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View Poll Results: Dallas is more similar to?
Atlanta, Dallas is more similar to Atlanta than Houston overall 51 43.97%
Houston, Dallas is more similar to Houston than Atlanta overall 47 40.52%
Other 18 15.52%
Voters: 116. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-07-2011, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 20,033,319 times
Reputation: 6686

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Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Lord have mercy, I take a break (had more important things to do, like finally get out of Grad School, thank God) and I see you're all still at it, LOL.

Truth be told, I see the most similarities between Dallas and Atlanta.Both are major inland logistics and aviation hubs (and both share a pretty rich aviation heritage, look it up), and the layouts are quite similar. Uptown Dallas reminds me of Midtown Atlanta. Lakewood reminds me of Downtown Decatur, Far North Dallas/Addison remind me a lot of Sandy Springs/Dunwoody here in Georgia. Lewisville reminds me a lot of NW ATL burbs like Kennesaw, Arlington/GP (at least the southern parts) sort of remind me of parts of Gwinnett County, Plano reminds me of Alpharetta (large corporate burb), I could go on and on. YMMV, but that's my opinion.

Atlanta and Dallas seem to be a bit more "white collar" than Houston - historically, they never had the huge manufacturing/blue collar base that Houston has had. Also, Dallas and Atlanta seem to hide their grit a lot more than Houston does - all cities have their weird, eclectic/haphazard areas, but you are more likely to see them out and about in Houston (or Atlanta for that matter) moreso than you would in Dallas. Dallas feels the most manicured and sterile of the 3, with Atlanta somewhere in the middle.

Obviously, there are huge differences in terms of climate, environment, housing styles, culture, etc. But based on my experience and travels, Dallas and Atlanta have a "feel" very similar to me moreso than Dallas and Houston do. Atlanta does have a more "Eastern" feel than DFW or Houston do.

I get a different "vibe" when I'm in Houston. For one thing, it's much more cosmopolitan than either D/FW or Atlanta. Due to its coastal location, subtropical environment, etc, it reminds me a lot more of a larger New Orleans or Tampa or Orlando and even parts of South Florida. I don't understand how some posters can say that palm trees look tacky in Houston, because they look "just right" to me, and fit with the subtropical, humid environment of H-Town.

Demographically, I'd say Dallas is similar to Houston, and both are in Texas, so there are going to be some in-state similarities in terms of Texan culture as well - think of how San Francisco and Los Angeles are two totally different cities in California but have some similarities due to being in the same state. Dallas and Houston are a hell of a lot easier to drive around than Atlanta is. Atlanta is laid out similar to Austin (rolling terrain, lack of a large cohesive grid system).
I agree with your statements concerning the comparison between Houston and Dallas.

Welcome back and congratulations!
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:05 PM
 
1,841 posts, read 2,592,116 times
Reputation: 1088
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Lord have mercy, I take a break (had more important things to do, like finally get out of Grad School, thank God) and I see you're all still at it, LOL.

Truth be told, I see the most similarities between Dallas and Atlanta.Both are major inland logistics and aviation hubs (and both share a pretty rich aviation heritage, look it up), and the layouts are quite similar. Uptown Dallas reminds me of Midtown Atlanta. Lakewood reminds me of Downtown Decatur, Far North Dallas/Addison remind me a lot of Sandy Springs/Dunwoody here in Georgia. Lewisville/Carrollton reminds me a lot of NW ATL burbs like Kennesaw, Arlington/GP (at least the southern parts) sort of remind me of parts of Snellville, Frisco or McKinney are sort of like Lawrenceville or Duluth, Plano reminds me of Alpharetta (large corporate burb), I could go on and on. YMMV, but that's my opinion.

Atlanta and Dallas seem to be a bit more "white collar" than Houston - historically, they never had the huge manufacturing/blue collar base that Houston has had. Also, Dallas and Atlanta seem to hide their grit a lot more than Houston does - all cities have their weird, eclectic/haphazard areas, but you are more likely to see them out and about in Houston (or Atlanta for that matter) moreso than you would in Dallas. Dallas feels the most manicured and sterile of the three, with Atlanta somewhere in the middle.

