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Unread 03-24-2011, 01:09 PM
 
Location: New York, New York USA
239 posts, read 62,855 times
Reputation: 181
I'm surprised Manhattan grew by 3.2%. I thought it would be lower.

Brooklyn, 2,504,700. (increase of 1.6 percent)
Queens 2,230,722 (increase of 0.1 percent)
Manhattan, 1,585,873 (increase of 3.2 percent)
Suffolk, 1,493,350 (increase of 5.2 percent)
Bronx, 1,385,108 (increase of 3.9 percent)




For the first time since the draft riots during the Civil War, the number of black New Yorkers has declined, by 5 percent. Non-Hispanic blacks now account for 23 percent of New Yorkers.

The number of Asians increased 32 percent since 2000, passing the one million mark and now constituting 13 percent of the population.

The Hispanic population rose 8 percent and now makes up 29 percent of the total.

Non-Hispanic whites registered a 3 percent decline, the smallest in decades.

Last edited by HAC NY; 03-24-2011 at 01:23 PM..
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Unread 03-24-2011, 01:18 PM
 
Location: CT
1,214 posts, read 1,101,412 times
Reputation: 1946
Quote:
Originally Posted by HAC NY View Post
I'm surprised Manhattan grew by 3.2%. I thought it would be lower.
Isn't Manhattan suppose to be having a baby boom?
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Unread 03-24-2011, 01:23 PM
 
7,269 posts, read 3,941,739 times
Reputation: 1218
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
The Census has been challenged many times and has revised their numbers accordingly
O ok....so what is the biggest adjustment that has ever been made? Some cities are 100,000 to 200,000 below what they thought they would be. Can they get that population back?
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Unread 03-24-2011, 01:31 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
8,613 posts, read 7,413,837 times
Reputation: 2968
Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
On thing I failed to add about the NYC release, of all five boroughs, the Bureau says that Queens has grown by 0.1% over the last 10 years or 1,343 people.

Thats right, the largest physical Borough that saw the lion share of growth from immigrant groups grew by a whopping 1,343. That's totally likely. /sarcasm off
People moved out you know....especially to the South.
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Unread 03-24-2011, 01:35 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
6,272 posts, read 5,853,206 times
Reputation: 3341
Quote:
Originally Posted by HAC NY View Post
I'm surprised Manhattan grew by 3.2%. I thought it would be lower.

Brooklyn, 2,504,700. (increase of 1.6 percent)
Queens 2,230,722 (increase of 0.1 percent)
Manhattan, 1,585,873 (increase of 3.2 percent)
Suffolk, 1,493,350 (increase of 5.2 percent)
Bronx, 1,385,108 (increase of 3.9 percent)
I too and surprised with how much Manhattan has grown. This is not based off of any observation as I try to avoid Manhattan like the plague when I am in NYC and stick to Queens mostly, but I think logic would dictate that since Manhattan is the most expensive and densest borough then it is likely not to have the highest amount of growth.

On the other side of this, Brooklyn and Queens are also surprising as it has been my perception that they have seen a good chunk of the growth the last 10 years. However, they do have the demographic mixture that would lead itself to an undercount. More surprising than that is the Bronx pretty much has the same demographics that would also be likely not to send in a Census form, but posted the largest gain outside of Staten Island that really has no place but up to go.

NYC is always a very interesting city to study though as far as population growth goes though. It's like trying to figure out all of the factors that goes into a State's growth in one place.

Last edited by waronxmas; 03-24-2011 at 01:45 PM..
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Unread 03-24-2011, 01:44 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
6,272 posts, read 5,853,206 times
Reputation: 3341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarface713 View Post
People moved out you know....especially to the South.
That could be part of it, but Queens is a bit of an odd bird when it comes the Five Boroughs. It's population has only dropped once in a Census. That was in the 1980 after the 77 riots and when the first wave of African-Americans who moved South in the latest "Great Migration" (my parents were a part of that leaving Queens for Atlanta in '78).

Outside of that, it has been able to grow and maintain stability in it's population due to the big advantage it has over the other boroughs: It's cheap to live there (in NYC terms at least). And with the exception of Dominicans, it has been the focal point for all of the big immigrant migrations in NYC for the last 30 years or so.

So with that in mind, I just find it a little odd that Queens only by 1300 and change. But hey, what do I know...though Mayor Bloomberg does agree with me:

Quote:
The numbers don't account for 170,000 new homes built in New York in the last decade, he said, and they improbably count just 1,300 new residents in Queens since 2000.

