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Old 12-23-2010, 06:12 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,752,622 times
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Detroit city is pretty wasted for a metro area that size. I should note that quite a bit of this seems to be from a very aggressive urban renewal effort, so the city lost most of those older close-in neighborhoods that you'd see elsewhere (for Cleveland, this would be areas equivilant to, say, Ohio City)..

Beyond that you have those half-abanodned neighborhoods, like the ones along St Aubin Street or the area the Heidelberg Project is in.

Getting closer to the city limits things are more intact (thinking here of the Springwells area and Palmer Park)
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Old 12-23-2010, 07:59 AM
 
787 posts, read 1,423,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohio248 View Post
Um, unless you're from NYC, SF, LA, or DC, Detroit is hardly "insular, provincial and small-time".

I'm a fierce critic of Detroit, but one can't deny its one of the dozen or so biggest, richest and most powerful U.S. metros.

Just off the top of the list, it's second in the Midwest to Chicago in population, economy, immigration and wealth.

It has a top 10 orchestra, opera and art museum.

It has some of the largest companies on the planet.

It has the fourth richest city in the country (Bloomfield Hills).

It has a musical heritage second to none.

It has arguably the best airport in the U.S.

Yes, Detroit has HUGE problems, but if you think Detroit is "provincial and small time", I can't imagine what you think about an Indy, a Charlotte, or a Kansas City.


So you can defend Detroit with (valid) points, but you heavily criticize other cities with less problems, such as Chicago?

LOL..."Detroit248"
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Old 12-23-2010, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,541,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Beyond that you have those half-abanodned neighborhoods, like the ones along St Aubin Street or the area the Heidelberg Project is in.

Getting closer to the city limits things are more intact (thinking here of the Springwells area and Palmer Park)
Show me one of the country's 20 largest cities with a fully intact inner city. Chances are, one doesn't exist. Its not just limited to Detroit.
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Old 12-23-2010, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,782 posts, read 7,343,913 times
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I've been thinking about the word "dead" in this context. Those of us who live in "dead" cities are a bit offended because the media seems to be using the word in the same way you'd describe a corpse; "that city is devoid of life--now look at these pictures of abandoned buildings and weedy lots." But, I'm guessing the people in this thread who don't seem to understand why we're offended, are using the word "dead" in the same way you'd describe a small party, or an uncrowded restaurant/nightclub.

In college, I've been to frat parties that were standing room only, and you had to shout in your friend's ear so they could hear what you were trying to say. But, I find the friendly get-together, where everyone has a seat and you don't have to raise your voice to have a good conversation, to be much more enjoyable. I've never been to NYC or Chicago, but I'm honestly not sure if I'd like dealing with huge crowds of people on a daily basis.

Judging by the amount of suburbia in the U.S., I'd guess many Americans feel the same way. Unfortunately, they wouldn't know how good it can be living in a "dead" city, because they are scared away by the media's fixation on crime, blight, and abandonment.
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Old 12-23-2010, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Area, Michigan
1,107 posts, read 2,635,297 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
I wrote in another thread about how defensive people in Detroit are about their town and DetroitLove seems to be exhibit A.

Whether you want to consider Detroit dead, dying, declining, or more politely “past its prime,” it’s clear that Motown is one of the most screwed-up cities in the U.S. and anyone who can’t admit that is living in a state of denial.

And yes, I lived there for two years so I know the place. As my wife said, “Those were the longest two years of our lives.”

What makes the city so bad off and its defenders so seemingly oblivious? I don’t know for sure, but I suspect one reason is that so few Detroiters have ever left Detroit. When I lived there in the mid-1990s I was told that D had one of the lowest rates of in- or out- migration of any big city. That is, people who were born there, stayed there, and nobody came in. (Mind you I’m talking about the city now, not the metro area.).

That explains to me why the city seems so incredibly insular, provincial and small-time. Too many people in Detroit are happy to be there and proud of Detroit! Puh-leese. If they’d ever spent a few months living in a functional city they’d be smart enough to be embarrassed about the place. Hardly anyone knows what a functional big city is supposed to be. Detroiters are happy to sit in that dump of a city with massively dysfunctional schools, a string of corrupt politicians, thousands of abandoned buildings and empty lots, and virtually non-existent public transit. In fact, Motown has virtually nothing a functional city needs to do well. It can’t survive off of a few casinos, a new ballpark, one big downtown company (Compuware) and a few summer street festivals.