Obviously, there are huge differences in terms of climate, environment, housing styles, culture, etc. But based on my experience and travels, Dallas and Atlanta have a "feel" very similar to me moreso than Dallas and Houston. That being said Atlanta does have a distinctive "Eastern" feel than DFW or Houston do not have.

I get a different "vibe" when I'm in Houston. For one thing, it's much more cosmopolitan than either D/FW or Atlanta (and I'm not saying that DFW or Atlanta are not cosmopolitan, I'm saying they're not as cosmopolitan). Due to its coastal location, subtropical environment, etc, it reminds me a lot more of a larger New Orleans or Tampa or Orlando and even parts of South Florida. Matter of fact, Houston seems to share that same 'checkerboard' pattern with New Orleans and Tampa - the good, okay, and bad parts of town can be in close proximity to each other depending on where you are. I always think of how I have driven down Bellaire Blvd and I went from a middle-class neighborhood (Sharpstown) to a poor area with tons of apartments (Gulfton) to an upscale neighborhood (Bellaire - yes, I know it's a separate city from Houston, but still) all within the span of a few minutes. Very few cities in this part of the country are laid out like the major Gulf Coast cities are. Dallas and Atlanta are not laid out like that at all.

Also, I don't understand how some posters can say that palm trees look tacky in Houston, because they look "just right" to me, and fit with the subtropical, humid environment of H-Town.

Demographically, I'd say Dallas is similar to Houston, and both are in Texas, so there are going to be some in-state similarities in terms of Texan culture as well - think of how San Francisco and Los Angeles are two totally different cities in California but have some similarities due to being in the same state.

Hmmm, what else...Dallas and Houston are a hell of a lot easier to drive around and navigate than Atlanta is. Atlanta is laid out similar to Austin (rolling terrain, lack of a large cohesive grid system like DFW or Houston).
^ This.
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:19 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 4,688,167 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by DANNYY View Post
The only project that is out of the loop and not definite is River Oaks District. But for everything else, you must be an extremely old man (85 years +) if another 2 or 3 years are going to make you into a more older person. When in reality, most of the developments are secured and have backed finance and the demand to go.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Speak for yourself. I'm still in my 20s. From what I read, Regent Square is a go. They nearly have all the funds.
I'm only 30. either way, can't speak for other people my age, but whatever isn't done within the next 5 years, I probably won't care that much about it

the grandpa thing was a joke, btw. y'all take stuff way too seriously .....and fyi, in another 2 or 3 years we'll ALL be a "more older person" lol
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Old 01-08-2011, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 20,033,319 times
Reputation: 6686
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
I'm only 30. either way, can't speak for other people my age, but whatever isn't done within the next 5 years, I probably won't care that much about it

the grandpa thing was a joke, btw. y'all take stuff way too seriously .....and fyi, in another 2 or 3 years we'll ALL be a "more older person" lol
Damn......I thought you was around my age.

Lots of mature people on here lol
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Old 01-08-2011, 12:30 AM
 
13,344 posts, read 13,571,270 times
Reputation: 3454
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Lord have mercy, I take a break (had more important things to do, like finally get out of Grad School, thank God) and I see you're all still at it, LOL.

Truth be told, I see the most similarities between Dallas and Atlanta.Both are major inland logistics and aviation hubs (and both share a pretty rich aviation heritage, look it up), and the layouts are quite similar. Uptown Dallas reminds me of Midtown Atlanta. Lakewood reminds me of Downtown Decatur, Far North Dallas/Addison remind me a lot of Sandy Springs/Dunwoody here in Georgia. Lewisville/Carrollton reminds me a lot of NW ATL burbs like Kennesaw, Arlington/GP (at least the southern parts) sort of remind me of parts of Snellville, Frisco or McKinney are sort of like Lawrenceville or Duluth, Plano reminds me of Alpharetta (large corporate burb), I could go on and on. YMMV, but that's my opinion.