"There are not a lot of vacant homes in this city," the mayor said. "In Queens, common sense says we didn't go up by 1,000 people."
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Unread 03-24-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: New York, N.Y.
100 posts, read 95,545 times
Reputation: 112
I tallied some numbers for NYC;

CSA

Total Pop: 22,085,649
White N-H: 11,420,944 (52%)
Black N-H: 3,383,420 (15%)
Asian N-H: 1,990,071 (9%)
Hispanic: 4,790,542 (22%)
Other: 500,672 (2%)

MSA

Total Pop: 18,839,740
White N-H: 9,185,813 (49%)
Black N-H: 3,041,046 (16%)
Asian N-H: 1,860,257 (10%)
Hispanic: 4,322,387 (23%)
Other: 430,237 (2%)

NYC

Total Pop: 8,175,133
White N-H: 2,722,904 (33%)
Black N-H: 1,861,295 (23%)
Asian N-H: 1,028,119 (13%)
Hispanic: 2,336,076 (29%)
Other: 226,739 (2%)
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Unread 03-24-2011, 03:13 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
6,272 posts, read 5,853,206 times
Reputation: 3341
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
What does the government consider more accurate the estimate or the actual count? How does the census work? Can they change the numbers after the count comes out? This is interesting.
So here is the thing about the Census:

The Federal government and demographers already know that certain segments of a city's population will not fill out and send in a form. Lower income, people of color (except non-immigrant Asians), and urban residents have reliably under performed in this metric with returns rates well below 50% on average. Also around 15 to 20% (I think) of the public no matter who they are just refuse to send in a Census form.

This is why the Census enumeration is divided in to two parts. After the deadline for mailing forms is in, the Bureau then sends teams of workers to each Census tract and they are to go to each housing structure or apartment that did not return a form and verify if anyone does live there. Of course, this method also has it's downsides due to several uncontrollable factors such as people refusing to answer the survey or even open the door, the sheer size of some cities that make it impossible for a team to cover every square inch of a building, and of course human error due to Census workers who just do not attempt to a collect the information in certain neighborhoods and buildings.

That too was known to also not lead to an accurate count. So during the 1990s, a tertiary method was developed by the Census Bureau to use statistical sampling to account for these known variances presented in a straight up head count for the 2000 Census. However this method was extremely controversial, but it was accepted for that Census and thus many cities saw an increase from 1990 and believe there was a more accurate count.

But politics got in the way for the 2010 Census, and statistical sampling was not used by departmental decree in 2003. So, the counts we are seeing now are only from 1.) People sending in forms. 2.) People who were counted by door to door teams.

So, as you probably can imagine there are a lot of people missed. Thus this is why there is so much controversy with this Census.
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Unread 03-24-2011, 03:16 PM
 
5,521 posts, read 5,825,788 times
Reputation: 3332
You have to wonder why all these city mayors and local-level politicians didn't do a lot more to encourage their constituents to participate. It seems like a huge failure on their part.
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Unread 03-24-2011, 03:24 PM
 
7,269 posts, read 3,941,739 times
Reputation: 1218
Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
So here is the thing about the Census:

The Federal government and demographers already know that certain segments of a city's population will not fill out and send in a form. Lower income, people of color (except non-immigrant Asians), and urban residents have reliably under performed in this metric with returns rates well below 50% on average. Also around 15 to 20% (I think) of the public no matter who they are just refuse to send in a Census form.

This is why the Census enumeration is divided in to two parts. After the deadline for mailing forms is in, the Bureau then sends teams of workers to each Census tract and they are to go to each housing structure or apartment that did not return a form and verify if anyone does live there. Of course, this method also has it's downsides due to several uncontrollable factors such as people refusing to answer the survey or even open the door, the sheer size of some cities that make it impossible for a team to cover every square inch of a building, and of course human error due to Census workers who just do not attempt to a collect the information in certain neighborhoods and buildings.



That too was known to also not lead to an accurate count. So during the 1990s, a tertiary method was developed by the Census Bureau to use statistical sampling to account for these known variances presented in a straight up head count for the 2000 Census. However this method was extremely controversial, but it was accepted for that Census and thus many cities saw an increase from 1990 and believe there was a more accurate count.

But politics got in the way for the 2010 Census, and statistical sampling was not used by departmental decree in 2003. So, the counts we are seeing now are only from 1.) People sending in forms. 2.) People who were counted by door to door teams.

So, as you probably can imagine there are a lot of people missed. Thus this is why there is so much controversy with this Census.
This is very true but I thought there was nothing you could do about it. I know D.C. would probably go up about 20,000 in city proper if they challenged the results for Ward 7 and 8 especially. SE DC is about 90% black. The DMV has more immigrants than almost everywhere except a few places so I wonder how many people are really here. PG county and Montgomery County MD are probably undercounted too. Both of those are minority majority counties with over 1.8 million people between them but that number is probably over 2 million.
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