For the first month I lived in the city I didn’t have a car and took the bus to work. I was constantly struck by the fact that maybe 90% of the time I was the ONLY person reading a book or newspaper on the bus—something you’d be hard pressed to see in New York or Chicago. And the Detroit Library is magnificent. But most of the times I visited, it was empty. It’s all part of the Detroit insularity. Nobody knows or cares what goes on outside of the city so everybody is defensive about how we “pick” on Detroit

When I was there, Detroit had about 900,000 people. About one-third were poverty level or below. Say another third were effectively too poor to have much discretionary income. That would leave a solid 300,000 with working class means or more. But there was virtually no retail vibrancy, a skimpy arts sector, and I could go across the river to Windsor, Canada and have more fun downtown in a city of 200,000. Detroit couldn’t even support a McDonald’s downtown.

Detroit has changed some since then, I know. I’ve been back. But until it sheds its insularity and decides to take some radical policy steps it may not be dead, but it’ll be on life support for the foreseeable future.

End of rant.
If the national and world news media would report all the new housing, condo's and renovations to buildings and such other up and coming projects going on in the city, then detroiters and metro detroiters would not get so defensive.



The national and world news media only shows a one side story of Detroit and that is the decline part. They don’t care about the slow incline of Detroit climbing out of the hole. With the media only showing the declining part and not the climbing out part, this hurts Detroit from emerging faster.
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Old 12-25-2010, 08:05 PM
 
268 posts, read 307,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killakoolaide View Post
Dying cities
New Orleans
Youngstown
Buffalo
Pittsburgh
Flint
Cleveland
Scranton
Charleston, WV
Dayton
Detroit

Numbers don't lie all these cities are still losing people at the metropolitan level.
Pittsburgh isn't really losing population. It has a high elderly population that has contributed to the population decline (deaths outnumber births). It really is coming out of the rubble and turning itself around. I wouldn't consider Pittsburgh a dying city at all. More like a city that keeps improving each day. The obstacles Pittsburgh faces is local and state gov't.

As for Scranton, PA, I completely agree it is a dying city. Not necessarily dead, but def dying. There's no sign of improvement at all. It is no doubt a depressed region. Nothing is attractive about it all. You can thank the local and state gov't for a lot of its problems.
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Old 12-26-2010, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,702,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
LIke I said, Detroit people manage the trick of being extraordinarily defensive w/o having much to be defensive about. Its not the collpase of the car industry or suburbinization or crime that's killing the city. And i know full well, that there are nice place to live there and that it's not all some great big ghetto. But many cities have faced similar issues and made a greater comeback, as opposed to Detroit, which seems to be stuck in the 62nd year of its rebuilding effort.

It's the mentality that regins that is killing Motown. It's the insularity. Its the provincialism. Its sad.

And if the population has fallen with little net in-migration I'm afraid all that proves is that people who are born in Detroit die in Detroit.

I'd love to see a real rebirth there, but I don't think that the folks who live there are up to it yet because they're trapped in false pride about their city and living in denial. I hope that changes soon.

yada yada yada get off my thread.....good riddens


like I said how can a city that has lost over half of its population be full of people who never leave???? idiots smh
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Old 12-26-2010, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,702,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Remisc View Post
Show me one of the country's 20 largest cities with a fully intact inner city. Chances are, one doesn't exist. Its not just limited to Detroit.
thank you!
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Old 12-26-2010, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,702,215 times
Reputation: 646
oh btw cityhate

you don't know **** about Detroit people because contrary to belief many Detroiters complain about stuff going on in the city. Many have tried to make a difference and continue to just like many don't. While you were here you should've tried to get to know some Detroiters instead of worrying about abandoned buildings.
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Old 12-26-2010, 04:46 AM
 
Location: McKeesport
4,536 posts, read 7,164,582 times
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Pittsburgh isn't top 20, but the inner-city neighborhoods are almost completely intact (even the more depressed ones!). One exception is the Lower Hill District.
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