brooklyn, Queens, NY, and Staten Island.

Also, Nassau County uses an extension of the NYC sewer system and IMO, Eastern Queens and Western Nassau do not look that different too me although Nassau is more suburban, its no more suburban then Staten Island.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top