U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-06-2007, 07:29 PM
 
1,119 posts, read 2,420,695 times
Reputation: 382

Advertisements

Completely agreed. However, he's just a 17 years old man...so easy on the guy

Its hard to see the whole world and have a complete picture of everything through TV when you're at a young age. Once he's done enough travelling, he'll have a better perspective. Just give him time

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
The following are your words, not mine (emphasis added):

You are responsible for your own statements and implications therein. Your inability to think of any other attraction besides the Sears Tower is your problem, not ours -- or anyone else's who knows anything about the city even if they've never been here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-06-2007, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Henderson NV
1,134 posts, read 866,698 times
Reputation: 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
There may be lots of traffic, but moving (or not so moving) cars don't define metro areas. If they did, all of I-95 would be one metro region! I think I-90 between Cleveland and Chicagoland would be one too.

"New York would, and that's my point." Your point is way off and that's my point. If Bloomberg pointed to Hartford, CT and said "I want that in the New York CSA" it wouldn't happen (unless he got thousands of people to move there and agree to commute to NYC every day and fill out their Census forms in 2010). There's no local government participation in this stuff. It's based on how you and I fill out our Census forms. If you think San Diego should be in the LA CSA, get yourself and about 100,000 other people to move down there and commute to LA every day.

Furthermore, MSAs and CSAs are not about "forced assimilation" or even "ultimate influence over others" or egos (having to grow a pair?). They're ways of analyzing population spread, commuting patterns, the daily habits of populations. They explain why there's demand for housing in certain areas, why growth can be expected to occur in certain areas/corridors, etc. There's a reason Northern New Jersey is as developed/crowded/trafficky as it is. That's because people live here and work here to be part of this huge metropolitan market and undoubtedly New York City has something to do with how this all happened. Newark and Jersey City would be important cities without New York, but they thrive off of being part of this huge metropolitan area. It's a huge selling point and a reason people want to be there. The full name of the region is the New York-Newark-Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT- PA CSA. NJ isn't bowing to anybody, neither is CT. If you ever come here you'll quickly see that this is one huge metropolitan unit.

P.S. The New York Giants and New York Jets play in Bergen County, not Essex. Essex County is home to the New Jersey Devils. What about Anaheim? Or does the inclusion "of anaheim" in the smallest font ever constitute "a pair"? Should the Washington Redskins be the "Landover, Maryland Redskins" or how about the "Foxboro Patriots"? Blah.
Good points with the sports teams. I didn't agree with that either. I don't see the parallel, though. Orange county's Anaheim has been associated with being in Los Angeles as long as Disney has been in business. They wouldn't agree. It's the truth, though it doesn't bend over because it's not generally dismissed by L. A. But it's angry now, how come New Jersey's not? New York dumps on New Jersey on a daily basis. New York literally dug its subways and dumped the dirt on New Jersey. And what's with this ' Blah '? You sounded like a professor who knew his stuff about metropolitan areas and stats. That is, until you used such language! I've been observing New York's very personality since about 1977. There is an unmistakeable pattern at work there, and it is all about competition! It's a hubritic attitude that comes from perceived front runner status. Front runner, yes. Less and less so each day, but everything is cyclical.I have my attitude too, but it's not hubris. I can back up what I say most of the time. I don't run around making statements like ' world capital ' and ' center of the universe '. Now that is silly! I just have my perceptions, you have the stats. I'm not too silly to know that ScrantonWilkesBarre should actually be known as ScrantonWilkesBarreHazelton, though! Someone should probably tell him.

Last edited by milquetoast; 08-06-2007 at 09:02 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2007, 09:27 PM
 
1,501 posts, read 5,113,442 times
Reputation: 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by pandabear View Post
As a chicago native i have to comment on your blatant mistakes. One of the main reasons people don't like chicago is because of the people. Its people like you, that make others think chicagoans have an inferiority complex. .
Must strongly disagree here. The infamous weather is Chicago's thorn. The people, in person, were the most down to earth and "real" than of any place I'd ever resided.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pandabear View Post
If you truley loved chicago, like me, and as much as i hate to admitt it, than you would just sit back, relax and realize that CHICAGO, is the nation's best kept secret.
Totally agree. And Chicago just isn't as showy and pretentious. It's just there. Have to be there to fully appreciate. It's more than just stunning architecture. World Class, indeed!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2007, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Scarsdale, NY
2,775 posts, read 10,598,226 times
Reputation: 794
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRealAngelion View Post
No, we don't want to fight back. Don't have the time or patience. Are too busy having a life. Most of the arguments are so ridculous and silly, there's no point.

