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Old 10-04-2007, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,250,526 times
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Eureka Springs????? LOL! That might make the list of "Scary Artsy Towns"... but hillbilly? Too funny.

I can think of a few places in Arkansas that are isolated and distrustful of outsiders. I wouldn't really call them "hillbilly." Fountain Lake, up until the last few years, might have qualified. But this last year things started changing there, too.

 
Old 10-04-2007, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
4,739 posts, read 7,398,957 times
Reputation: 2945
Go to Jolo West Virginia. Its a dot on a map, blink and your through it. Most of its inhabitants don't work, alot are on disability from the coal mines, trailors a few shacks, the creek that flows along side the road is full of garbage, old car batteries and several people have streight pipes that pour raw sewage directly into the creek. Birth defects have touched about every family in this close knit community, Hatfields, Vances and Mullens are well known names. This crime ridden town has the bragging rights to a seperate insurace classification with adjusted rates because of the amount of arson cases. The movie Deliverance looks like a Disney version.
 
Old 10-04-2007, 11:09 AM
 
39,020 posts, read 23,141,190 times
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Okay, since when do hillbillies live in towns?

DC
 
Old 10-04-2007, 12:53 PM
 
Location: IN
20,164 posts, read 34,473,831 times
Reputation: 12507
Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Eureka Springs????? LOL! That might make the list of "Scary Artsy Towns"... but hillbilly? Too funny.

I can think of a few places in Arkansas that are isolated and distrustful of outsiders. I wouldn't really call them "hillbilly." Fountain Lake, up until the last few years, might have qualified. But this last year things started changing there, too.
Have you actually been to Eureka Springs? Most smaller towns in Arkansas are quite distrustful of outsiders in my opinion. Yes, Eureka Springs is known as an "artist town" but many of the smaller and more isolated towns and rural areas in northern Arkansas can be hillbilly. Newton and Searcy counties in Arkansas come to mind.
 
Old 10-04-2007, 01:10 PM
 
39,020 posts, read 23,141,190 times
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I'm not going to be dragged back into a debate about Eureka Springs (a town with a population less than 3000, but with over 70 hotels and 100 restaurants--surely they don't want visitors to their small town), but I'd like to point out that people everywhere can be distrustful of strangers. In a big city where millions of people live, strangers are a little more difficult to identify than when a stranger comes to a town of 300. And in a big city where people look askance, act distrustful, we discount their behavior to rudeness, but when people in a small town do the same thing, they are ignorant and potential hillbillies. When you roll into the town of Podunk, and no one knows you, and any actions you take in that town will have a tremendous impact, are the people supposed to just pretend that you are a local? When you visit a restaurant you've never been to before in whatever city you live in, do you behave exactly the same as you do when you are hundreds of miles away from home in a strange town you've never been before and you stop in a diner for a bite? Isn't there a bit more wariness when you're out of your element? Do you think people can't sense when they're being judged?

DC
 
Old 10-04-2007, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Concord, California.
430 posts, read 1,258,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC at the Ridge View Post
I'm not going to be dragged back into a debate about Eureka Springs (a town with a population less than 3000, but with over 70 hotels and 100 restaurants--surely they don't want visitors to their small town), but I'd like to point out that people everywhere can be distrustful of strangers. In a big city where millions of people live, strangers are a little more difficult to identify than when a stranger comes to a town of 300. And in a big city where people look askance, act distrustful, we discount their behavior to rudeness, but when people in a small town do the same thing, they are ignorant and potential hillbillies. When you roll into the town of Podunk, and no one knows you, and any actions you take in that town will have a tremendous impact, are the people supposed to just pretend that you are a local? When you visit a restaurant you've never been to before in whatever city you live in, do you behave exactly the same as you do when you are hundreds of miles away from home in a strange town you've never been before and you stop in a diner for a bite? Isn't there a bit more wariness when you're out of your element? Do you think people can't sense when they're being judged?

DC
Great point and I agree 100!

