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Old 01-21-2011, 08:45 PM
 
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Okay maybe not the most reliable website but generally it is believed that the best high school education system is in the northern states like Connecticut and so on. I always wondered about this myself.

Why is it that states up North rank so high in terms of education (high school mainly) compared to states elsewhere, what makes them so hood?

Last edited by Yac; 03-08-2011 at 07:27 AM..
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Old 01-21-2011, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Southerners and Texas will disagree with you, vehemently!
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Old 01-21-2011, 09:29 PM
 
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High taxes - you get what you pay for.
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Old 01-21-2011, 09:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
High taxes - you get what you pay for.
elaborate please
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Old 01-21-2011, 09:55 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Because the northeastern United States rules, pure and simple. How many different ways shall we drive this point home?
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Howard County, MD
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Look to the income levels and educational attainment of the adult population, and you'll find your answer.
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnbiggs View Post
Look to the income levels and educational attainment of the adult population, and you'll find your answer.
Great point.
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:27 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
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I really do weather is a part of it. I know people are going to be quick to disagree, but notice how nearly all counties in tropical/sub-tropical regions are 3rd world. I think with rough winters in cities such as NYC/Toronto/London/Boston people had to create a more accessible living style (denity being key), and there was more time spent indoors (in winter)- So people valued education due to the NEED for progression, and the people had to be "quicker"
Places without harsh winters usually didn't really value these things (as much) because things are slower, and more laid back when you don't have to worry about frigid temperatures and such. Less time indoors, more time outdoors- It distracts a lot of people from valuing education
Higher taxes of course is another reason. And states like MA/NJ/CT really do show that with higher taxes comes a more educated, wealthier population- IE Harvard, Princeton, and Yale.
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Well a few considerations/pieces to the answer

historical... it was the first area of the U.S. to really grow into an advanced economy, so historically it is the financial/business hub. Most companies move and/or build elsewhere to take advantage of lower costs elsewhere... part of this runs into what John Biggs... with the relationship between income levels and educational attainment... It is also why the area attracts people with higher educational attainment and incomes as well. (Compared to our worldwide counterparts... we move around quite a bit).

They also have had longer time to build up a stronger education system.

Other issues for some areas are rural populations tend to be low cost, low education, lower pay. You don't traditionally need a masters degree to run a family farm. Although, there is room for bio engineers in the agri-corporations.

A few places have local/regional issues that hold them down by averages. The racial divide in the south being one that comes to mind. The scars of slavery are still there, despite having come a long way. If you analyze the white black populations separately the educational attainment is much higher for whites, than blacks. The basic modern problem being that, while attitudes about race and segregation are far better than they were before, it has only been a generation or two. Most people stay the same at the same economic level as their parents, so it is going to take time for the disparity to readjust.... Just a quick side note... the racial disparity and problems exist country-wide. It isn't just the south. The difference is we have a larger, mostly rural population here that is left behind and doesn't have as much direction at improving the situation.
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:54 PM
 
Location: CT
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I don't think it's the high taxes. If that were true then California's education system wouldn't be ranked so low. Education isn't one of those problems you can make better just by throwing more money at it, not that it can't help if used correctly to buy like more books and computers for kids or for after school programs and programs for fast and slow kids who don't fit into a normal classroom, but money won't make a worse teacher better or stupid kids smarter. Even with all that stuff money can buy some schools turn out dumb kids anyway, and a teacher with little resources could produce better students. I guess it could have something to do with the quality of staff, if just a lil bit though, cause with thousands of teachers in both regions it's pretty ridiculous to imagine the bulk of one would be worse than other. So yeah, I don't know.
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