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View Poll Results: Which one is the most important?
Bay Area 291 57.97%
Boston 92 18.33%
Philadelphia 98 19.52%
Confused 21 4.18%
Voters: 502. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-27-2015, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,861 posts, read 10,135,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pac_5 View Post
As someone slightly neutral - those aren't the most impressive pictures of the area around Philadelphia. Definitely a distant third to the images we associate with the Bay Area and New England.

Let's just call a spade a spade and admit that if you drew a sixty-mile arc around Philadelphia, nothing in that arc is particularly geographically significant or naturally beautiful.
LOL-well that's just an absurd thing to say. The Wissahickon Park/Gorge is down the street from my house and probably more naturally beautiful than most anything in the cities of Boston or SF. SF has Golden Gate park which is unique but Philly has gems too (and Boston for that matter). Fairmount Park is still the largest though.

Outside the city the Philly area seems to transition sooner to rural/tranquil scenery, especially in PA.
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Old 07-27-2015, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,896 posts, read 12,364,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pac_5 View Post
As someone slightly neutral - those aren't the most impressive pictures of the area around Philadelphia. Definitely a distant third to the images we associate with the Bay Area and New England.

Let's just call a spade a spade and admit that if you drew a sixty-mile arc around Philadelphia, nothing in that arc is particularly geographically significant or naturally beautiful.


I just want to know how SF is an easier place to live and more impressive than Boston AND CERTAINLY PHILADELPHIA,LOL. When the cost of living is significantly higher in SF.

Granted Philadelphia has a few more grittier areas/satellite cities but when you take the other 95% of the region into account Im not seeing how SF or Boston blows Philly away. A mile West of SF is pretty amazing area to live if you are a walrus, to the east its get brown and desolate relatively quick. Pennsylvania on the otherhand is one of the most consistently picturesque states in the USA 150 miles by 300 miles of incredible landscape. Downtown SF was modeled after downtown Philly.Places like Berkley modeled after Philadelphias Chestnut Hill and The Main Line neighborhoods. I hear alot of well we got Berkley but we had Berkleys' template 100 years before Berkley existed, places like Swarthmore,Chestnut Hill, Bryn Mawr,Wynnewood etc etc..

Stone Harbor/Avalon NJ are consistently ranked in the top 5 USA as far as most expensive median home sales.

Get over yourselves.
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Old 07-27-2015, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,896 posts, read 12,364,338 times
Reputation: 2602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pac_5
Let's just call a spade a spade and admit that if you drew a sixty-mile arc around Philadelphia, nothing in that arc is particularly geographically significant or naturally beautiful.
Lets just say you are wrong..




Philly MSA. within 60 mile radius.

It may not be geographically significant but not sure how you can say its not naturally beautiful. That sounds like B.S. that you just made up.

Valley Forge- 12 miles from Center City Philly






Pulpit Rock-Berks County





Bucks County





Ocean City NJ




Last edited by rainrock; 07-27-2015 at 03:23 PM..
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Old 07-27-2015, 03:04 PM
 
7 posts, read 5,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pac_5 View Post
As someone slightly neutral - those aren't the most impressive pictures of the area around Philadelphia. Definitely a distant third to the images we associate with the Bay Area and New England.

Let's just call a spade a spade and admit that if you drew a sixty-mile arc around Philadelphia, nothing in that arc is particularly geographically significant or naturally beautiful.

You should probably stick to being neutral because Philadelphia has a lot more geographic beauty than you realize within 60 miles.

What you're picturing in your head about New England is a good two hours away from Boston in the least (Berkshires, White Mountain, Killington, Cape Cod, etc.), did you know that?