Also, get your stories straight. First you claim LA is your "second home" and then you claim you've only been there once for a wedding. I mean if you want to be a storyteller, be good at it.
If you don't want to fight back, don't start ****. Pretty simple.

You got me on the "2nd home" thing. Maybe I haven't spent my life there, but the feeling I got there was warm, but when I get back to New York, the feeling is warmer because I've grown up here. And since we're going to be renting a condo every year starting next in LA, I'll have to get used to the area, so hopefully my perspective will change as I get to know it and spend more time there. Maybe someday as I grow older, LA will be my "hometown."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2007, 10:22 PM
 
Location: City of Angels
1,288 posts, read 4,593,212 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureCop View Post
If you don't want to fight back, don't start ****. Pretty simple.

You got me on the "2nd home" thing. Maybe I haven't spent my life there, but the feeling I got there was warm, but when I get back to New York, the feeling is warmer because I've grown up here. And since we're going to be renting a condo every year starting next in LA, I'll have to get used to the area, so hopefully my perspective will change as I get to know it and spend more time there. Maybe someday as I grow older, LA will be my "hometown."
Huh...a little passive-aggressive, maybe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2007, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Scarsdale, NY
2,775 posts, read 10,598,226 times
Reputation: 794
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRealAngelion View Post
Huh...a little passive-aggressive, maybe.
I looked it up, and it sounds like me. But it's not as much of a disorder as it is irritation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2007, 11:10 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,330 posts, read 19,115,564 times
Reputation: 18436
I believe that New York and LA overshadow Chicago because of the demographics. Both are huge coastal cities and this does make a difference. Chicago is a great city, one of quiet quality. NY and LA really do scream for attention. All three are great places to live and visit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2007, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Texas!
332 posts, read 342,420 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
The following are your words, not mine (emphasis added):

You are responsible for your own statements and implications therein. Your inability to think of any other attraction besides the Sears Tower is your problem, not ours -- or anyone else's who knows anything about the city even if they've never been here.
Once agian you misread what I said. I said nothing really stands out in Chicago except the skyline and the Sear's tower.... It dosen't have any types of attractions that are really known worldwide. Quit trying to make me look dumb because I know what I said,it's just that you keep trying to put words in my mouth that I didn't say.

I know I'm responsible for my own statements but just because I don't know any attractions in Chicago don't make me stupid! I could ask anyone in my town what some things that Chicago have, they would struggle with it. I'd ask them something about New York or L.A. they'll give me tons of things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2007, 03:48 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,691 posts, read 87,231,678 times
Reputation: 29361
Quote:
Originally Posted by madmann101 View Post
Once agian you misread what I said. I said nothing really stands out in Chicago except the skyline and the Sear's tower.... It dosen't have any types of attractions that are really known worldwide. Quit trying to make me look dumb because I know what I said,it's just that you keep trying to put words in my mouth that I didn't say.

I know I'm responsible for my own statements but just because I don't know any attractions in Chicago don't make me stupid! I could ask anyone in my town what some things that Chicago have, they would struggle with it. I'd ask them something about New York or L.A. they'll give me tons of things.
No kid, I read you perfectly. I realize this is a long-winded post, but be patient and stick with me, because I think we might be getting somewhere.

I didn't say you were stupid. In fact, I would hazard a guess that you're actually a pretty sharp lad as suggested by your healthy curiosity. What I said is that you were ignorant, specifically with regard to Chicago. There's a difference between stupidity and ignorance. Stupidity means you are incapable of learning much of anything. Ignorance means you don't have very much knowledge about a particular subject, whether you are capable of learning about it or not.

There is nothing wrong with being ignorant about a particular subject. Nobody knows everything. Nobody can. For instance, I'm going to guess that we are both equally ignorant about the dietary habits of the nomadic tribes of Mongolia. And just as you are ignorant about Chicago, I am similarly ignorant about Houston. I know about Houston in only very broad generalities that are confirmed by a couple of short visits long ago; namely that it's hot, it's big, it's sprawling compared to Chicago, it's growing, it's humid, it's right near the Gulf, etc. That's all I know about it. But here's the difference between you and me: since I am ignorant about Houston, I keep my mouth shut about it lest I make statements that are obviously unfounded. So let me try to educate you a little about Chicago in the hopes of correcting some of your uninformed views . . . . . .

