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View Poll Results: Which one is the most important?
Bay Area 162 54.92%
Boston 54 18.31%
Philadelphia 66 22.37%
Confused 13 4.41%
Voters: 295. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 03-09-2011, 05:59 PM
 
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From what I hear, the Bay area lacks the the same sense of community that is so much apart of Philly, and Boston. We can talk about tall buildings, and density and GDP all day, but at the end of the day it's the people that make a city what it is. Philly and Boston produce very distinct and unique kinds of people, that stand out. Sanfran, not so much. A certain degree of provincialism is healthy for a city, in that it produces unique qualities.
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:00 PM
 
521 posts, read 760,038 times
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I see the Bay Area homers have beat up on Bean Town and Philly homers in the poll. lol
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:07 PM
 
521 posts, read 760,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killakoolaide View Post
From what I hear, the Bay area lacks the the same sense of community that is so much apart of Philly, and Boston. We can talk about tall buildings, and density and GDP all day, but at the end of the day it's the people that make a city what it is. Philly and Boston produce very distinct and unique kinds of people, that stand out. Sanfran, not so much. A certain degree of provincialism is healthy for a city, in that it produces unique qualities.
ugh, we're down to glorifying provincialism now? I don't know that SF is so full of transients as say, D.C. and NYC are. I would rather that a city like Philadelphia get injected with more outsiders who bring in their new and different perspectives. Shake things up a bit. Get the city out of its coziness. That's how creativity oozes out. Philly (the city, not so much the metro) seems to have a lot of people who are born there and spend all their lives in their own neighborhood, let alone venturing out into even Center City. And the city also doesn't tend to attract many outsiders. So the flow of ideas kind of gets stymied.

Philly really needs to do a better job of retaining all the top grads it gets from around the country and world who attend Penn, Drexel, Temple, Curtis, Swarthmore, Haverford, etc. Many stay and thrive in the suburbs but others leave for NYC or other areas because Philly as a city is a bit of a drag on its metro as far as business vitality.
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:21 PM
 
9,976 posts, read 7,474,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
The population per se of the east coast suburban towns may be smaller than their west coast counterparts but there are way way more of them on E coast, which abutt one another and interact they same way larger suburbs on the west coast do.

Comparing Santa Cruz County to Delaware County Pa- due SW of Philadlephia

Santa Cruz County

607 sq mi
250,000 population
25 incorporated towns and cities

Delaware County Pa

174 sq mi
565,00 population
286 incorporated towns + cities.
That's not really a good comparison of counties. Deleware County is directly adjacent to Philadelphia and many of the towns directly border the city itself and have an urban or inner-ring suburb feel to them.

On the other hand Santa Cruz County isn't even really considered a suburban county even though it's south of Silicon Valley and has a population of commuters to the Bay Area. I grew up there..It's one small college/tourist town seperated by a good chunk of mountains from Silicon Valley and only connected by a small windy two lane highway. The only other sizable town is Watsonville, a medium sized town in the middle of farmland. Most of the county is agricultural or the wooded expanses of the Santa Cruz Mountains and growth has been constricted by strict landuse provisions along the coast and urban growth boundaries that permit most new development.

A better comparison to Deleware County would be a real urban/suburban county, like Contra Costa or San Mateo in the Bay Area, or a Southern California county where there are a lot of suburban towns and development.

Last edited by Deezus; 03-09-2011 at 06:55 PM..
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a75206 View Post
ugh, we're down to glorifying provincialism now? I don't know that SF is so full of transients as say, D.C. and NYC are. I would rather that a city like Philadelphia get injected with more outsiders who bring in their new and different perspectives. Shake things up a bit. Get the city out of its coziness. That's how creativity oozes out. Philly (the city, not so much the metro) seems to have a lot of people who are born there and spend all their lives in their own neighborhood, let alone venturing out into even Center City. And the city also doesn't tend to attract many outsiders. So the flow of ideas kind of gets stymied.

Philly really needs to do a better job of retaining all the top grads it gets from around the country and world who attend Penn, Drexel, Temple, Curtis, Swarthmore, Haverford, etc. Many stay and thrive in the suburbs but others leave for NYC or other areas because Philly as a city is a bit of a drag on its metro as far as business vitality.
Contrary to popular belief, the most transient parts of the metro are within the city, which is one of the reasons it saw a population gain this past decade. CC Philly is very cosmopolitan, it's rare to meet someone downtown that actually grew up there. The concentration of major colleges within the city also contribute to it's more worldy nature. The most provincial parts of the city tend to be the rough hoods, outside of the city, PA as a whole is possibly the most provincial state. The burbs, and small cities/towns outside of Philly, are pretty much set in there ways, and have been for a long time.
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:52 PM
 
2,958 posts, read 3,763,605 times
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Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
Give me the refined culture of Europe over Cali. So much more like the east coast.
Yes, people so often wander around Philthy confused thinking they've somehow stumbled their way into Madrid or Paris.

Try the east coast wishes it was so much more like europe and deludes itself into thinking the two are on par. Try getting out of your easter sliver of inbreeding and ignorance for some perspective once in a while.
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by john_starks View Post
lol, i don't get it
LOL clearly. That's the sad part.
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:55 PM
 
2,234 posts, read 2,351,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
That's not really a good comparison of counties. Deleware County is directly adjacent to Philadelphia and many of the towns directly border the city itself and have an urban or inner-ring suburb feel to them.

On the other hand Santa Cruz County isn't even really considered a suburban county even though it's south of Silicon Valley and has commuters to the Bay Area. I grew up there..it's one small college/tourist town seperated by a good chunk of mountains from Silicon Valley and only connected by a small windy two lane highway. The only other sizable town is a Watsonville, a medium sized town in the middle of farmland. Most of the county is agricultural or the wooded expanses of the Santa Cruz Mountains and growth has been constricted by strict landuse provisions on long the coast and urban growth boundaries that permit most new development.

A better comparison to Deleware County would be a real urban/suburban county, like Contra Costa or San Mateo in the Bay Area, or a Southern California county where there are a lot of suburban towns and development.
Here's a better Comparison
San Mateo Coutny
449 sq. miles
population-700,000
20 incorporated cities
17 unincorporated communites

MontCo, PA
483 sq. miles
population-800,00
38 townships
24 Boroughs
41 CDPs
^^^^^^^^A ton of suburban overlapping.
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:57 PM
 
2,958 posts, read 3,763,605 times
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Originally Posted by slo1318 View Post
Which Europe? Liverpool? Romania? Leipzig? Barcelona? Rotterdam? Estonia? The east coast is colonial, but doesnt feel Euro.
It does, however, feel small-minded, stubborn, insecure, ignorant and spiteful!
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
3,971 posts, read 8,606,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a75206 View Post

Philly really needs to do a better job of retaining all the top grads it gets from around the country and world who attend Penn, Drexel, Temple, Curtis, Swarthmore, Haverford, etc. Many stay and thrive in the suburbs but others leave for NYC or other areas because Philly as a city is a bit of a drag on its metro as far as business vitality.
They're trying but its not easy.

Its a 300 yr old city which also happened to be the industrial epicenter of the USA. 18th ,19th early 20th century prosperity turned into late 20th century deindustrialization,neighborhood disinvestment, and ensuing middle class flight to the suburbs.

Philly took a very different path than tidy coastal SF + Bos. In many regards we should all be very thankful as Philadelphia put this country on its back in earlier times.

Philadelphia's industrial path was of one of the greater good of the country. SF + Boston's educated regional approach served themselves very well. Philadelphia would have been much better off taking SF + Bostons passage but it would have had a significant impact on the development of the USA or the lack-there-of.
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