It's true that SOME small towns do have a lot of "hillbillies" or white trash, -but that's also true of some cities, and of many working class suburbs for that matter. A lot of small towns have very few such people and are quite respectable places, but becuase they appear so diferant (though on average are not as much so as they appear in reality) culturally than most large cities in some respects and of lower socioeconomic status in some respects, they often still get treated with prejudice by many of more "cosmopolitan" types.

And so what, there are good and bad people of everywhere! -Most small towns are a lot safer than most cities when it comes to more serious crimes(though there is often plenty of lesser, non index, crime that is often not reported). there actualy are many small towns that are exceptions and actualy do have high official crime rates, but they are the exception, and are mainly located in the rural west and non Appalachian south. Many have large black or other minority populations, but there are also some in the west that are heavily white but still have major problems, often fueled in large part by meth. They tend to be larger small towns, places like Eureka and Orville California (two that I am familiar with).
 
Old 10-04-2007, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Thumb of Michigan
4,489 posts, read 6,656,544 times
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I second my nomination of Harts, West Virginia.

Let's just say i've gotten a chance to mingle with the 'underbelly' of that town!......................

Can be scary to an outsider. It is scary-weird to someone who's familiar with it!
 
Old 10-04-2007, 08:49 PM
 
Location: IN
20,164 posts, read 34,473,831 times
Reputation: 12507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcm58 View Post
Go to Jolo West Virginia. Its a dot on a map, blink and your through it. Most of its inhabitants don't work, alot are on disability from the coal mines, trailors a few shacks, the creek that flows along side the road is full of garbage, old car batteries and several people have streight pipes that pour raw sewage directly into the creek. Birth defects have touched about every family in this close knit community, Hatfields, Vances and Mullens are well known names. This crime ridden town has the bragging rights to a seperate insurace classification with adjusted rates because of the amount of arson cases. The movie Deliverance looks like a Disney version.
Yes, Jolo is located in McDowell County WV. This is the poorest county in the entire state and one of the poorest in the country in terms of per capita household income. This is also one of the most impoverished and isolated areas of Appalachia with a reliance on coal mining and other extractive resource industries that have downsized considerably. They are being replaced by heavy machinery and the horrible practice of mountaintop removal in some areas of southern WV.
 
Old 10-04-2007, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, FL; Upstate NY native
217 posts, read 799,159 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC at the Ridge View Post
I'm not going to be dragged back into a debate about Eureka Springs (a town with a population less than 3000, but with over 70 hotels and 100 restaurants--surely they don't want visitors to their small town), but I'd like to point out that people everywhere can be distrustful of strangers. In a big city where millions of people live, strangers are a little more difficult to identify than when a stranger comes to a town of 300. And in a big city where people look askance, act distrustful, we discount their behavior to rudeness, but when people in a small town do the same thing, they are ignorant and potential hillbillies. When you roll into the town of Podunk, and no one knows you, and any actions you take in that town will have a tremendous impact, are the people supposed to just pretend that you are a local? When you visit a restaurant you've never been to before in whatever city you live in, do you behave exactly the same as you do when you are hundreds of miles away from home in a strange town you've never been before and you stop in a diner for a bite? Isn't there a bit more wariness when you're out of your element? Do you think people can't sense when they're being judged?

DC

Great post!

When I travel and stop to eat in an unfamiliar town, especially if it's a small rural place, I do feel out of place and it feels like everyone is staring at me. This happens in every state I've visited.
 
Old 10-04-2007, 11:34 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,604,927 times
Reputation: 660
Here's the plain and simple story folks. I don't think you can call a county that is poor and impoverished a hillbilly county, especially since not all hillbillies are poor. You want hillbilly towns, go to Appalachia (Upstate New York, Western Pennsylvania, East Central and Southeastern Ohio, Western Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama). The other hillbilly region could be considered those residing in the Shawnee Forest region of Southern Illinois, or the Illinois Ozarks as they are called, and also South Central Missouri namely starting around Rolla and heading southwest to Springfield and south into the Northern 2/3 of Arkansas) The Ozarks and Appalachia are what make up the primary region of "hillbilly" country, and note that hillbillies are therefore not exclusive to the South, as they reside in a good chunk of Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Upstate New York. Hillbillies are not necessarily Southerners folks.
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