Excluding cities that have built their economies entirely around tourism (namely Las Vegas and Orlando), Chicago is the third-most popular tourist city in the country. Not surprisingly, Los Angeles and New York are #1 and #2, though it may be somewhat surprising that they are #1 and #2 in that order.

You may believe that Chicago is not known worldwide, or that it is not a worldwide attraction. You'd be wrong. The train I take to class five days a week is the same one that carries passengers from O'Hare International Airport to downtown and back. (You should spend just two hours at the O'Hare international terminal watching how many flights come and go through this city from around the globe. It would blow your mind.) This gives me a wonderful opportunity to chat up folks who are visiting my city and to try to act as a sort of one-man welcoming committee. I have personally met, spoken with, and in a couple cases given personal tours to visitors from Mexico, Canada, Costa Rica, France, England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany, Japan, China (both mainland and Taiwan), Korea, Poland, Czech Republic, Australia, Brazil, India, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, Croatia, Trinidad, Jamaica, and Russia. God knows how many other nationalities I could add to that list if only every foreign tourist spoke enough English that I could have a basic conversation with them. I've watched people disembark onto Navy Pier from international cruise ships arriving from Europe and from the Caribbean Islands (mostly filled with Europeans). Why would foreign cruise ships chug their way some 1,200 miles inland to make a port of call in Chicago if this were not an internationally renowned city?

And what did these international tourists come to see/do? They came to see our buildings/architecture, visit our museums, experience our world-class cuisine, shop the world-renowned Magnificent Mile, take boat tours through the city on the Chicago River, shop/eat/hang out at Navy Pier, chill on our beaches, browse our countless art galleries, furniture galleries & boutique shops, participate in our ethnic festivals (Taste of Romania happens just three blocks from my flat), catch a Broadway show or two or three in our theater district, see a Cubs game (particularly Asian tourists, though I'm sure we don't draw nearly as many Asian baseball fans as the Yankees or Dodgers)... hell, at least a couple international tourists I rubbed elbows with came just to see the Oprah Winfrey show. Some came primarily to participate in international conventions; but when international conventions can be held anywhere in the world, why hold them in Chicago? Answer: because of all the reasons listed above. With all due respect to fine non-coastal cities like Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Detroit, Louisville, Minneapolis, Buffalo and St. Louis, I doubt they draw as many international tourists combined as Chicago does.

This is going to sound patronizing, but I don't care: Being that someone recently pointed out to me that you're 17 years old, it became obvious that your life experiences and accumulated knowledge are limited by your age. Accordingly, you may not know as much about Chicago as you might have if you were 27, 37 or 47. But I promise you once again, your ignorance of our city is not shared by either domestic or international tourists who have more well-formed life experiences. You said you've always wanted to come visit. I hope you do, because the first day you step foot here will be the day you completely change your mind about what Chicago has to offer.

So... to tie all this in to the original topic of this thread: Do New York and L.A. overshadow Chicago? You bet they do. And that's fine. But that does not put Chicago on the same plane as your average Middle-America city, and it does not diminish Chicago's status as an internationally influential city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2007, 06:00 AM
 
1,119 posts, read 2,420,695 times
Reputation: 382
Madman,

People around the world don't know much about Chicago like you said and yet domestic & international travelers still voted Chicago the 3rd best US city 2 years in a row after NYC and SF

While you are totally ignorant about Chicago, some other travel sites called it among the best in the US. Why didn't they mention LA along with New York, Chicago and San Francisco ? Did you try to figure it out yourself? Sometimes you need to think..think and think, young man!!!

By the way, do you agree with the below assessment about your own city?

Top 10 underrated U.S. cities


Sure, N.Y., Chicago, S.F. are nice, but don't forget these overlooked locales

Updated: 10:54 a.m. CT April 11, 2007

Everyone knows cities like New York, San Francisco, and Chicago are among the best in the U.S., but there are many other fabulous — albeit smaller — American cities that just don't get their fair share of the limelight. Whether their proximity to a bigger city steals their thunder or a recent city makeover remains undiscovered by the masses, the cities on our list are oft-overlooked by even the savviest of travelers. If you're looking to broaden the scope of your trips to include some less-talked-about places with great art scenes, friendly locals, delectable cuisine, and rich history, add one of our ten most underrated cities to your "must-see" list.


Top 10 underrated U.S. cities - US and Canada - MSNBC.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top