Atlanta and Dallas seem to be a bit more "white collar" than Houston - historically, they never had the huge manufacturing/blue collar base that Houston has had. Also, Dallas and Atlanta seem to hide their grit a lot more than Houston does - all cities have their weird, eclectic/haphazard areas, but you are more likely to see them out and about in Houston (or Atlanta for that matter) moreso than you would in Dallas. Dallas feels the most manicured and sterile of the three, with Atlanta somewhere in the middle.

Obviously, there are huge differences in terms of climate, environment, housing styles, culture, etc. But based on my experience and travels, Dallas and Atlanta have a "feel" very similar to me moreso than Dallas and Houston. That being said Atlanta does have a distinctive "Eastern" feel than DFW or Houston do not have.

I get a different "vibe" when I'm in Houston. For one thing, it's much more cosmopolitan than either D/FW or Atlanta (and I'm not saying that DFW or Atlanta are not cosmopolitan, I'm saying they're not as cosmopolitan). Due to its coastal location, subtropical environment, etc, it reminds me a lot more of a larger New Orleans or Tampa or Orlando and even parts of South Florida. Matter of fact, Houston seems to share that same 'checkerboard' pattern with New Orleans and Tampa - the good, okay, and bad parts of town can be in close proximity to each other depending on where you are. I always think of how I have driven down Bellaire Blvd and I went from a middle-class neighborhood (Sharpstown) to a poor area with tons of apartments (Gulfton) to an upscale neighborhood (Bellaire - yes, I know it's a separate city from Houston, but still) all within the span of a few minutes. Very few cities in this part of the country are laid out like the major Gulf Coast cities are. Dallas and Atlanta are not laid out like that at all.

Also, I don't understand how some posters can say that palm trees look tacky in Houston, because they look "just right" to me, and fit with the subtropical, humid environment of H-Town.

Demographically, I'd say Dallas is similar to Houston, and both are in Texas, so there are going to be some in-state similarities in terms of Texan culture as well - think of how San Francisco and Los Angeles are two totally different cities in California but have some similarities due to being in the same state.

Hmmm, what else...Dallas and Houston are a hell of a lot easier to drive around and navigate than Atlanta is. Atlanta is laid out similar to Austin (rolling terrain, lack of a large cohesive grid system like DFW or Houston).
Indeed.
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Old 01-08-2011, 12:42 AM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
8,969 posts, read 8,723,881 times
Reputation: 3292
Seems like Gridin's post as ended the thread. Congrats on grad school.
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Old 01-08-2011, 05:44 AM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 4,688,167 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Also, I don't understand how some posters can say that palm trees look tacky in Houston, because they look "just right" to me, and fit with the subtropical, humid environment of H-Town.
who else but me lol. I was saying they look tacky because of the way they're overdone in Houston. and they absolutely are, in my opinion. to each his own

Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Damn......I thought you was around my age.

Lots of mature people on here lol
is that the diplomatic way of calling me old? believe me, it's not until you turn my age that you'll figure out just how young 30 really is lol
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,477 posts, read 15,016,924 times
Reputation: 5083
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
I'm only 30. either way, can't speak for other people my age, but whatever isn't done within the next 5 years, I probably won't care that much about it

the grandpa thing was a joke, btw. y'all take stuff way too seriously .....and fyi, in another 2 or 3 years we'll ALL be a "more older person" lol
I didn't take it serious. That speak for yourself was more of laughing thing from me.
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Old 01-10-2011, 04:26 PM
 
10,321 posts, read 10,799,407 times
Reputation: 2231
Now this looks like somewhere in the Atlanta area: Cumming area......However, this is in the Houston area.

Cutten Road, Houston, TX - Google Maps
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Old 01-10-2011, 05:11 PM
 
2,650 posts, read 2,344,188 times
Reputation: 1773
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
they may. denver got their's not too long ago. houston, dallas, and philadelphia are the only major cities left without one
Denver's had their NIKEtown as long as I can remember. It's been at least since the late 90s/maybe early 2000s. Denver seems like its a city that gets what it wants.

I agree though that we all know who would get it first if they did decide to open one up in Texas. LOL
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