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Old 07-18-2008, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Central Iowa - Ankeny
337 posts, read 1,361,315 times
Reputation: 121

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OgleCo View Post
Iowa is very geographically diverse as well.
Get off interstate 80 and head into Northeastern Iowa.
The Western Part of the state along the Missouri River is also very rugged, and in some cases almost considered mountainous.
Google Topo Maps NW Iowa and NE Iowa (Monona and Sioux City in NW Iowa) (Dubuque and Decorah in NE Iowa) and then tell me if it's flat.
It is very subjective and offensive to call a state "boring."
Each state has unique points of interest and beautiful areas.
Some more than others. But to call one state as a whole "boring" is just juvenile, naive, and subjective, most of all.
I love Iowa. I live in Iowa - born and raised. However, I'm going to disagree.

The very hilly non-agricultural areas of NE Iowa cover a small land area, as do the Loess Hills in West Iowa.

The rest of the state is generally the same - with more rolling plains towards the south and flat land in the north and central parts.

Really... not that diverse. I love it anyway.
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Old 07-19-2008, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,526,333 times
Reputation: 1266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairie Dweller View Post
I love Iowa. I live in Iowa - born and raised. However, I'm going to disagree.

The very hilly non-agricultural areas of NE Iowa cover a small land area, as do the Loess Hills in West Iowa.

The rest of the state is generally the same - with more rolling plains towards the south and flat land in the north and central parts.

Really... not that diverse. I love it anyway.
My personal preference for topography is open plains and prarie, so I hear you. The ability to see from horizon to horizon.
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Old 07-19-2008, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Everywhere
1,920 posts, read 2,172,590 times
Reputation: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighPlainsDrifter73 View Post
My personal preference for topography is open plains and prarie, so I hear you. The ability to see from horizon to horizon.
There was this highway in texas that just went on for 500 miles of flat brown dusty fields. All I saw was water tower, grain silo, water tower grain silo, water tower, grain silo, water tower grain silo water tower, grain silo, water tower grain silo ,water tower, grain silo, water tower grain silo OMG I thought I would go insane. 7 LONG hours.
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Old 07-19-2008, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Central Iowa - Ankeny
337 posts, read 1,361,315 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by sberdrow View Post
There was this highway in texas that just went on for 500 miles of flat brown dusty fields. All I saw was water tower, grain silo, water tower grain silo, water tower, grain silo, water tower grain silo water tower, grain silo, water tower grain silo ,water tower, grain silo, water tower grain silo OMG I thought I would go insane. 7 LONG hours.
Was there a windmill or two in there? Maybe a cow?
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Old 07-19-2008, 10:27 AM
 
Location: suburbia
595 posts, read 2,487,691 times
Reputation: 230
I think western Iowa is actually very pretty, the way farmers have to cut into the hillside to grow their crops. It reminds me alot of the pictures I've seen of the rice farmers in China.
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Old 07-19-2008, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Central Iowa - Ankeny
337 posts, read 1,361,315 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by illinoisboy View Post
I think western Iowa is actually very pretty, the way farmers have to cut into the hillside to grow their crops. It reminds me alot of the pictures I've seen of the rice farmers in China.
I guess I see what you mean considering it's just the concept of Terracing. You'll see it in other areas of the state outside of the Loess Hills as well - it helps prevent a lot of erosion.
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Old 07-19-2008, 03:58 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,620,949 times
Reputation: 660
Ohio is not boring at all to the beginning posters...most of the Eastern half (Appalachian Ohio) is quite hilly and in some areas mountainous.
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Old 07-19-2008, 04:18 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,473,045 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairie Dweller View Post
I guess I see what you mean considering it's just the concept of Terracing. You'll see it in other areas of the state outside of the Loess Hills as well - it helps prevent a lot of erosion.
A practice we were using when I was a kid , many years ago , on our Iowa farm. The USDA spearheaded the practice fight after WWII , along with "windrow" tree fences and wind breaks, to stop soil erosion. A reflection of the dust bowl in the Great Plains , in the Thirties. Today , the results of the conservation , are seen all over the Midwest , a welcome break from the endless lack of trees on the fertile...... flat lands . There is something about endless fields of that is comforting however, those " amber waves of grain " in the song.
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Old 07-19-2008, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Everywhere
1,920 posts, read 2,172,590 times
Reputation: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairie Dweller View Post
Was there a windmill or two in there? Maybe a cow?
, yeah I forgot the windmills...right after the silos, as far as cows...nope, cant remember them
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Old 07-21-2008, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Houston,TX
37 posts, read 32,193 times
Reputation: 19
North/South Dakota, Ohio, Iowa, Idaho, Indiana, anywhere that is landlocked that doesn't offer a major city for entertainment. No I don't consider Cleavland, Bosie, or Fargo major cities.
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