Boston isn't exactly Portland or Seattle in terms of immediate area here, and you're really undermining the Philadelphia area. At the least, the Philadelphia and Boston metro areas are even in terms of geography. Philadelphia is not a Midwest plain by any means whatsoever, and the ocean is a mere 45 minutes away on top of it. Fairmount Park is the largest urban park in the world. The suburbs of Philadelphia are full of lush valleys and rivers, moreso than Boston because its landlocked.
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Old 07-27-2015, 03:10 PM
 
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Most people that picture New England are seeing Vermont and New Hampshire and think Boston is right in the middle.

Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island don't really compare IMO to Vermont, New Hampshire or Maine in terms of geographic beauty.
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Old 07-27-2015, 03:13 PM
 
7 posts, read 5,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
LOL-well that's just an absurd thing to say. The Wissahickon Park/Gorge is down the street from my house and probably more naturally beautiful than most anything in the cities of Boston or SF. SF has Golden Gate park which is unique but Philly has gems too (and Boston for that matter). Fairmount Park is still the largest though.

Outside the city the Philly area seems to transition sooner to rural/tranquil scenery, especially in PA.

He/she is in for a reality check.

Philadelphia transitions pretty quickly outside the city into valleys, rivers and hills. Extremely picturesque area. One of my favorites in the entire Northeast.
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Old 07-27-2015, 04:40 PM
 
1,031 posts, read 2,348,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pac_5 View Post
As someone slightly neutral - those aren't the most impressive pictures of the area around Philadelphia. Definitely a distant third to the images we associate with the Bay Area and New England.

Let's just call a spade a spade and admit that if you drew a sixty-mile arc around Philadelphia, nothing in that arc is particularly geographically significant or naturally beautiful.
Based on your comments you have never been to the Philadelphia area. The Philadelphia area is beautiful. Please keep your outdated opinions to yourself. Thanks.
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Old 07-27-2015, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,339 posts, read 7,358,196 times
Reputation: 4105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pac_5 View Post
Let's just call a spade a spade and admit that if you drew a sixty-mile arc around Philadelphia, nothing in that arc is particularly geographically significant or naturally beautiful.
I suppose, as they say, then, that beauty is the in the eye of the beholder.

I greatly appreciate the grandeur of the West, but the East is far more uniformly beautiful--with constant bucolic, lush rolling hills and thick foliage that you'd never find in the vast majority of the West.

The Philadelphia region is certainly no exception, and in fact, the region greatly excels in preserving open space/farmland and goes to great lengths to prevent over-development--which gives the area a charmingly rustic feel for a major urban area. The only other major urban region I've come across that evokes a similar feel is Boston.

Last edited by Duderino; 07-27-2015 at 06:26 PM..
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Old 07-27-2015, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,184,979 times
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I have to say that even though I think a sixty-mile radius around San Francisco will afford you the most varied and spectacular natural beauty available around a similar swath of any major American city, the idea that the countryside around Philadelphia is anything less than spectacular is simply ridiculous.

The first time I went to Philly, I had a shoot in Lancaster, and we flew into Philly. I was knocked out on the drive up to Lancaster. Then, we spent the weekend in Philly and the surrounding area. Really beautiful. Surprisingly so.
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Old 07-27-2015, 07:06 PM
 
7 posts, read 5,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
I have to say that even though I think a sixty-mile radius around San Francisco will afford you the most varied and spectacular natural beauty available around a similar swath of any major American city, the idea that the countryside around Philadelphia is anything less than spectacular is simply ridiculous.

The first time I went to Philly, I had a shoot in Lancaster, and we flew into Philly. I was knocked out on the drive up to Lancaster. Then, we spent the weekend in Philly and the surrounding area. Really beautiful. Surprisingly so.

We're not saying its like Oregon or Washington here, but to say there's literally nothing around it is totally false.

The Philadelphia metro area has some of the most lush and green suburbs and areas of any metro I have seen.

Its not anything like Chicago with flat prairie mostly outside, and I know that not all of the Chicago area is like that, but the Midwest is certainly flatter and less forested in comparison.

Boston and Philadelphia are both very comparable metro areas in terms of forestry, rolling hills, valleys and rivers. Very, very lush areas.
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