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Old 04-22-2011, 11:17 AM
 
Location: New York NY
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Here in NYC natural disasters are pretty rare. I actually think we're a good bet as one of the places least prone to them. No tornadoes or earthquakes worth mentioning, no tsunamis or volcanoes. A hurricane or a blizzard only once in a blue moon, and even then neither reaches the intensity of a Rocky Mountain blizzard or hurricane Katrina. No severe heat or severe cold for more than a week or two each year, and those spells aren't like the severe cold you can find inland or heat in the deserts or the deep south. No wildfires.

Phillies2011 is right that the deaths in NE cities that do occur are often not the result of extreme weather, but stem from ignorance, negligence, poverty, or homelessness.

We got all sorts of problems here in the NE. But natural disasters aren't among them.
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Old 04-22-2011, 11:21 AM
 
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The Northeast, and especially New England, is fairly free of natural disasters; coastal New England might get high winds/rainfall from hurricane remnants ( but usually the hurricane itself has dissipated going this far north), or you can get massive snowfalls (Nor'easters), but earthquakes/tornadoes are rare..
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Old 04-22-2011, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Here in NYC natural disasters are pretty rare. I actually think we're a good bet as one of the places least prone to them. No tornadoes or earthquakes worth mentioning, no tsunamis or volcanoes. A hurricane or a blizzard only once in a blue moon, and even then neither reaches the intensity of a Rocky Mountain blizzard or hurricane Katrina. No severe heat or severe cold for more than a week or two each year, and those spells aren't like the severe cold you can find inland or heat in the deserts or the deep south. No wildfires.

Phillies2011 is right that the deaths in NE cities that do occur are often not the result of extreme weather, but stem from ignorance, negligence, poverty, or homelessness.

We got all sorts of problems here in the NE. But natural disasters aren't among them.
yea i mean obviously people can die in a blizzard, people do every year, lots of them. but the majority of them are homeless, elderly, poor, or are driving when they shouldn't be.

if you are a person with a roof over your head and the means to heat your home a blizzard isn't much of a natural disaster.

i mean honestly when there's a blizzard me and the gf take off work and watch movies by the fire place and sip on hot cocoa. we'll often also bundle up and go out to enjoy how beautiful philadelphia looks with a coat of white paint all over and enjoy the quite serenity.

haha i mean honestly it's not exactly scary.

if i was in the middle of a tornado or an earthquake i don't think i'd be as relaxed haha.

not trivializing the deaths caused by blizzards. but this is the 21st century, they aren't a big deal to most.

honestly unless you live in a river valley that is prone to flooding or a coastal town that can get hit with a hurricane than the NE is basically as safe as it gets as far as i'm concerned.
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Old 04-22-2011, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Waterloo, ON
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Blizzards are different from most of the other disasters though. You can walk outside and be perfectly safe, you'll almost certainly not get property damage (unless you get like 6ft of snow and your roof collapse) and you'll be safe indoors. Most cities that get lots of snow are prepared to clear the roads, so you might even be able to go to work. However, there is one danger: more car accidents, which is not really an issue with the other disasters.

Freezing rain can be bad (see 1998 ice storm), but I think it can happen in much of the midwest, NE and even pretty far South.

wildfires - mostly an issue in the West I think.
hurricanes - mostly an issue in the gulf and SE, to a lesser degree in the NE.
tornadoes - across most of the midwest, as well as places with hurricanes
earthquakes - west coast and to a certain degree midwest
floods - I know it's an issue in the Northern Plains, I don't know about elsewhere
volcanoes - Yellowstone, St Helens... are there any other danger areas?
blizzards - I don't think they're as bad as freezing rain, but it's worst in upstate NY and Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

So over all, I would say Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire and Eastern Minnesota are all pretty good.
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Old 04-23-2011, 02:29 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Default Power Grid Failure & Earthquakes in unsuspecting areas

I wonder what area would be most resilient during a power grid failure?

There are a few parts of the country that potentially active fault lines that could potentially wreak havoc but are relatively unknown.

Western New England through the Connecticut River Valley and Adirondack Region of New York up into Quebec have fault lines that get small tremors once in a while could jolt a big one.

The New Madrid Fault line where Missouri/Arkansas/Tennessee meet has been said to potentially have a devastating earthquake to the region from St. Louis down to Memphis.
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Old 04-23-2011, 02:42 PM
 
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"Blizzards are different from most of the other disasters though. You can walk outside and be perfectly safe.." << Depends on how far you walk. It's very easy to get completely disoriented in a blizzard and get lost. I one heard of an elderly lady in a rural area who walked outside to get her mail. She slipped in her lane, broke her ankle and freeze to death in her own yard.
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Old 04-23-2011, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
"Blizzards are different from most of the other disasters though. You can walk outside and be perfectly safe.." << Depends on how far you walk. It's very easy to get completely disoriented in a blizzard and get lost. I one heard of an elderly lady in a rural area who walked outside to get her mail. She slipped in her lane, broke her ankle and freeze to death in her own yard.
But then, that was an elderly lady. I don't doubt that you can get disoriented in a blizzard, but it's less likely that a physically fit adult is going to fall like that and freeze.
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Old 04-23-2011, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Waterloo, ON
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A deadly decision | London | News | London Free Press

ok granted it can happen under extreme circumstances if you leave a safe area (building or car), but it's very rare. In the 20 years I've lived in Toronto, it never got that bad.
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Old 04-24-2011, 08:38 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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One could fall in a sinkhole, get plowed over by a tsunami wave, sucked up in a cloud and wind vortex, get leveled in a collapsing building during an earthquake, the dam could break, Yellowstone could change the earths climate, or get hit by a bus, have a heart attack, get posessed by a manipulative cult leader, or have a terrified existance like Edgar Alan Poe. **** happens, and you move on. San Francisco rebuilt, and so will the next city mother nature has a problem with. If the city is worth its weight, it will rebuild again.

New Orleans could either hire an army of Dutch engineers, or become the next Atlantis.
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